ECU Undergraduate Catalog 2000-2001

 

CHIN: Chinese

CHIN Banked Courses

2000, 2001. Chinese Language I, II (3,3)

CLAS: CLASSICAL STUDIES

1300. Greek and Latin for Vocabulary Building (3) (GE:HU) No previous knowledge of Greek or Latin required. Study of the Greek and Latin elements in English, intended to increase dramatically the student’s knowledge of English and command of its vocabulary.

2000. Introduction to Classics (Humanities) (3) (GE:HU) May receive credit for only one of CLAS 2000, 2001, 2002. Introduction to the civilization of classical antiquity through a survey of the literature, philosophy, and art of ancient Greece and Rome.

2001. Introduction to Classics (Social Sciences) (3) (GE:SO) May receive credit for only one of CLAS 2000, 2001, 2002. Introduction to the civilization of classical antiquity through a study of the history and culture of ancient Greece and Rome.

2002. Introduction to Classics (Fine Arts) (3) (GE:FA) May receive credit for only one of CLAS 2000, 2001, 2002. Introduction to the civilization of classical antiquity through a survey of the art of ancient Greece and Rome. Although the emphasis will be art-historical, readings will include major works of literature from both cultures.

2220. Great Works of Ancient Literature I: Greece (3) (GE:HU) Study of ancient Greek literature from the time of Homer to Alexander the Great, emphasizing the cultural ideals expressed in epic and lyric poetry, drama, philosophy, oratory, and history.

2230. Great Works of Ancient Literature II: Rome (3) (GE:HU) Study of Roman literature from Plautus to Marcus Aurelius, emphasizing the cultural ideals expressed in its epic and lyric poetry, drama, philosophy, oratory, and history.

2400. Women in Classical Antiquity (3) (GE:HU) Study of the status and daily life of women in ancient Greece and Rome, of the attitudes expressed toward them and of their roles in art, archaeology, and literature of the ancient world through a contemporary approach.

3400. The Ancient City: Rome (3) (F) (S) (GE:HU) Study of the development of 1 of the world’s great cities, Rome, from its origins to late antiquity, using its monuments and topography as sources for the history and culture of the society that produced them.

3410. The Ancient City: Pompeii (3) (GE:HU) Pompeii is the oldest archaeological site still under continuous excavation. Studies the development of Pompeii from its origins to the eruption of Mt. Visuvius in 79 AD, using its monuments and topography as sources for the history and culture of this unique Roman city.

3460. Classical Mythology (3) (F) (GE:HU) Same as ENGL 3460. Major myths of ancient Greece and Rome and their impact on English and American literature.

4000. Seminar in Classics (3) P: 9 s.h. in CLAS minor or consent of director. Interdisciplinary seminar in classics on various topics to be chosen by instructors and students.

CLSC: CLINICAL LABORATORY SCIENCE

2000. Introduction to Clinical Laboratory Science (2) (F) (S) Introductory course designed to acquaint the student with the four major areas in the clinical lab: hematology, immunology, clinical chemistry, and microbiology. The function of various health professionals in these areas and career opportunities will be explored.

3110. Normal Hematology and Clinical Microscopy (3) (F) P: CLSC major.  Introduction to characteristics and methods of chemical and microscopic examination of urine and other body fluids. Introduction to the study of the formation and morphology of various cellular elements in the blood.

3111. Normal Hematology and Clinical Microscopy Laboratory (1) (F) 3 lab hours per week. P: CLSC major; C: CLSC 3110. Series of lab exercises to introduce the student to basic tests and techniques used in clinical hematology and clinical microscopy.

3120. Hemostasis and Abnormal Hematology Lecture (3) (S) P: CLSC major; CLSC 3110, 3111; or consent of instructor. Study of hemostasis and hematological disorders with emphasis on lab data.

3121. Hemostasis and Abnormal Hematology Laboratory (2) (S) 6 lab hours per week. P: CLSC major; CLSC 3110, 3111; or consent of instructor. Lab exercises in advanced blood cell morphology and hemostasis.

3130, 3131. Clinical Immunology and Serology (2,1) (F) 2 lecture and 3 lab hours per week. P: Consent of instructor. Basic concepts and techniques of immunology and serology as applied in the clinical lab.

4000. Independent Study in Clinical Laboratory Science (1) P: Admission to CLSC program; consent of department chair. Individual study in a selected area of clinical laboratory science under the immediate direction of a member of the faculty.

4210, 4211. Immunohematology Lecture and Laboratory (2,1) (SS) 2 lecture and 3 lab hours per week. P: CLSC 3130, 3131; consent of instructor. Basic concepts of immunohematology with emphasis on basic lab techniques and resolution of problems in the preparation and administration of blood components.

4300. Clinical Laboratory Management (3) (WI) (S) P: Consent of instructor. Survey of management principles as applied to the clinical lab.

4302. Research Project (2) (F) P: CLSC major and consent of instructor. Planning and completion of an independent research project under the guidance of academic and clinical faculty.

4305. Special Topics in Clinical Laboratory Science (1) (S) P: CLSC major and consent of instructor. Selected current topics in clinical lab science.

4450. Teaching in the Clinical Laboratory (2) (F) P: CLSC major and consent of instructor. Introduction to educational techniques useful in planning and presenting inservice education and bench instruction in the clinical lab.

4500. Research Problems in Medical Technology (2) P: Consent of department chair. Individual study in a selected area of CLSC under the supervision of a department faculty member.

4530, 4531. Clinical Chemistry I (3,2) (F) 3 lecture and 6 lab hours per week. P: 4 courses in CHEM; PSYC 2101 or other statistics course; consent of instructor. Application of the basic principles of analytical and biochemistry to the quantitation of chemical constituents in body fluids and their relationship to disease states.

