ECU Undergraduate Catalog 2000-2001

ASIP: INFORMATION PROCESSING/ADMINISTRATIVE SERVICES

1500, 1501. Electronic Information Processing I (3,0) (F) (S) 3 lecture and 1 lab hours per week. Beginning course in electronic touch keyboarding and use of information processing systems to produce text documents via a computerized delivery system.

2000. Introduction to Computer Literacy (1) (F) (S) May not count toward the BA or BS degree. Knowledge and skills needed to satisfy basic technology competencies required to support and enhance professional productivity, information access, collaboration, and communication among educators. Word processing, spread sheets, and database management are covered.

2112. Introduction to Information Processing Technology (3) (F) (S) (SS) Designed to illustrate the use of various data processing systems for business applications and to acquaint students with functional and operational characteristics of data processing systems.

2212, 2213. Basic Programming for Business Applications (3,0) (F) (S) P: ASIP 2112 or equivalent. Designing and coding basic programs related to business applications for use on the microcomputer.

2311, 2312. Financial Information Systems (3,0) (F) (S) 3 lecture and 1 lab hours per week. Study of financial information systems procedures and problems of business organizations with special emphasis on computerized applications.

2500, 2501. Electronic Information Processing II (3,0) (F) (S) 3 lecture and 1 lab hours per week. P: ASIP 1500 or consent of instructor. Includes electronic keyboarding skill building and application of detailed information processing concepts in the production of documents that are generated through an electronic delivery system.

3220. Business Communications (3) (F) (S) All students pursuing an undergraduate business education or marketing education teacher certification option must earn a grade of C or better. P: ENGL 1200. Develops an understanding of the need for effective communications in business through application of basic principles of written communications to the solution of specific business problems.

3228. Administrative Management (3) (F) (S) Provides opportunities to examine evolving concepts and practices of administrative management, including emphasis on handling information.

3291, 3292, 3293, 3294. Internship: Supervised Work Experience (1,2,3,4) (F) (S) (SS) Work hours for 3291: 100; for 3292: 200; for 3293: 300; for 3294: 400. May be taken in any combination up to a maximum total of 4 s.h. credit. P: Consent of a departmental coordinator and a minimum of one semester as a full‑time ECU student. Supervised work experience program designed to strengthen the student's competency in the business education or vocational marketing and distributive education area.

3311, 3312. Financial Information Systems II (3,0) (F) (S) 3 lecture and 1 lab hours per week.  P: ASIP 2311. Automated approach to accounting through the use of integrated computer software.

3500, 3501. Electronic Information Processing III (3,0) (F) (S) 3 lecture and 1 lab hours per week. P: ASIP 2500 or equivalent. Advanced information processing features are included in the study and applications of modern‑day information processing systems.

4200, 4201. Microcomputer Business Applications (3,0) (F) (S) 3 lecture and 1 lab hours per week. P: ASIP 2500 or consent of instructor. Advanced course in the use of specialized microcomputer applications software to produce business documents and reports.

4300. Administrative Office Procedures (3) (F) (S) Designed to develop an understanding of the role of administrative support personnel on the job.

4500. Information Processing Systems Design (3) (F) (S) P: ASIP 2212, 2213, 2500; or equivalent. Provides for an advanced study of information processing concepts and systems in today's automated office environment. Enhances students' preparation for decision‑making roles in the area of information processing and/or management with emphasis on conducting feasibility studies and dealing with change.

5200, 5201. Microcomputer Business Graphics Applications (3,0) (F) (S) (SS) P: ASIP 4200 or consent of instructor. Advanced course in the use of specialized graphics‑oriented microcomputer applications software to produce business documents, reports, brochures, newsletters, pamphlets, and other page‑composition publications.

ASIP Banked Courses

1000. Keyboarding (1)
2114. Beginning Shorthand (3)
2116. Intermediate Shorthand (3)
2120. Introduction to Transcription (3)
3214. Advanced Shorthand (3)

ASLS: AMERICAN SIGN LANGUAGE STUDIES

2020. Sign Language Studies I (3) (F) (S) (SS) (Formerly CSDI 2020) Introduction to American Sign Language vocabulary as used by deaf adults, including the process of the gestural‑visual medium of communication, basic structure of American Sign Language, the development of expressive and receptive signing skills, and a basic orientation of deaf culture.

2030. Sign Language Studies II (3) (F) (S) (SS) (Formerly CSDI 2030) P: CSDI 2020. Continues the study of American Sign Language by developing expressive and receptive conversational skills.

2040. Deaf Culture and the Community (3) (F) (S) (SS) (Formerly CSDI 2040) Orientation to the social, cultural, linguistic, and psychological effects of deafness by describing the changing attitudes toward deafness and hearing‑impaired persons and the historical development of education for the hearing impaired. Educational, psychological, communication, vocational, and social effects of deafness on the deaf individual and the adaptations of individual deaf persons.

3060. Sign Language Studies III (3) (F) (S) (SS) (Formerly CSDI 3060) P: CSDI 2030; or consent of the instructor. Continues the study of American Sign Language with an emphasis on syntax and grammatical rules. Continues the development of expressive and receptive signing skills.

3070. Introduction to Interpreting for the Deaf (3) (F) (CSDI 3070) P: CSDI 2040, 3060; or consent of instructor. Introduction to basic theories, principles, and practices of interpreting for the deaf. Emphasizes the prerequisite skills in educational interpreting and provides an introduction to interpreting in the following settings: legal, medical, theatrical, musical, television, religious, job placement, mental health, and counseling.

3080. Sign Language Studies IV (3) (F) (S) (SS) (CSDI 3080) P: CSDI 3060 or consent of instructor. Advanced course in American Sign Language. Students will acquire an indepth knowledge of the grammatical structure of American Sign Language as well as increase their sign fluency and comprehension.

3090. Interpretation and Transliteration for the Deaf I (3) (S) (CSDI 3090) P: CSDI 3060, 3070; or consent of instructor. Introduces students to the basic interpreting and transliterating process. Students will analyze English and ASL texts and generate semantically equivalent messages in the target language. Focuses predominantly on the development and utilization of analytic and cognitive skills.