4540, 4541. Clinical Chemistry II (3,1) (S) Continuation of CLSC 4530, 4531. 3 lecture and 3 lab hours per week. P: CLSC 4530, 4531; consent of instructor for nonmajors.

4550, 4551. Clinical Microbiology I (4,2) (S) 4 lecture and 6 lab hours per week. P: BIOL 2110, 2111; or 3220, 3221; 3310, 3311; or consent of instructor. Essentials of clinical mycology and clinical parasitology. Lectures, demonstrations, and programmed instruction.

4560, 4561. Clinical Microbiology II (4,3) (SS) 4 lecture and 9 lab hours per week. P: CLSC 4550, 4551; or consent of instructor. Essentials of clinical bacteriology. Lectures and demonstrations.

4570. Special Topics in Microbiology (2) (F) P: Consent of instructor. Current, advanced topics in clinical microbiology for medical technologists.

4992. Clinical Education–Hematology, Coagulation, Urinalysis (4) (F) (S) 256 hours in the appropriate department of an affiliated clinical lab. P: CLSC 3120, 3121; consent of instructor. Supervised clinical experience in hematology, coagulation, and urinalysis.

4993. Clinical Education–Chemistry (4) (F) (S) 256 hours in the appropriate department of an affiliated clinical lab. P: CLSC 4540, 4541. Supervised clinical experience in clinical chemistry.

4994. Clinical Education–Blood Bank and Serology (4) (F) (S) 256 hours in the appropriate department of an affiliated clinical lab. P: CLSC 4210, 4211; consent of instructor. Supervised clinical experience in blood bank and serology.

4997. Clinical Education–Microbiology (4) (F) (S) 240 hours in the appropriate department of an affiliated clinical lab. P: CLSC 4560, 4561; consent of instructor. Supervised clinical experience in clinical microbiology.

4998. Clinical Education in Alternate Settings (2) P: Consent of instructor. Supervised clinical experience in a variety of lab settings.

CLSC Banked Courses

4600. Introduction to Clinical Cytology (2)
4601. Introduction to Cytological Techniques (1)
4610. Gynecologic Cytology (6)
4611. Gynecologic Cytology Laboratory (6)
4620. Respiratory Cytopathology (3)
4630. Cytology of Body Fluids (3)
4641. Cytology of the Alimentary Tract (2)
4642. Urinary Tract Cytology (2)
4650. Cytology of Fine Needle Aspiration (3)
4660. Special Techniques in Cytology (2)
4665. Seminar in Cytotechnology 92)
4750. Clinical Education in Cytology I (4)
4751. Clinical Education in Cytology II (5)
4995, 4996. General Clinical Education (1,1)

CMGT: CONSTRUCTION MANAGEMENT

2660, 2661. Construction Techniques I (3,0) (F) (S) 2 lecture and 2 lab hours per week. Survey course in construction that deals with basic theories and practices related to light residential construction.

2664. Construction Techniques II (3) (F) (S) (SS) Introduction to construction as a career. The most common construction tasks: earthwork, foundations, concrete, steel, and basic building components.

2666. Soils and Foundations (3) (F) (S) (SS) P: CMGT 2664; GEOL 1500, 1501; MATH 1074; PHYS 1250, 1251. Survey of the fundamentals of soil mechanics as it relates to construction and structural foundations and to construction of shallow and deep foundations.

3000. Construction Work Experience (0) (F) (S) (SS) P: Consent of instructor. Construction work of at least 500 documented hours is a graduation requirement of all construction management students. Work must be completed with a state-licensed general contractor, subcontractor, construction management company, or other instructor approved employment.

3100, 3101. Architectural Plans and Analysis (3, 0) (F) (S) (SS) 2 lecture and 2 lab hours per week. P: CMGT 2660, 2661, 2664; DESN 2034, 2035; MATH 1065. Practical experience in reading and evaluating plans for commercial structures to access design parameters, construction materials, and construction placement techniques with emphasis on developing graphic communication.

3660. Structural Analysis (3)  (F) (S) (SS) P: CMGT 2664; MATH 1074; PHYS 1250, 1251. Introductory course of statics, strength of materials, and structural analysis as they relate to the stability of a building’s structural components. Topics include building loads resulting in compressive and tensile forces in columns, beams, and trusses; strength of components to resist such loads; analysis of components under varying load conditions; and basic design considerations of common temporary construction structures such as formwork, bracing of vertical elements, rigging for lifts, and retaining walls.

3662, 3663. Mechanical and Electrical Construction (3,0) (F) (S) (SS) 2 lecture and 2 lab hours per week. P: CMGT 2664; PHYS 1260, 1261. Theory and principles of the plumbing, electrical, and HVAC systems in buildings. Emphasis is on basic theory, climate, and shelter considerations, building materials, heat gain, mechanical systems, sound and vibration control, and lighting systems.

3664. Construction Contracts and Specifications (3) (F) (S) (SS) P: CMGT 2664; FINA 2244.  Practices and principles in the use of contract documents and specifications as they apply to a construction project. Emphasis will be placed on how contract documents and specifications relate to the construction process and involve the project management.

3666, 3667. Construction Surveying (3,0) (F) (S) (SS) 2 lecture and 2 lab hours per week. P: DESN 2034, 2035; MATH 1074 or 1075; consent of instructor. Construction aspects of surveying with field and classroom exercises in the use of transit, level, tape, and related surveying equipment. Problems and exercises in stadia; traverse closure; and pipeline, grading, street, curve, and building layout.

4501. Laboratory Problems: Construction Management (3) 6 lab hours per week. P: Consent of CMGT instructor. Independent study to gain further expertise in a particular area of construction management.

4502, 4503, 4504. Independent Study: Construction (1,2,3) P: CMGT 4662 and consent of department chair. Special topics in selected areas of construction that provides students the opportunity to explore and research personal areas of interest.

4506. Laboratory Problems: Woods Processing Technology (3) 6 lab hours per week. P: Consent of chairperson. Study of selected concepts and processes in the field of woods processing technology.