3091. Interpretation/Transliteration Laboratory (1) (S) (CSDI 3091) P: CSDI 3060, 3070; or consent of instructor; C: CSDI 3090. Activities to develop and strengthen interpretation and transliteration skills.

3100. Interpretation/Transliteration for the Deaf II (3) (F) (CSDI 3100) P: CSDI 3080, 3090, 3091; or consent of instructor. Focuses on the interpreting process. Application of knowledge and skills to practical situations encountered in the interpreting profession. Emphasis on continuing vocabulary development and accurate rendering of messages in consecutive interpreting situations.

BIOL: BIOLOGY

1030. Plants and Human Affairs (3) (F) (S) (GE:SC) May not count toward BIOL major or minor. BIOL 1051 may be taken as a lab complement. Introduction to the biology of plants and their related organisms and to their importance throughout history.

1050. General Biology (3) (F) (S) (SS) (GE:SC) May not count toward BIOL major or minor. Molecular basis of biology, bioenergetics, control systems, reproduction and development, genetics, diversity, evolution, communication, and behavior ecosystems.

1051. General Biology Laboratory (1) (F) (S) (SS) (GE:SC) 1 3‑hour lab per week. May not count toward BIOL major or minor. C: BIOL 1030 or 1050. Practical applications of biological principles.

1060. Environmental Biology (4) (F) (S) (SS) (GE:SC) May not count toward BIOL major or minor. Basic study of the interrelationships of organisms with each other and with their environment and human factors. Basic ecological problems, principles, and solutions will be presented.

1061. Environmental Biology Laboratory (1) (F) (S) (GE:SC) 1 3‑hour lab or field excursion per week. May not count toward BIOL major or minor. Optional lab or field course offered to provide a more indepth look at habitats.

1080, 1081. General Zoology (5,0) (F) (GE:SC) 4 lectures and 1 3‑hour lab per week. Introduction to the biology of major animal phyla with emphasis on phylogeny, morphology, and physiology.

1100, 1101. Principles of Biology I (4,0) (F) (S) (SS) (GE:SC) Introduction to molecular biology, bioenergetics, cellular structure, and physiology. The molecular basis of inheritance and control of gene expression are also explored.

1200, 1201. Principles of Biology II (4,0) (F) (S) (SS) (GE:SC) Discussion of the five living kingdoms and the diversity that prevails in natural systems. Principles of evolution, ecology, and behavior are emphasized, particularly in the context of diversity.

2015. Introduction to Biological Anthropology (3) (WI*) (F) (S) (GE:SC) Same as ANTH 2015. May count toward general education science requirement for all except ANTH majors. May not count toward general education social science requirement. RP: BIOL course. Introduction to evolutionary theory, human evolution, and the formation of human variability, adaptation and genetics, and our relationship with other primates.

2016. Biological Anthropology Laboratory (1) (F) (S) (GE:SC) Same as ANTH 2016. May count toward general education science requirement for all except ANTH majors. May not count toward general education social science requirement. C: BIOL 2015. Laboratories in human genetics, population genetics, anthropometry, anthroposcopy, dermatoglyphics, blood pressure, blood typing, osteometry, primate taxonomy, and human evolution.

2110, 2111. Fundamentals of Microbiology (4,0) (F) (S) 3 lectures and 2 2‑hour labs per week.  May not count toward BIOL major or minor. P: BIOL 1050, 1051; or 1100, 1101; or equivalent; 8 s.h. in CHEM. General study of microorganisms and their importance to humans, with special emphasis on their fundamental life processes, including a brief introduction to epidemiology and immunology.

2130. Survey of Human Physiology and Anatomy (4) (F) (S) (SS) (GE:SC) P: BIOL l1050, 1051; or 1100, 1101. One‑semester survey of the functional anatomy and normal physiology of human organ systems.

2131. Survey of Human Physiology and Anatomy Laboratory (1) (F) (S) (SS) (GE:SC) 3 lab hours per week. May not count toward BIOL major or minor. P/C: BIOL 2130. Introductory principles and review of the anatomy of the organ systems of the human.

2250. Ecology (3) (F) (S) (SS) P: BIOL 1100, 1101, 1200, 1201. Structure and function of ecosystems. Relationships of environmental factors operating in different habitats to the floral and faunal composition of each community.

2251. Ecology Laboratory (1) (F) (S) (SS) 3 lab hours per week. P: BIOL 1100, 1101, 1200, 1201; C: BIOL 2250. Field experiences and lab methods used to determine the structure and function of ecosystems.

2300. Principles of Genetics (3) (F) (S) (SS) P: 2 BIOL courses. Emphasizes modern genetics and its application.

3070, 3071. Survey of Plants and Fungi (4,0)  May receive credit for only one of the following sequences: BIOL 1070, 1071; 3070, 3071. P: 3 s.h. of science with a lab. Introductory survey of plants and fungi with emphasis on evolutionary patterns in structure, reproduction, and ecological function.

3100, 3101. Basic Laboratory Methods for Biotechnology (3,0) (F) (SS) 1 lecture and 4 lab hours per week. P: BIOL 2300; CHEM 1160, 1161. Practical basic training in lab techniques generally applicable to molecular biology, cell biology, biochemistry, genetics, and microbiology.

3220, 3221. Microbiology (4,0) (F) 3 lectures and 2 2‑hour labs per week. P: BIOL 1200, 1201; organic CHEM course. Study of the structure, physiology, disease, environmental relationships, and molecular biology of microbes.

3230, 3231. Field Botany (4,0) (F) (S) (SS) P: 3 s.h. of general BIOL with a lab. Introduction to plant identification and the interactions of plants with their chemical, physical, and living environments. Emphasis is on recognition of common vascular elements of the local flora and major plant communities of coastal North Carolina.

3240, 3241. Field Zoology (4,0) (F) P: BIOL 1060 or 2250. Introduction to methods and principles in zoological field study. Focuses mainly on local North Carolina vertebrate fauna.