4600. Managing Building Quality (3) (WI) (F) (S) (SS) P: CMGT 3660, 3664; ITEC 3290. Tests, inspections, and methods used to control the quality of construction.

4660. Construction Estimating (3) (F) (S) P: ITEC 2000, 2001; or computer elective; CMGT 3100, 3101, 3664; C: CMGT 3660. Procedures used to determine the quantity of materials, manpower, and machinery needed to complete a construction project. Emphasis will be devoted to classification of work, quantity survey techniques, and cost estimating of labor, materials, and equipment for a building.

4662. Construction Planning and Scheduling (3) (F) (S) P/C: CMGT 4660. Application of planning and scheduling techniques to a building project. Use of bar charts and critical path method (CPM) will be emphasized as well as cost allocation, schedule updating, cash flow, resource scheduling, and manpower distribution.

4664. Construction Supervision (3) (F) (S) P: CMGT 4662. Study of management techniques to solve the unique problems of a construction project. Emphasis on application and practice, the management of manpower, materials, money, and machinery.

4666. Equipment Management (3) (F) (S) (SS) P: CMGT 3660; ITEC 3292. Survey course in equipment management that deals with productivity, performance, and maintenance requirements of construction equipment.

5503. Independent Study: Construction (3) May be repeated for credit with consent of department chair. Research‑oriented course in problem solving with tools, materials, and processes of the construction industry.

CMGT Banked Courses

2064, 2065. Woods Processing Technology I (3,0)
2662. Construction Techniques II (3)
3062, 3063. Woods Processing Technology II (3,0)
4508. Laboratory Problems: Power Technology (3)

COAD: COUNSELOR AND ADULT EDUCATION

1000. Student Development and Learning in Higher Education (1) (F) (S) 2 classroom hours per week. Limited to students enrolled in the first two semesters at ECU or consent of instructor. Introduction to student life at the university with particular focus on the development of academic skills, learning processes, career decision-making, and personal attributes essential for student success.

2001. Issues and Topics for Residential Advisers (2) (F) (S) P: Consent of department chair. Provides training to become effective resident advisers.

4800. Interaction Skills in Education (2) (S) Introduces communication, helping, and counseling skills beneficial for facilitating understanding between teacher, student, parents, and administration in an educational setting.

5370. Introduction to Counseling and Human Services (3) (F) (SS) Basic course introducing issues and processes involved in counseling services and programs. Attention to history, philosophy, functions, and professionals issues related to the counseling profession.

COAD Banked Courses

5380. The Adult Education Learning Center (3)

COAS:  COASTAL AND MARINE STUDIES

2025. Survey of Coastal and Marine Resources (3) (F) May not be taken after receiving credit for COAS 2125. P: Basic science course in BIOL, CHEM, GEOL, or PHYS. Survey of the biological, physical, social, and historic aspects of coastal and marine resources.

4025. Society and the Sea Seminar (3) (S)  May not be taken after receiving credit for COAS 5025, 5026. P: COAS 2025. Interdisciplinary seminar in coastal and marine resources. Research paper of senior-level quality will be required.

5000. Shipboard and Underwater Research Techniques (2) 1 class and 6 shipboard and/or lab hours per week. P: Consent of COAS program director.  Fundamentals of collecting and treating coastal marine materials, including water, sediment, biological populations, and underwater artifacts.

5001, 5002. Coastal Marine Resources Problem Analysis (3,3) Equivalent of 60 hours of research per semester. P: Research project approved by instructor.  Analysis of a recognized problem in coastal marine resources in consultation with assigned faculty.

COAS Banked Courses

2125. Survey of the Coastal Marine Environment (2)
2150. Introduction to Nautical Science (2)
2151. Nautical Science Laboratory (1)
5025, 5026. Man and the Sea Seminar (1,1)
5050, 5051. Nautical Charts and Navigation (3,0)

COHE: COMMUNITY HEALTH

COHE Banked Courses

5460, 5461. Patient Education for Interdisciplinary Health Care Providers (3,0)

COMM:  COMMUNICATION

COMM 2001 is prerequisite for all COMM courses numbered 2999 and above. COMM 2002 is prerequisite for COMM majors and minors for all COMM courses numbered 2999 and above.

The following COMM courses may not count toward the general education social sciences requirement: COMM 2002, 2003, 2200, 3010, 3030, 3080, 3200, 3210, 3211, 3221, 3225, 3230, 3260, 3270, 3271, 3360, 3440, 3570, all 4000-level courses.

2001. Communication Theories and Processes (3) (F) (S) (GE:SO) Examination of the process and theories affecting human communication.

2002. Media Writing (3) (F) (S) (SS)  P: ENGL 1100. Introduction to writing techniques for print, electronic mass media, public relations, and advertising.

2003. Multimedia Messages for Communication Professionals (3) 2 lecture and 1 lab hours per week. P: COMM 2002 or consent of instructor. Introduction to multimedia techniques in professional communication settings, incorporating text, sound, and video messages through computer technology. Emphasis is on integrated message production used by communication professionals in journalism and public relations.

2200. Basic Reporting (3) (WI) (F) (S) (SS)  P: COMM 2002. Study of journalistic news style and the gathering, writing, and editing of news stories.

3010. Persuasion Theories (3) (S)  Persuasion is examined as a communication process through differing aspects of source, channel(s), and receiver(s); emphasis on contributions from behavioral theorists.

3030. Communication Research (3) (F) (S) 2 classroom and 1 lab hours per week. Research methods used to measure the content, process, and effects of communication on attitudes, knowledge, and behavior. Research design, data analysis, evaluation, and results presentation in quantitative and qualitative research methodologies.

3050. Interpersonal Communication Theory (3) (F) (GE:SO) Theories and concepts which explain communication in ongoing interpersonal relationships. Focus is on relationship development and maintenance.