3310, 3311. Cellular Physiology (4,0) (F) (S) (SS) 3 lectures and 1 3‑hour lab per week. P: organic CHEM or biochemistry course. Structure and function of cells, with emphasis on the physico‑chemical aspects. Current status of major problems such as gene function, photosynthesis, contraction, active transport, and nerve cell function.

3320. Principles of Animal Physiology (3) (F) (S) (SS) P: 2000‑level organic CHEM or biochemistry course. Introduction to the concepts of animal physiology.

3321. Principles of Animal Physiology Laboratory (1) (F) (S) (SS) C: BIOL 3320. Lab to accompany BIOL 3320.

3400, 3401. Biological Field Studies of the Coastal Plain (3,0)  2 lecture and 3 lab hours per week. P: 2 courses in BIOL or GEOL or consent of instructor. Field studies in the coastal plain, current status, and change initiated by nature and man. Field trips and field projects are important parts of the course.

3520. Biological Evolution (3) (F) P: BIOL 2300 or consent of instructor. Description of evolution from a biological standpoint. The relationships of evolutionary theory and the reciprocal impact on ecology, genetics, diversity, and biogeography. Speciation, selection, and populations are all considered in class discussions.

3550. Biology Honors (1) (WI) (F) (S) (SS) Conferences with staff as needed. May be repeated for a maximum of 2 s.h. credit. Seminar and research course; admission by faculty invitation. Student taking this course will normally be expected to take BIOL 4550.

3660. Introduction to Marine Biology (3) (F) (S) (SS) P/C: BIOL 2250, 2251. Introductory course about ocean habitats and the marine plants and animals comprising various marine ecosystems. At least one field trip to the coast will be required during the semester at the student's expense.

3661. Introduction to Marine Biology Laboratory (1) (F) (S) 3 lab hours per week. C: BIOL 3660. Lab exercises designed to examine physical and chemical properties of ocean waters and representative marine organisms.

4040. Human Genetics (3) P: BIOL 2300. Emphasizes concepts of Mendelian and molecular genetics as applied to the inheritance of human genetic disorders.

4050, 4051. Comparative Anatomy (4,0) (F) 2 lectures and 2 3‑hour labs per week. P: 6 s.h. in BIOL. Study of structure and relationship of the vertebrate animals with emphasis on the phylogeny of organ systems through the various classes.

4060, 4061. Embryology (4,0) 3 lectures and 1 3‑hour lab per week. P: BIOL 2300. Early developmental processes of anatomical and physiological significance with particular emphasis on developmental stages of the frog, chick, and mammalian embryos.

4200, 4201. Population and Community Ecology (4,0) (WI) (S) P: BIOL 2250, 2251, 2300; CHEM 1150, 1151; RP: CHEM 1160, 1161; MATH 2121 or statistics course. Introduction to the way populations and communities are organized with emphasis on interactions among organisms and their environments and how these structure populations and communities.

4300, 4301. Ecosystem Ecology (4,0) (WI) (F) P: BIOL 2250, 2251. Indepth examination of ecosystem processes including primary production, decomposition, and nutrient cycling as they are influenced by biotic and environmental controls in terrestrial, aquatic, and wetland ecosystems.

4400. Terrestrial Field Ecology (4) (SS) 2 lecture and 6 lab or fieldwork hours per week. Field and lab work at an off-campus research site may involve additional costs. P: BIOL 2250, 2251; a statistics course, consent of instructor (by application).  Introduction to research skills and techniques used by ecologists in freshwater and terrestrial systems in preparation for ecological research at the graduate level.

4500.  Marine Field Ecology (4) (SS) 2 lecture and 6 lab/fieldwork hours per week at an off-campus research site or field station. May involve additional costs. P: BIOL 3660, 3661; a statistics course; consent of instructor. Introduction to research skills and techniques used by marine ecologists in preparation for marine and oceanographic research at the graduate level.

4504, 4514. Research Problems in Biology (2,2) (WI) (F) (S) (SS) 4 hours of research‑related work per week. May be repeated for a maximum of 4 s.h. credit. P: Consent of instructor. Designed to meet the individual needs and interests of well‑qualified undergraduate students.

4550. Biology Honors (2) (WI) (F) (S) (SS) Conferences with staff as needed. May be repeated for a maximum of 4 s.h. credit. Seminar and research course; admission by faculty invitation.

5070, 5071. Ornithology (3,0)  2 lectures and 1 2‑hour lab or field excursion per week. P: 8 s.h. in BIOL. Recognition of native birds in their natural surroundings; structure, economic importance, seasonal occurrence, and migration.

5150, 5151. Herpetology (4,0) (S) 3 lectures and 1 3‑hour lab per week. P: 8 s.h. in BIOL. Taxonomy, anatomy, physiology, distribution, phylogeny, natural history, and ecology of the reptiles and amphibians of the world, with special emphasis on the species of North Carolina and the Atlantic Coastal Plain.

5190. Immunology (3) (F) 3 lectures and 1 3‑hour lab per week. P: BIOL 2300, 3220, 3221. Introduction to the structure, function, and genetic organization of the body's defense system including the interactions of immunocompetent cells and their role in infection, disease, and autoimmunity.

5200, 5201. Invertebrate Zoology (4,0) (F) 3 lectures and 1 3‑hour lab per week. P: 6 s.h. in BIOL. General comparative anatomical and physiological aspects of invertebrate groups; emphasis on similarities, differences, and evolution.

5220, 5221. Limnology (4,0) (S) 3 lectures and 1 3‑hour lab per week. P: BIOL 2250, 2251; or consent of instructor. Physical, chemical, and biological factors of inland waters and their influence on aquatic organisms.

5230, 5231. Phycology (4,0) 3 lectures and 1 3‑hour lab per week. P: BIOL 1200, 1201. Systematic survey of algae with emphasis on their role in aquatic ecosystems. Lab emphasizes techniques for studying algae and use of systematic keys.

5260, 5261. Microbial Ecology (4,0) (S) 3 lectures and 2 2‑hour labs per week. P: BIOL 2250, 2251, 3220, 3221; or consent of instructor. Interactions between microorganisms and their physical, chemical, and biological environment. Microbial involvement in energy flow, nutrient cycling and intra/inter‑specific interactions. Introduction to statistical analyses of biological and ecological data.

5270. Marine Community Ecology (3) (S) P: BIOL 2250, 2251; or consent of instructor. Advanced examination of the ecology of marine and brackish water communities based on the principles of population biology and community ecology. Emphasis on current hypotheses concerning the processes structuring major communities.

5351. Biological Processes and the Chemistry of Natural Water (2) (S) 6 lab hours per week. P: BIOL 2250, 2251; 2 CHEM courses; or consent of instructor. Study of the interactions of water quality and biological processes in aquatic ecosystems.

5370. Biological Effects of Radiation (3) (F) Same as RONC 5370. P: BIOL 1100, 1101, 1200, 1201; or consent of instructor. Survey of the biological effects resulting from the interactions of radiation and matter for scientifically and technically‑oriented students.

5400. Wetland Ecology and Management (3) (S) P: BIOL 2250, 2251; or consent of instructor. Study of marshes, swamps, bogs, fens, and other intermittently flooded ecosystems. Emphasis on classification, ecosystem processes, structure, and management of freshwater and saltwater wetlands.

5401. Wetland Ecology Laboratory (1) (S) P: BIOL 2250, 2251; C: BIOL 5400. Study and application of methods to measure ecological properties, assess the functioning, identify plant communities, and understand the landscape interaction of wetland ecosystems.

5450, 5451. Histology (4,0) (S) 2 lectures and 2 2‑hour labs per week. P: 4 BIOL courses. Study of the organization of cells, tissues, and organs at the microscopic level.

5480, 5481. Cytology (2,2)  2 lectures and 2 2‑hour labs per week. P: 12 s.h. in BIOL. Thorough investigation of the structural components of both prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells, with emphasis on the function of such components.

5510, 5511. Transmission Electron Microscopy (4,0) (S)  2 lecture and 6 lab hours per week. P: Senior standing as a BIOL major or consent of instructor. Introduction to theory, design, and use of the transmission electron microscope and to the preparation of biological materials for its use.

5520, 5521. Scanning Electron Microscopy and X-Ray Analysis (2,0) (F) (SS) 1 lecture and 4 lab hours per week. P: Senior standing as a BIOL major or consent of instructor. Introduction to the theory and techniques of scanning electron microscopy, X-Ray analysis, and to the preparation of materials for both.

5550, 5551. Ichthyology (4,0) (F) 2 lectures and 2 3‑hour labs per week. Study of the evolution and biology of the major fish groups of the world, with special emphasis on North Carolina species.

5600, 5601. Fisheries Techniques (3,0) (F) 2 lectures and 1 3‑hour lab or field excursion per week. P: BIOL 2250, 2251; or equivalent. Practical training in field and lab experimental methods in fisheries techniques. Designed primarily for biology majors interested in marine biology. Field trips and field studies are integral parts of the course.

5630, 5631. Comparative Animal Physiology (4,0) (S) 3 lectures and 1 3-hour lab per week. P: 2 BIOL and 2 organic CHEM courses. Comparative study of the principles of function of the organ systems of the major groups of animals, including nutrition, digestion, respiration, the skin and temperature control, the blood and circulatory systems, excretion, the muscular-skeletal system, nervous coordination, and endocrine system.

5640, 5641. Entomology (4,0) (F) 3 lectures and 1 3‑hour lab per week. P: 12 s.h. in BIOL. Study of insects, including their general anatomy, physiology, ecology, and classification.

5680. Current Topics in Coastal Biology (2) (S) P: Consent of instructor. Seminar on environmental issues in coastal biology presented by directed reading, lecture, and discussion.

5730, 5731. Animal Physiological Ecology (4,0) (S) 3 lectures and 1 3‑hour lab per week. P: BIOL 2250, 2251; 3310, 3311 or 3320, 3321 or 5800; or consent of instructor. Physiological adjustments and responses of animals to their environment, with consideration given to the mechanisms involved. Consideration of invertebrate, vertebrate, aquatic, and terrestrial animals.

5750, 5751. Introduction to Regional Field Ecology (2,0) (WI) 20 hours of lecture and 32 hours of field trips. May not count toward MS in BIOL or molecular biology/biotechnology. Introduction to major regional ecosystems for science and environmental studies teachers.

5800, 5810. Principles of Biochemistry I, II (3,3) (F) (S) P: CHEM 2760, 2762. Metabolism and metabolic regulation of the major groups of compounds in living cells. Emphasis on small molecules in 5800 and on macromolecules, especially proteins and nucleic acids, in 5810.

5821. Principles of Biochemistry Laboratory (1) (F) (S) P/C: BIOL 5800 or 5810. General biochemistry lab designed to complement BIOL 5800, 5810. Required for biochemistry majors; recommended for biology majors.

5870. Molecular Genetics (3) (F) P: BIOL 2300; RP: BIOL 3220, 3221, 5810. Study of genetics of prokaryotic and eukaryotic organisms at the molecular level. Structure and function of nucleic acids; replication, recombination, and repair; control of gene expression; and other related topics.

5890. Virology (3) P: BIOL 3100, 3101; or 5870; 3220, 3221; or consent of instructor. Survey of plant, animal, and bacterial viruses, with emphasis on the distinctive features of viruses as they relate to parasitism, disease, and basic research.

5900, 5901. Biotechniques and Laboratory (2,3)  (S) 2 1‑hour lectures and 2 4‑hour labs per week. P: BIOL 3100, 3101, 5870; consent of instructor; RP: BIOL 5810; C for 5901: BIOL 5900. Theory and practice of modern genetic engineering technology. Topics include DNA purification, electrophoresis, restriction mapping, use of DNA modifying enzymes, basic cloning in plasmid vectors, and strain construction by conjugation and transduction.

5930, 5931. Microcomputer Applications in Molecular Biology (2,0)  1 lecture and 1 3‑hour lab per week. P: BIOL 3310, 3311; or 5810 or 5870. Techniques for the analysis of the biological characteristics of nucleic acid and protein molecules using BASIC with microcomputers.