3080. Intercultural Communication (3)  Examines communication theory and practice in multicultural contexts; how cultural differences affect interpersonal, organizational, and international communication.

3200. Copy Editing and Design (3) (F) (S) (SS) P: COMM 2200. Basic course in editing and layout of a variety of publications.

3210. Advanced Reporting (3) (WI) (F) (S) P: COMM 2200. Instruction in advanced news gathering techniques, research strategies, and interviewing.

3211. Business and Economic Reporting (3) P: COMM 3210; ECON 2113. Prepares communication students to write about business and economic events.

3221. Investigative Reporting (3) (WI) P: COMM 3210. Advanced news gathering techniques for journalists. Includes on-line database searching and off‑campus trips to encourage indepth reporting.

3225. Reporting for Visual Media (3) 2 lecture and 1 lab hours per week. P: COMM 2200. News-gathering and reporting techniques for presentation through visual media, examination and critical analysis of investigative reports, special events coverage, and the documentary.

3230. Feature Writing (3) P: COMM 3210. Study and practice in feature writing for newspapers, magazines, and special publications.

3260. Visual Editing (3) P: COMM 3200 or consent of instructor. Use of informational graphics in newspaper and public relations design and layout.

3270. Video Magazine Practicum (3) 1 lecture and 6 lab hours per week. P: COMM 2003 and consent of instructor. Lab for students working on the university’s video yearbook, Treasure Chest, or other team-oriented video production projects used in public relations and journalism. Lab hours to be arranged.

3271. Multimedia Production Laboratory (3) 1 lecture and 6 lab hours per week. P: COMM 2003 and consent of instructor. Independent, practical work in multimedia production with faculty supervision.

3290. International News Communication (3) (S) (GE:SO) P: COMM 2002 or consent of instructor. Study of world news communication systems, including international news flow, news gathering agencies, foreign correspondents, theories, debates, and the role of communication in global coexistence at the socio‑economic and political levels.

3360. Organizational Communication Theory (3) Meanings and functions of communication in organizational settings, including communication in role relationships, internal and external information system flows, and the role of communication in organizational culture development and maintenance.

3440. Public Relations Theory (3) (F) (S)  Survey of theoretical, social, behavioral, and communicative aspects of public relations from which the practice is built.

3570. Small Group Communication (3) Examination of communication variables which influence the quality of group communication. How groups are used for information exchange, problem solving, and decision making.

3615. Media Effects (3) (F) (S) (GE:SO) Effects of mass media on individuals, societies, and cultures.

4030. Conflict and Communication (3)  P: COMM 3050 or 3360 or 3570. Role of communication in the productive settlement of interpersonal and organizational disputes. Examines effective communication strategies for dispute resolution, mediation, negotiation, and bargaining.

4035. Gender and Communication (3) (F) P: COMM 2001 or WOST 2000 or 2400. Examines the role of communication in the construction of gender and the role of gender in the social organization and use of language and communication systems.

4060. Special Problems in Communication (3) (F) (S) (SS)  P: Consent of instructor. Special projects, research, and independent reading for students capable of individual work under guidance of a faculty adviser. Designed to fit special needs and interests of students.

4070. Directed Readings in Communication (3) (F) (S) (SS)  P: Consent of instructor. Individually directed study.

4080. Senior Seminar (3) (F) (S) (SS)  COMM majors must complete 24 s.h. in COMM before registering for this course. P: Consent of instructor. Advanced study in communication emphasizing contemporary issues.

4090. Careers in Communication (3) (F) (S) (SS)  P: Senior standing and consent of instructor. Supervised internship in an area of professional communication, providing practical experience and requiring parallel readings and study.

4440. Public Relations Strategies (3) (F) (S) P: COMM 3440. Use of problem-solving strategies and principles of message design for developing public relations campaigns.

4445. International Public Relations (3) (F) P: COMM 3440. Study of public relations as practiced outside the United States. Examination of the reasons for international growth of public relations and exploration of opportunities for US involvement.

4600. Mass Media and Society (3) (F) (S) Study of social theories, topical issues, and problems of mass communication raised by control, performance, and ownership of the various media as they affect the American society.

4610. Communication Law (3) (S) Emphasis on First Amendment, libel, privacy, free press, and fair trial.

4655. Media Criticism (3) P: Junior standing and consent of instructor. Developing professional skills for criticizing media content. Includes criticism principles for news, media events, and television content.

4690. International Communication and the Foreign Media (3)  P: COMM 3290. Critical survey and analysis of international communication, emphasizing problem-solving approaches to various trends in the global flow of news and information.

4700. Senior Honors Seminar (3)  P: Senior standing; 3.5 cumulative and major GPA. Tutorially directed readings in selected area and research proposal writing.

4705. Senior Honors Thesis (3)  P: Minimum grade of B in COMM 4700. Tutorially directed. Designed to implement the research proposal generated in COMM 4700. Students will complete an oral examination covering both the reading assignments and the completed thesis.

COMM Banked Courses

3012. Persuasion Practicum (3)
3240. Photojournalism (3)
3580. Debate (2)
4233. Advising Student Publications (3)

CSCI:  COMPUTER SCIENCE

1610. Elementary PASCAL (3) (F) (S)  May not count toward CSCI major or minor. P: MATH 1065 or 1066 or 2127. Elementary introduction to the concepts of programming in the PASCAL computer language.

2510. Introduction to Computer Science I (3) (F) (S) (SS)  P: MATH 1065 or 1066. Expression of computation or other processes as algorithms. Basic features of computer architecture and computer execution of stored programs. Concepts of computer science.

2600. Introduction to Digital Computation (3) (F) (S)  May not count toward CSCI major or minor. P: MATH 1065 or 1066. Emphasizes the algorithmic approach to problem solving. Algorithms will be programmed and run on the computer by all students.

2610, 2611. Introduction to Computer Science and Laboratory II (4,0) (F) (S) (SS)  P: CSCI 2510; C for 2600: CSCI 2611; C for 2611: CSCI 2610.  Expression of computation and other processes as algorithms and the implementation of algorithms as computer programs. Students will write algorithms for specific problems in a contemporary high-level language, debug, and run the programs on a computer.

2618. COBOL (3) (F) (S) (SS)  P: CSCI 1610; 2600 or 2610. Basic and advanced elements of COBOL.

2901. Programming in ADA (1)  P: CSCI 2610 or consent of instructor. Highly condensed presentation of the ADA computer language suitable for students with an extensive background in a procedural language such as PASCAL.

2902. Programming in C (1) (F) (S)  P: CSCI 2610 or consent of instructor. Highly condensed presentation of the C computer language suitable for students with an extensive background in a procedural language such as PASCAL.

3510. Data Structures (3) (F) (S) (SS)  P: CSCI 2610; MATH 2119 or 2171. Overview of the mathematical structures generally useful in understanding and applying computer concepts.

3526. Switching Theory and Computer Organization (3) (F) (S) (SS)  P: CSCI 2610; MATH 2427. Introduction to the theory and practice of computer and computer component design. Gates and gate-level design.

3573. Introduction to Numerical Analysis (3) (S)  Same as MATH 3573. P: CSCI 2510 or 2600; MATH 2119 or 2172 or equivalent. Gives the student an understanding of algorithms, suitable for digital computation in the areas of linear algebra, linear programming, slope finding, area finding, and nonlinear equation solution.

3601. Computer Organization and Programming (3) (F) (S) P: CSCI 3510 or 3526. An assembly language is studied and used to illustrate a general machine architecture that will execute the assembly language command structure.

3609. Advanced COBOL (3) (F) P: CSCI 2618. Advanced techniques in COBOL including sorting, merging, updating files, writing reports, and linking subprograms.

3650. Analysis of Algorithms (3) (S)  P: CSCI 3510; MATH 2427. Use of decision trees, mathematical induction, and adversary arguments to analyze the correctness, complexity, and optimality of algorithms. Searching and sorting algorithms are emphasized.

3675. Organization of Programming Language (3) (F) (SS) P: CSCI 3510. Applied course in programming language constructs emphasizing the run‑time behavior of programs. Provides appropriate background for advanced level courses involving formal and theoretical aspects of programming languages and the compilation process.

3700. Database Management Systems (3) (F) P: CSCI 2618 or 3510. Introduction to the theory and techniques of relational, hierarchical, and network database management systems.

3800. Introduction to Computer Graphics (3) (F)  P: CSCI 3510; MATH 3584 or 3256. Introduction to computer graphics systems, hardware, interactive methods; line and curve drawing; 2- and 3-dimensional transformations; perspective transformation.

4200. Software Design and Development (3) (WI) (F)  P: CSCI 3510 and CSCI major. Formal approach to state‑of‑the‑art techniques in software design and development; provides an opportunity for students to apply the techniques.

4510. Object-Oriented Computing and Graphical User Interfaces (3) (S)  P: CSCI 3510. Object-oriented program design and development and data abstraction. Object-oriented programming languages. Applications to graphical user interfaces and event-driven computing.

4520. Introduction to Computer Architecture (3) (S) P: CSCI 3526, 3601; CSCI major. Introduction to the organization of the basic elements of a computer system. Organization of processor, memory, control unit, and I/O units will be studied.

4530. Computer Networks and the Internet (3) (F) P: CSCI 3601 and CSCI major. Theory and case studies of modern networking protocols and telecommunication methods.  Local area and long-haul networks.

4600. Systems Analysis (3) P: CSCI 3700, 4200; CSCI major. Basic concepts, procedures, and techniques associated with systems analysis are explored. Student learns to apply these by performing a class project.

4602. Theory of Automata and Linguistics (3) (F) P: MATH 2427 and CSCI major. Introduction to the basic concepts of automata theory and mathematical linguistics and their close interrelationship.

4627. Procedural Languages and Compilers (3) (S)  P: CSCI 3601, 3675; CSCI major. Introduction to the state of the art techniques for compiling procedural languages.

4630. Operating Systems I (3) (SS) P: CSCI 3601 and CSCI major. Introduction to job control and operating systems including system organization, resource and storage allocation, interrupt handling, addressing techniques, file structures, and batch/time sharing systems.

4905. Selected Topics in Computer Science (3) May be repeated for a maximum of 6 s.h. credit with change of topic.  P: CSCI 3510 and CSCI major. Consideration of new or advanced topics in computer science.

5002.  Logic for Mathematics and Computer Science (3) (S) Same as MATH 5002. P: CSCI 3510 or MATH 2427 or 2775 or 3223 or 3256 or Phil 3580 or equivalent.  Introduction to methods of mathematical logic that have important applications in mathematics and computer science.  

5210. Operating Systems II (3) (F) P: CSCI 4630 or consent of instructor. Theory and practice of concurrent processes in computer operating systems. Process scheduling. Memory and auxiliary storage management.

5220. Program Translation and Compiling (3) (S) P: CSCI 4627 or consent of instructor. Formal language specification for programming languages. Advanced parsing techniques. Code generation and optimization.

5501, 5502, 5503. Independent Study (1,2,3) (F) (S) (SS)  3-6 or more hours per week depending on the nature of the work assigned. P: CSCI 3601 or equivalent or consent of instructor. Designed to provide advanced computer science students an opportunity to study topics supplementing the regular curriculum.

5774. Programming for Research (3) (F) (S) P: General statistics course or consent of instructor. Designed for the graduate student who wishes to use the computer science option in meeting the department’s research skills requirement. Emphasizes a minimum level of programming skill and use of statistical packages.