5950, 5951.  Taxonomy of Vascular Plants (4,0) (F) 1 2-hour lecture and 1 4-hour lab per week.  P: 12 s.h. in BIOL or consent of instructor; RP: BIOL 2250, 2251. Introduction to plant importance, identification, classification, and evolution as well as how plants interact with their living and nonliving environments. Field experiences emphasize the major communities and dominant floral elements of coastal North Carolina.

5995. Internship (1) (F) (S) (SS) 3 hours per week. May be repeated for a maximum of 2 s.h. credit. P: Consent of instructor. Experience in lab situations under the direct supervision of a member of the biology faculty.

BIOL Banked Courses

1070, 1071. General Botany (5,0)
2140, 2150. Human Physiology and Anatomy (3,3)
2141, 2151. Human Physiology and Anatomy Laboratory (1,1)
2260. Cell and Developmental Biology (3)
2261. Cell and Developmental Biology Laboratory (1)
3301. Principles of Genetics Laboratory (1)
4720. Principles of Biology II (2)
5000, 5001. Radiotracer Techniques in Biology (3,0)
5020, 5021. Animal Parasitology (4,0)
5040, 5041. Mycology (4,0)
5050. Applied Ecology (3)
5080, 5081. Plant Anatomy and Morphology (4,0)
5110, 5111. Plant Growth and Development (4,0)
5678. Biology of Aging (3)
5850, 5851. Biometry (3,0)
5860, 5861. Biological Applications of Digital Computers (3,0)
5880, 5881. Microbial Physiology (4,0)
5910, 5911. Vascular Plant Systematics (4,0)
5920, 5921. Vertebrate Systematics (4,0)

BIOS: BIOSTATISTICS

1500. Introduction to Biostatistics (3) (F) (S) P: MATH 1065 or equivalent or consent of instructor. Introduction to the application of statistics to the health field. Topics include the organization and display of different types of data, elementary probability, and statistical inference for one- and two-sample problems.

3501. Experimental Design I (3) P: Consent of instructor. Detailed coverage of the analysis of variance. Topics presented will include the analysis of variance for completely randomized, randomized block, factorial, and split plot designs; multiple comparison procedures; tests of normality and homogeneity of variance; and an introduction to the general linear model.

4371, 4372, 4373. Statistical Consulting I, II, III (1,1,1) P for 4371: BIOS 3501 or equivalent or consent of instructor; P for 4372: BIOS 4371 or equivalent or consent of instructor; P for 4373: BIOS 4372 or equivalent or consent of instructor. Development and discussion of skills involved in statistical consulting and data analysis. The student will work with the instructor on several projects, which will include meeting with the client, conceptualizing the problem, forming the statistical model, analyzing the data, and writing the report.

5010. Epidemiology for Health Professionals (3) (F) P: BIOS 1500 or consent of instructor. Introduction to epidemiology. Distribution of disease in human populations and factors that influence this distribution will be discussed. Emphasis will be given to studying the leading causes of death, to evaluating health research, and to utilizing epidemiologic methods.

5021. Biostatistics for Health Professionals I (3) (F) (S) May not be used as a prerequisite for HPRO 4350. Introduction to the application of statistics to the health field.  Topics include types, organization, and display of data, elementary probability, parametric and nonparametric techniques when dealing with one- or two-sample (matched or independent) hypothesis testing.

5022. Biostatistics for Health Professionals II (3) (F) (S) May not be used as a prerequisite for HPRO 4350. P: BIOS 5021 or consent of instructor. Introduction to the application of statistics to the health field. Topics include analysis of variance for one- and two-factor designs; randomized block and repeated measures designs; linear regressions; nonparametric test for 1 factor and randomized block designs.

5450. Applied Multivariate Analysis (3) P: BIOS 3501; MATH 3256; or equivalent; or consent of instructor. Development and discussion of multivariate topics, including the multivariate normal distribution, MANOVA, principal components analysis, discriminant analysis, and other related topics.

5500. Nonparametric Statistical Methods (3) P: BIOS 3501 or consent of instructor. Application of nonparametric methods for various problems in statistical analysis. Includes procedures based on randomization and ranks.

BIOS Banked Courses

2001. Biostatistical Methods I (3)
2002. Biostatistical Methods II (3)
3502. Experimental Design II (3)
3511. Applied Regression Analysis (3)
4200. Sampling Techniques (3)
4810. Applied Time Series (3)
4900. Biostatistics Honors (3)
5300. Advanced Epidemiologic Design and Analysis (3)
5350. Application of Statistical Methods in Epidemiology (2)
5400. Research Planning in Epidemiology (3)
5575. Introduction to Survivorship Analysis (3)
5600. Categorical Data Analysis (3)

BVTE: BUSINESS, VOCATIONAL, AND TECHNICAL EDUCATION

2123. Early Experiences for the Prospective Teacher (1) (F) (S) Minimum of 16 hours of directed observations and planned participation in appropriate school environments and 8 hours of seminar class instruction in the teaching area. P: 9-12 s.h. in major field and/or consent of instructor. Introduction to the teaching of business, marketing, home economics, or technology education designed for prospective teachers.

3200. Distribution Technology I: Merchandising (3) (F) Study of basic business and merchandising procedures, including emphasis upon store operations, merchandising mathematics, pricing, strategies, and inventory procedures.

3301. Distribution Technology II: Promotion (3) (F) P: ECON 2113. Basic course designed to provide an understanding of technical promotional problems of concern to supervisory personnel and to prospective teachers of business and marketing education subjects.

3302. Distribution Technology III: Selling (3) (F) (S) Study of basic business and selling procedures, including emphasis upon selling preparation, selling techniques and procedures, and selling aids.

4323. Methods of Teaching Workforce Preparedness Education (3) (F)  P/C: PSYC 4305 or consent of instructor. Methods of teaching workforce preparedness education curricula. Includes study of methodology related to the student’s special interest areas. Among topics included are planning for instruction, group and individualized instructional techniques and strategies, instructional materials development and utilization, community resources utilization, and evaluating student progress.