5800. Artificial Intelligence (3) (F) P: CSCI 3510 or consent of instructor. Fundamental problems and techniques of artificial intelligence. Heuristic search. Concepts of expert systems.

CSCI Banked Courses

1584. Linear Algebra for Computer Applications (3)
1618. Elementary COBOL (3)
2903. Programming in FORTRAN (1) 
3574. Numerical Analysis II (3)
4604. Systems Simulation (3)
5726. Scientific Programming (1)

CSDI: SPEECH AND HEARING SCIENCES

2100. Introduction to Communication Disorders (3) (F) (S) (SS) 3 lectures per week plus observation of speech therapy sessions. Designed to acquaint students with the scope, history, and nature of speech‑language pathology and audiology. Topics considered are the development of language, the psychology of the speech and hearing impaired as well as a description of the etiology, symptomatology, and treatment of the major speech, hearing, and language disorders.

3010. Phonetics (3) (F) P: CSDI major or minor; CSDI 2100; PSYC 1000; or consent of instructor. Introduction to applied phonetics using the International Phonetic Alphabet and pertinent modifications. Detailed descriptions of American English speech sounds and transcription of contextual speech representing mainstream and nonmainstream dialects are presented; transcription abilities are developed in order to assess and treat disorders of speech.

3020. Language Development (3) (F) P: CSDI major or minor; CSDI 2100; PSYC 1000; or consent of instructor. Normal acquisition and development of language from birth through the preschool years, components of language, cognitive and communicative prerequisites, and language learning theories.

3030. Speech Science: Anatomy, Physiology and Acoustics (3) (F) 3 lecture and 1 lab hours per week. P: BIOL 1050, 1051; CSDI 2100; or consent of instructor. Anatomy, physiology, and acoustic correlates of the speech production mechanisms, including central and peripheral nervous systems, respiration, phonation, resonation, and articulation.

3050. Acquisition and Development of Phonology and Articulation (3) (S) P: CSDI 3010, 3030; or consent of instructor. Acquisition and development of normal phonological and speech sound/articulation skills emphasizing birth to five years of age and critical periods through the early teen years. Content areas include birth cry, babbling, cross linguistic and universal patterns of acquisition, morphophonology, metaphonology, historical and contemporary normative data issues, and interrelation of normal phonological development with other areas of language growth.

3105. Hearing Science (3) (S) P: PHYS 1050; CSDI 3030; or consent of instructor. Review of basic information, including acoustics, anatomy and physiology of the ear and central auditory nervous system, and psychoacoustics.

3990. Interpreting Internship (3) (S) P: CSDI 3100 or consent of instructor. Observation of activities interpreted by a professional in a variety of situations; weekly conferences with staff members; and participation in interpreting workshops. Actual interpreting experience under the guidance of assigned staff interpreter(s). Emphasis on exposure to the various interpreting techniques and settings, applying the Interpreter's Code of Ethics, and improving overall competence.

4000. Introduction to Speech Disorders (5) (F) P: CSDI 3050; or consent of instructor. Discussion of articulatory, phonatory, and stuttering disorders with emphasis on etiology and incidence. Basic information will be presented regarding assessment, management, and parent/client counseling for these disorders.

4020. Introduction to Language Disorders (3) (S) P: CSDI 3010, 3020, 3030; or consent of instructor. Classification of developmental childhood language disorders of children, adolescents, and adults and the language impairments of the aging. General assessment and management and techniques.

4100. Introduction to Audiology (3) (F) P: CSDI 3105 or consent of instructor. Introduction to concepts related to normal hearing, causes and effects of defective hearing, and hearing testing procedures.

4110. Aural Rehabilitation (3) (S) P: CSDI 4100 or consent of instructor. Introduction to the habilitation, rehabilitation of the hearing impaired as related to hearing aid use, speech‑reading, auditory training, and total communication. Management philosophies related to both children and adults are considered.

4335. Apprenticeship (3) (WI) (S) 1 staffing, 1 lecture, and 3-4 lab hours per week. P: CSDI major; consent of the departmental director of undergraduate studies; minimum of 25 hours observation of treatment as administered or supervised by ASHA certified speech-language pathologists/audiologists; CSDI 3020, 4000, 4100, 5010. Provides opportunities to develop basic clinical skills through observation and apprenticeship. The apprentice serves as an assistant to graduate clinicians in the management of two patients for the semester. Additional responsibilities are assigned as part of the experience.

5010. Procedures in Clinical Management (3) (F) P: CSDI major; CSDI 3020, 3050, 3105; or consent of instructor. Provides a basic understanding of the procedures involved in the diagnostic and treatment of communication disorders. Topics include observation styles, task presentation and analysis, reinforcement techniques, group management, and intervention models, including multicultural communication models.  Students are required to complete supervised observation experiences in various clinical and public school settings.

5510, 5511, 5512. Special Problems in Speech and Hearing (2,2,2) (F) (S) (SS) May be repeated for a maximum of 6 s.h. credit. May count toward the CSDI major with consent of department chair. Designed for advanced senior and graduate students to explore independently specific areas of interest in communication disorders and research.

5565. Seminar in Augmentative Communication (3) 2 and 1/2 lecture and 1 lab hours per week. P: Consent of instructor. Designed to provide an understanding and working knowledge of the interdisciplinary approach to augmentative communication. Emphasis is on the team approach, including discussion of and experience with patients requiring use of augmentative communication systems. Areas of study include assessment, intervention, neuromotor management, environmental control, computer access, and funding.

CSDI Banked Courses

5100. Introduction to Speech-Language and Hearing Disorders (2)

DESN: DESIGN AND DRAFTING

2034, 2035. Engineering Graphics I (3,0) (F) (S) (SS) 2 lecture and 2 lab hours per week. P: Computer-related elective. Survey communications course that gives the basic skills and theory of graphics. Application of graphics in manufacturing, construction, and related fields.

2036, 2037. Computer‑Aided Design and Drafting (3,0) (F) (S) (SS) 2 lecture and 2 lab hours per week. P: DESN 2034, 2035. Study and application of computer‑aided design and drafting (CADD) as it relates to the design process and development of engineering drawings and other documents. Use of CADD in various design disciplines, including architectural, electrical, mechanical, and civil, will be examined.

3030, 3031. Architectural Drafting (3,0) (F) (S) (SS) 2 lecture and 2 lab hours per week.  P: DESN 2034, 2035. Introduction to the fundamental areas of residential working drawings.

3032, 3033. Engineering Graphics II (3,0) (S) 2 lecture and 2 lab hours per week. P: DESN 2036, 2037. Continuation of DESN 2036, 2037 with greater depth in the application of graphics in manufacturing construction and related fields.

3036, 3037. Architectural Design and Drafting (3,0) (F) 2 lecture and 2 lab hours per week. P: DESN 2036, 2037, 3030, 3031. Practical experience in the design of commercial structures from the graphics perspective and development and interpretation of working drawings.

4030, 4031. Descriptive Geometry (3,0) (S) 2 lecture and 2 lab hours per week. P: DESN 3032, 3033; MATH 1074. Principles of projection, including reference system (the graphical method of solving solid analytic geometry problems).

4234, 4235. Machine and Tool Design (3,0) (F) 2 lecture and 2 lab hours per week. P: DESN 3032, 3033; MANF 2076, 2077. Study and application of the principles of machine and tool design. Students will be required to complete designs and drawings of machines, tools, fixtures, gauges, automated clamping devices, and piercing and forming dies.

4503. Laboratory Problems: Design and Drafting (3) (F) (S) (SS) 6 lab hours per week. P: DESN 3030, 3031; or 3032, 3033; or consent of instructor. Independent study which provides the opportunity to gain further expertise in a particular area of design and drafting.

4504. Laboratory Problems: Graphic Communication (3) (F) (S) (SS) 6 lab hours per week. P: Consent of chairperson. Independent study of concepts, processes, tools, and materials in the field of graphic communication technology.

5500. Independent Study: Graphic Communication (3) (F) (S) (SS) May be repeated for credit with consent of department chair. Research‑oriented course in problem solving in the field of graphic communication.

DESN Banked Courses

3034, 3035. Civil Drafting and Laboratory (3,0)
4032, 4033. Technical Illustration: Procedures and Practices (3,0)

DNCE:  DANCE

1000. Introduction to Dance (2) (F) (S) (SS) (GE:FA) May not count toward DNCE major. General education course introducing the development of dance as an art and the roles of the choreographer and the dancer.

1011. Ballet I (3) (F) (GE:FA) Progressive and continuous work in learning and perfecting technique in this most difficult and refined form of dance.

1012. Contemporary Dance I (3)  (GE:FA) Dance technique which does not employ a standardized vocabulary of steps.

1013. Jazz Dance I (3) (F) (GE:FA) May not count toward BFA in DNCE. Most recent dance form influenced by South American and African cultures.

1021. Ballet II (3) (S)  Progressive and continuous work in perfecting technique and style in ballet.

1022. Contemporary Dance II (3)  Progressive and continuous work in perfecting technique and style in contemporary dance.

1023. Jazz Dance II (3) (S) May not count toward BFA in DNCE. Progressive and continuous work in perfecting technique and style in jazz  dance.

2011. Pointe Technique I (1)  2 hours per week. P: Consent of instructor. Fundamentals of pointe technique.

2021. Pointe Technique II (1) 2 hours per week. P: DNCE 2011 or consent of instructor. Progressive and continued work in perfecting technique of pointe combinations and classical ballet variations.

2031. Ballet III (3) (F) Continued work on ballet technique.

2032. Contemporary Dance III (3) Continued work on contemporary dance technique.

2033. Jazz Dance III (3) (F) P: 6 s.h. ballet or consent of instructor. Continued work on jazz technique.

2041. Ballet IV (3)  Continued work in perfection of technique.

2042. Contemporary Dance IV (3)  Continued work in perfection of technique.

2043. Jazz Dance IV (3)  P: 6 s.h. ballet or consent of instructor. Continued work in perfection of technique.

2111, 2121. Ballet Technique Development I, II (3,3) 6 hours per week. P: Placement by faculty jury only. Progressive and continuous work in perfecting ballet technique.

2112, 2122. Contemporary Dance Technique Development I, II (3,3) 6 hours per week. P: Placement by faculty jury only. Progressive and continuous work in perfecting contemporary dance technique.

2113, 2123. Jazz Dance Technique Development I, II (3,3)  6 hours per week. P: Placement by faculty jury only. Progressive and continuous work in perfecting jazz dance technique.

2131, 2141. Ballet Technique Development III, IV (3,3)  6 hours per week. P: Placement by faculty jury only. Progressive and continuous work in perfecting ballet technique.

2132, 2142. Contemporary Dance Technique Development III, IV (3,3)  6 hours per week. P: Placement by faculty jury only. Progressive and continuous work in perfecting contemporary dance technique.

2133, 2143. Jazz Dance Technique Development III, IV (3,3)  6 hours per week. P: Placement by faculty jury only. Practical experience in various areas of dance performance directed and supervised by the faculty.

2190. Early Experiences for the Prospective Dance Educator (1) (F) 1 lecture hour for 6 weeks; 2 lab or studio hours for 10 weeks. For students who are considering a career in dance education. Introduction to the teaching of dance through observation and participation in teaching activities in school classrooms.

2200. Creative Dance and Drama for the Elementary School (2) (S) Same as THEA 2200. Survey of creative dance and drama content, philosophy, methodology, and projects appropriate for the student preparing to teach elementary grades.

2201. Dance Improvisation I (1) (F) 2 hours per week. Guided exploration in the elements of dance for the development of spontaneity of individual movement, group interaction, and choreographic skills.