4324. Internship in Workforce Preparedness Education (10) (S) Full-time, semester-long internship. P: Admission to upper division; C: BVTE 4325. Internship in an assigned workforce preparedness education public school classroom.

4325. Internship Seminar: Issues in Workforce Preparedness Education (0) (S) P: Admission to upper division; C: BVTE 4324. Individualized study of problems or issues pertinent to workforce preparedness education.

4390. Consumer Financial Management (3) (WI) (F) (S) Treatment of problem areas of major concern in business, marketing, and home economics education. Problem areas of local, state, and national interest will be included as topics for discussion. Among the topics included are credit management, consumer economics, personal finance, money and banking, risk management, and small business management.

4400. Administration and Supervision of Workforce Preparedness Education Programs (3) (S) The organization, administration, and supervision of workforce preparedness education programs are discussed. Topics included are history of workforce preparedness education programs, school-to-work transition programs, management of youth organizations, workforce preparedness curricula, and student evaluation techniques.

5205. Teaching Special Populations in Vocational Education (3) (S) P: SPED 3000 or equivalent. Emphasizes modification and development of materials, curricula, and programs for special needs students in vocational education.

5388, 5389, 5390. Seminar in Vocational Education (3,3,3) (F) (S) (SS) May be repeated for credit with change of topic. Provides for treatment of problem areas of major concern in vocational education. Problem areas of local, state, and national interest will be included as seminar topics.

5500. Independent Study in Vocational Education (3) (F) (S) (SS) P: Senior or graduate standing in marketing education. Designed to foster independent study, research, and investigation in marketing education.

5503. Integrating Information Processing Technology into Vocational Education (3) P: Senior or graduate standing; consent of department chair. Designed to assist business education students to develop competency in the application of applied research to problems in teaching information processing subjects.

BVTE Banked Courses

5301. Middle Grades Career Exploration in Marketing and Business Education (3)

CDFR: CHILD DEVELOPMENT AND FAMILY RELATIONS

1103. Marriage and Family Relations (3) (F) (S) (SS) Marriage and family as functional relationships in which individuals love, grow, and share through communication, sexuality, and other human interrelationships.

2000. Child Development I: Prenatal Through Early Childhood (3) (F) (S) (SS)  Behavior and development of children from conception to eight years of age.

2001. Child Development II (3) (F) (S) (SS)  Behavior and development of children between the ages of eight and twenty-one years of age.

2123. Early Experience in Preschool Education (1) (F) (S)  Minimum of 16 hours of directed observation and planned participation in preschool settings and 12 hours of seminar. Introduction to birth-kindergarten teaching for prospective teachers.

2124.  Introduction to Work with Young Children  (2)  (F) (S) Requires practicum experience.  P: CDFR majors only; C: CDFR 2123.  Theory and practice in interacting with young children.  Course work and practicum will emphasize specific techniques of interaction with and guidance of infants, toddlers, and preschool-aged children.

2400. Introduction to Gerontology (3) (F) (S) (SS) (GE:SO) Same as GERO 2400 and SOCW 2400. May count toward general education social science requirement and SOCI major or minor. Survey of current theory and research in the gerontology field presented from an interdisciplinary perspective.

3002. Child in the Family (3) (F) (S) (SS) Overview of child‑family relationships with special emphasis on the reciprocal interaction of child and family.

3150. Risk and Resiliency in Child Development (3) (F) (S) P: CDFR 2000. Exploration of child and environmental characteristics that put children at risk or may serve as protective factors.

3200. Developmental Assessment and Intervention with Young Children (3) (WI) (F) (S) Requires practicum experience. P: CDFR 2000, 3150. Issues and applications in early intervention for children, birth through six years of age, including selection and use of assessment instruments, curriculum materials, and early intervention activities.

3413. The Hospitalized Child (3) (WI) (F) (Formerly CDFR 4413) P: CDFR 2000, 2001; or consent of instructor. Introduces concepts and techniques of working with children and families in hospital settings.

4001. Community Service Internship (8) (WI) (F) (S) Minimum of 310 hours to include labs and classroom work. P: CDFR major. Observation and participation with a community agency.

4210. Child Life Practicum (3) (F) (S) (SS) 1 conference and 8 participation hours per week. P: Child Life major; CDFR 3413.  Practical experiences in child life programming and care for children with medical or other special needs.

4303. Families and Cultural Diversity (3) (F) (S) P: CDFR 1103. Comprehensive study of family diversity that occurs because of different cultural environments. Racial, ethnic, and economic differences will be explored with the emphasis on developing an understanding and appreciation for families with differing values and beliefs.

4306. Directing Behavior and Development of Children (3) (F) (S) (SS) Functions and responsibilities of teachers and parents in guiding children. Review of research concerning practices and methods for directing and modifying behavior and development.

4313. Trends and Issues in Family Studies (3) (F) (SS) P: CDFR 1103. Review of selected topics related to marriage and family relationships. Contemporary trends and issues that impact on marriage and families will be explored.

4321. Infant and Toddler Curriculum (F) (3) Requires practicum experience. P: CDFR 3150. Application of principles of child development in designing appropriate environments and curricula for children birth to three years.

4322.  Preschool Methods and Materials (3)  (S) (Formerly CDFR 4308)  Requires practicum experience.  P: CDFR 3150.  Application of principles of child development and preschool education in designing appropriate learning environments and curricula for children ages three to five years.

4323.  Kindergarten Curriculum (3) (S)  Requires practicum experience. P:  CDFR 3150 and admission to  upper division.  Application of principles of child development and early childhood education in designing appropriate environments and curricula for kindergarten children.

4324. Internship in Birth Through Kindergarten Education (10) (F) (S) Full-time, semester-long internship. P: Admission to upper division; CDFR 3200, 4406; professional studies courses; C: CDFR 4325. Observation and supervised teaching in an assigned public school program or other approved school/center serving children birth through kindergarten.

4325. Internship Seminar: Issues in Birth-Kindergarten Education (2) (F) (S) P: Admission to upper division; C: CDFR 4324. Individualized study of problems and/or issues in birth through kindergarten education.

4366. Family Life Education (3) (S) P: CDFR major; junior or senior standing. Introduction and critical analysis of family life education including its nature, history, intellectual and philosophical foundations, delivery, and evaluation of methods, materials, resources, and group processes.

4390. Family Resource Management (3) (S)  P: CDFR major. Identification and management of family resources including the impact of decision making on families’ quality of life. Effect of resource generation and allocation on family relationships and well being at different stages of family life.

4406. Parent-Professional Collaboration (3) (WI) (F) (S) (SS) Requires practicum experience. P: CDFR 1103, 3002, 3200, 4306. Collaboration between families and professionals with emphasis on strategies, skills, and resources needed to facilitate development of young children.

4410. Professional Seminar (1) (WI) (F) (S) P: CDFR major; senior standing; consent of instructor. Development of professional practices. Topics will vary.

4415. Child Life Internship (12) (F) (S) (SS) 480 total hours. P: CDFR 3413, 4210, 4996, 4997.  Specialized child life experience with children and families in a hospital setting.

4996, 4997. Child‑Family Internship and Laboratory (3,0) (F) (S) (SS) 1 conference and 8 lab hours per week. P: CDFR 1103, 2000, 3002; consent of instructor. Supervised practicum experience in a program serving children and/or families. Variable titles and content permitted.

5007. Public Policy and Legal Issues Affecting Families (3) (SS) P: CDFR major. Current public policy and legal issues facing professionals who work with children and families.

5300. Sex Roles (3) (F) Sex role through the life cycle with attention to influences of family ethnicity.

5309. Infancy Intervention (3) (SS) 2 lecture and 2 lab hours per week. P: CDFR major; CDFR 2000; graduate standing; or consent of instructor. Infant and toddler screening techniques for disabilities; sequential selection and effective use of play materials; and community resources available for working with parents.

5403. Parent Education (3) (S) P: CDFR 1103; 2000 or 2001; 3002, 4306; senior standing.  Survey of strategies, skills, and resources that can assist parents and that are needed by professionals who work directly with parents.

5408. Administration of Programs for Young Children (3) (SS) Planning, organizing, and administering programs for young children.

5411. Counseling Elders and Their Families (3) (SS) P: GERO 2400 or consent of instructor. Overview of interventions for age‑related problem behaviors in the social and family systems of the elderly.

5412. Family Crises and Resources (3) (S) Individual and family reactions to crises and special problems encountered in family living and individual and community resources pertinent to such problems.

5420. Family Intervention Models (3) (F) P: CDFR major. Survey of selected family intervention and skill development models with opportunity for indepth study of the individual theoretical approach.

5901, 5902, 5903. Readings in Aging Studies (1,2,3) (F) (S) (SS) Same as GERO 5901, 5902, 5903 and SOCW 5901, 5902, 5903. May count a maximum of 3 s.h. toward the graduate certificate or baccalaureate minor in GERO. P: Consent of instructor and chairperson of instructor's home unit. Selected readings taken from monographs or journals in gerontology or aging studies. The focus is upon specialized areas in which the student has already taken one or more courses in either the graduate certificate or baccalaureate minor in gerontology.

5992, 5993. Advanced Preschool Internship (3,0) (F) (S) 1 conference and 8 lab hours per week. P: Consent of instructor. Advanced internship experiences with preschool children and their parents.

CDFR Banked Courses

2290. Management Theory (3)
3100. Resource Management for the Elderly (3)
3210, 3211. Preschool Education (3,0)
4411. Professional Internship (3)
4998, 4999. Preschool Practicum (9,0)
5336. Methods of Teaching Personal and Family Living (3)
5392. Economic Problems (3)
5400. Seminar in Aging Studies (3)
5410. Gerontology: Developing the Living Environment (3)

CHEM: CHEMISTRY

0150. Preparation for College Chemistry (2) (F) (S) (SS) 3 lectures per week. May not count toward general education science requirement. C: MATH 1065. Intensive review and study of basic chemical laws and mathematical tools needed for further study in general chemistry.

1020. General Descriptive Chemistry (4) (F) (S) (GE:SC) May not count toward general education science requirement for science majors. General chemistry for nonscience majors.

1120.  Basic General, Organic, and Biochemistry I (4) (F) (S) (SS) (GE:SC)  May not count toward general education science requirement for science majors.  Study of general, organic, and biochemistry and chemical applications in the health professions.

1121.  Basic General, Organic, and Biochemistry Laboratory I (1) (F) (S) (GE:SC) 3 laboratory hours per week. C: CHEM 1120. Introduction to laboratory techniques in general, organic, and biochemistry.

1130.  Basic General, Organic, and Biochemistry II (3) (F) (S) (SS) (GE:SC) (Formerly CHEM 2620) May not count toward general education science requirement for science majors.  P: CHEM 1120.  Continuation of CHEM 1120.

1131.  Basic General, Organic, and Biochemistry Laboratory II (1) (F) (S) (SS) (GE:SC) (Formerly CHEM 2621) 3 lab hours per week.  Continuation of CHEM 1121.

1150, 1151. General Chemistry and Laboratory I (3,1) (F) (S) (SS) (GE:SC) 3 lecture and 3 lab hours per week. P: Chemistry placement test or passing grade in CHEM 0150; P/C: MATH 1065; C for 1150: CHEM 1151; C for 1151: CHEM 1150. General chemistry for science majors, including basic principles and laws of chemistry. Topics include measurements, reactions and stoichiometry, thermochemistry, atomic structure, periodicity, bonding and molecular structure, and states of matter.

1160, 1161. General Chemistry and Laboratory II (3,1) (F) (S) (SS) (GE:SC) 3 lecture and 3 lab hours per week. P: CHEM 1150, 1151; C for 1160: CHEM 1161; C for 1161: CHEM 1160; RC: MATH 1075 or 1085. Continuation of CHEM 1150. Topics include solutions, kinetics, equilibrium, acid-base theory, thermodynamics, electrochemistry, and an introduction to organic, nuclear, and coordination chemistry.

2111. Applications of Molecular Modeling (1) (F) (S) (GE:SC)  P/C: CHEM 2750. Applications of molecular modeling will be utilized to explore relationships between molecular structure and molecular properties.