2202. Dance Improvisation II (1) (S) 2 hours per week. Continuation of guided exploration in the elements of dance. Student will also create and conduct their own improvisations.

3000, 3001. Dance Performance (1,1)  6 hours per week. P: Consent of instructor. Practical experience in various areas of dance performance in a faculty‑choreographed production.

3011. Pointe Technique III (1) 2 hours per week. P: DNCE 2021 or consent of instructor. Progressive and continued work in perfecting technique of pointe combinations and classical ballet variations.

3021. Pointe Technique IV (1) 2 hours per week. P: DNCE 3011 or consent of instructor. Progressive and continued work in perfecting technique of pointe combinations and classical ballet variations.                             

3051. Ballet V (3)  P: DNCE 2041 or consent of instructor. Continued study in perfecting ballet technique.

3052. Contemporary Dance V (3)  P: DNCE 2042 or consent of instructor. Continued work toward perfection of technique and style.

3053. Jazz Dance V (3)  P: DNCE 2043 or consent of instructor. Continued work in perfection of technique.

3061. Ballet VI (3)  P: DNCE 3051 or consent of instructor. Continued study in perfecting ballet techniques.

3062. Contemporary Dance VI (3) P: DNCE 3052 or consent of instructor. Continued work toward perfection of technique and style.

3063. Jazz Dance VI (3) P: DNCE 3053. Continued work in perfection of technique.

3070. Fundamentals of Tap Dance (1) (F) (GE:FA) 2 classroom and/or lab hours per week. Introduction to tap dance as a performing art through study of basic tap vocabulary, fundamental rhythms, locomotor movements, and tap styles.

3071. Partnering in Dance (1) 2 hours per week. P: DNCE 2041 or consent of instructor. Progressive and continuous work in perfecting the technique of support and dance when performing with another individual.

3072. Intermediate Tap Dance (1) (S) 2 classroom and/or lab hours per week. P: DNCE 3070. Designed to develop a vocabulary of tap terminology, a repertoire of tap steps, and a recognizable jazz/tap style in performance.

3073. Advanced Tap Dance (1) 2 hours per week. P: DNCE 3072 or consent of instructor. Progressive and continuous work in perfecting the technique of tap dancing.

3501, 3502, 3503. Independent Study in Dance (1,2,3) (F) (S) (SS) (GE:FA) May be repeated for a maximum of 4 s.h. credit with a change of topic. P: Consent of instructor and department chair. Independent study of a scholarly topic related to dance.

3601, 3602, 3603. Selected Topics in Dance (1,2,3) (F) (S) (SS) (GE:FA) May be repeated for a maximum of 4 s.h. credit with a change of topic. P: Consent of instructor and department chair. Intensive study of selected topics related to dance.

4000, 4001. Special Dance Projects (1,1) 6 hours per week. P: Consent of instructor. Practical experience in various areas of dance performance directed and supervised by the faculty.

4011. Pointe Technique V (1) 2 hours per week. P: DNCE 3021 or consent of instructor. Progressive and continued work in perfecting technique of pointe combinations and classical ballet variations.

4021. Pointe Technique VI (1) 2 hours per week. P: DNCE 4011 or consent of instructor. Progressive and continued work in perfecting technique of pointe combinations and classical ballet variations.

4044. History of Dance I (3) (WI) (F) (GE:FA) Explores dance as a ritual and as theatrical art.

4045. History of Dance II (3) (WI) (S) (GE:FA) Explores the development of dance as theatrical art.

4046. Composition I (3) (WI) (F) P: 3000‑level DNCE technique classes. Explores movement possibilities through kinesthetic awareness and shapes creative intuition through problem‑solving in choreographic design.

4047. Composition II (3) (WI) (S) P: DNCE 4046. Provides the student with an opportunity to develop a choreographic idea.

4048. Choreography Project (3) 9 hours per week. P: DNCE 4047 or consent of instructor. Development, presentation, and evaluation of choreographic projects.

4071. Ballet VII (3)  P: DNCE 3061 or consent of instructor. Continued study in the perfection of technique.

4072. Contemporary Dance VII (3) P: DNCE 3062 or consent of instructor. Continued study in the perfection of technique and style.

4073. Jazz Dance VII (3) 6 hours per week. P: DNCE 3063. Continued work in perfection of jazz technique.

4074, 4075. Tap Dance Development Technique I, II (1,1) 2 hours per week. P: Placement by faculty jury only. Progressive and continuous work in perfecting technique and styles in tap dance.

4081. Ballet VIII (3) P: DNCE 4071 or consent of instructor. Continued study in the perfection of technique.

4082. Contemporary Dance VIII (3) P: DNCE 4072 or consent of instructor. Continued study in the perfection of technique and style.

4083. Jazz Dance VIII (3) 6 hours per week. P: DNCE 4073. Continued work in perfection of jazz technique.

4323. Perspectives on Dance Education, Grades K‑12 (3) (WI) (F) (S) P: Consent of instructor. Theoretical foundations in dance education and their implications for curriculum and teaching.

4324. Internship in Dance Education (10) (F) (S) Full-time, semester-long internship. P: Admission to upper division; C: DNCE 4325. Supervised internship in dance education in the public schools.

4325. Internship Seminar: Issues in Dance Education (1) (F) (S) P: Admission to upper division; C: DNCE 4324. Individualized study of problems or issues in dance education.

DNCE Banked Courses

2051, 2061, 2071, 2081. Ballet Studio I, II, III, IV (1 each)
2052, 2062, 2072, 2082. Contemporary Dance Studio I, II, III, IV (1 each)
2053, 2063, 2073, 2083. Jazz Dance Studio I, II, III, IV (1 each)
4031, 4041, 4051, 4061. Ballet Studio V, VI, VII, VIII (1 each)


ECU Undergraduate Catalog 2000-2001