2250, 2251. Quantitative and Instrumental Analysis (3,2) (WI) (F) (S) 3 lecture and 6 lab hours per week. P: CHEM 1160, 1161; 1 semester of organic CHEM; C for 2250: CHEM 2251; C for 2251: CHEM 2250. Theories and techniques of classical quantitative and modern instrumental analysis.

2650, 2651. Organic Chemistry for the Life Sciences (4,1) (F) 4 lecture and 3 lab hours per week. May not count toward CHEM major or minor. Not an acceptable prerequisite for CHEM 2760. P: CHEM 1160, 1161; C for 2650: CHEM 2651; C for 2651: CHEM 2650. Study of the principles of organic chemistry with emphasis on biologically important topics.

2750. Organic Chemistry I (3) (F) (S) (SS) P: CHEM 1160, 1161. Classes of compounds and their typical reactions; mechanisms and stereochemistry; instrumental methods in organic chemistry.

2760, 2762. Organic Chemistry and Laboratory II (3,2) (F) (S) (SS) 3 lecture and 6 lab hours per week. P for 2760: CHEM 2750; C for 2760: CHEM 2762. Continuation of CHEM 2750.

2770.  Biological Chemistry (3) (F) (S) (GE:SC) P: CHEM 2650 or 2750. Study of the chemistry and intermediary metabolism of proteins, carbohydrates, lipids, and nucleic acids.

2771.  Biological Chemistry Laboratory (1) (F) (S) (GE:SC) 3 lab hours per week.  C: CHEM 2770. Application of chemical laboratory techniques to the study of proteins, carbohydrates, lipids, and nucleic acids.

3450, 3451. Elementary Inorganic Chemistry and Laboratory (3,1) (WI) (S) 3 lecture and 3 lab hours per week. P: CHEM 2250, 2251; C for 3450: CHEM 3451; C for 3451: CHEM 3450. Study of modern chemical principles, periodic properties, and reactions of the elements.

3501, 3502, 3503. Special Topics in Chemistry (1,2,3) May be repeated for a maximum of 6 s.h. of credit with change of topic. May not count toward general education science requirement. P: CHEM 1160 and consent of instructor. Selected topics of contemporary interest in chemistry.

3850, 3851. Introduction to Physical Chemistry (4,1) (WI) (F) 4 lecture and 3 lab hours per week. P: CHEM 1160, 1161; MATH 2122 or 2172; PHYS 1260; C for 3850: CHEM 3851; C for 3851: CHEM 3850. General survey of physical chemistry for students with a limited mathematical background.

3860, 3861. Introduction to Instrument‑Computer Interfacing (2,1)  Same as PHYS 3860, 3861. 2 lecture and 2 lab hours per week. P: PHYS 2360 and knowledge of a high‑level computer language such as BASIC, FORTRAN, and COBOL; C for 3860: CHEM 3861; C for 3861: CHEM 3860. Introduction to interfacing and programming of scientific and industrial computers for data acquisition, data manipulation, and control of instruments and processes.

3950, 3951. Physical Chemistry and Laboratory I (4,1) (WI) (S) 4 lecture and 3 lab hours per week. P: PHYS 2360; MATH 2173; CHEM 2250, 2251; C for 3950: CHEM 3951; C for 3951: CHEM 3950. Theoretical and mathematical treatment of the fundamental laws and theories underlying the science of chemistry.

3960, 3961. Physical Chemistry and Laboratory II (4,1) (WI) (F) 4 lecture and 3 lab hours per week. P: CHEM 3950, 3951; C for 3960: CHEM 3961; C for 3961: CHEM 3960. Continuation of CHEM 3950, 3951.

4103. Seminar (1) (F) (S) P: Junior or senior standing. Introduction to the chemical literature, discussion of contemporary topics in chemistry, and submission of written and oral reports on approved topics. Attendance at selected departmental seminars is required.

4505, 4506, 4507. Independent Study (1,2,3) (F) (S) (SS) P: Consent of instructor and department chair. Individual study in a selected area of chemistry under the immediate direction of a member of the faculty.

4515, 4516, 4517. Research Problems in Chemistry (1,2,3) (F) (S) (SS) May be repeated for credit. May count a maximum of 6 s.h. toward CHEM major. P: Consent of instructor. Advanced problems in chemistry pursued under the supervision of a faculty member.

5350, 5351. Instrumental Analysis (3,1) (WI) (S) 3 lecture and 3 lab hours per week. P: CHEM 3960; C for 5350: CHEM 5351; C for 5351: CHEM 5350. Theory and practical uses of modern instrumental methods of chemical analysis.

5525, 5526, 5527. Special Topics (1,2,3) May be repeated for credit with change of topic. P: Consent of instructor. Selected topics of current interest in the areas of analytical, inorganic, organic, and physical chemistry.

5550. Advanced Inorganic Chemistry (3) (F) P: CHEM 3450, 3950. Study of the newer theories, developments, and procedures in inorganic chemistry.

5750. Advanced Organic Chemistry (3) P: CHEM 2760; P/C: CHEM 3960. Covers physical organic topics, including aromaticity, acid/base chemistry, reactive intermediates, mechanisms of common organic reactions, and the relationship between structure and reactivity.

5760. Organic Structure Elucidation (3) P: Consent of instructor.  Application of modern instrumental methods to the elucidation of the structures of organic compounds, with particular regard to the elucidation of complex structures from the combined application of spectral tools.

5993. Industrial Internship in Chemistry (3)  25‑30 lab hours per week. A maximum of 3 s.h. may count toward CHEM major. P: CHEM 2250, 2760, 3950; selection by a joint Department of Chemistry/industry screening committee. Intended to give students professional experience in industrial application of chemistry.  

CHEM Banked Courses

1163. Introduction to Computer Techniques in Experimental Chemistry (1)
5390. Bioanalytical Chemistry (2) 
5450. Industrial Chemistry (3)
5970. Chemical Thermodynamics (2) 


ECU Undergraduate Catalog 2000-2001
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