ECU Undergraduate Catalog 2000-2001
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GERM: GERMAN

1001. German Level I (3) (F) (S) Lab work required. Recommended early in college career for BA students and potential GERM majors and minors. First of a four-course sequence. Intensive training in the basic skills of understanding, speaking, reading, and writing German, with focus on the life and culture of the German‑speaking world.

1002. German Level II (3) (F) (S)  Lab work required. Recommended early in college career for BA students and potential GERM majors and minors. P: GERM 1001 or placement in 1002 by German placement test. Second of a four-course sequence. Further intensive training in the basic skills of understanding, speaking, reading, and writing German, with focus on the life and culture of the German‑speaking world.

1003. German Level III (3) (F) (S) Lab work required. Recommended early in college career for BA students and potential GERM majors and minors. P: GERM 1002 or placement in 1003 by German placement test. Third of a four-course sequence. Intensive training leading to more advanced levels of achievement in understanding, speaking, reading, and writing German, with focus on the life and culture of the German‑speaking world.

1004. German Level IV (3) (F) (S) Lab work may be required. Recommended early in college career for BA students and potential GERM majors and minors. P: GERM 1003 or placement in 1004 by German placement test. fourth of a four-course sequence. Further intensive training leading to intermediate‑level proficiency in understanding, speaking, reading, and writing German. Readings and discussions are designed to further acquaint the student with the life, literature, and culture of the German‑speaking world.

2420. Culture of the German-Speaking World I (3) (F) (Formerly GERM 2120) P: GERM 1004 or consent of department chair. Introduction to selected contemporary aspects of the cultures of the German-speaking world through the reading and discussion of selected texts.

2421. Culture of the German-Speaking World II (3) (S) P: GERM 1004 or consent of department chair. Introduction to aspects of the cultures of the German-speaking world within their historical contexts through the reading and discussion of selected texts.

2611. Early Experiences for the Prospective Teacher (1) (S) (Formerly GERM 2123)  Minimum of 16 hours of directed observations and planned participation in appropriate school environments and 8 hours of seminar class instruction in the teaching area. May not count toward BA or BS professional major or minor. Introduction to the teaching of German designed for prospective teachers.

2700. Special Topics in German Studies (3) (S02) P: GERM 1004 or consent of department chair. Selected topics relating to the language, literature, culture or civilization of a German-speaking country. Topics will vary.

3110. German Business Communication (3)(F02) (Formerly GERM 3005) P: GERM 2420, 2421; or equivalent. Working knowledge of oral and written German as used in the business world. Prepares the student to deal effectively with business German in the United States and abroad.

3210. Conversation (3) (F01) (Formerly GERM 2200) P: GERM 2420, 2421; or consent of department chair. Emphasis on direct and systematic use of the spoken language. Intensive approach aimed at developing a functional level of communication in German.

3330. Composition and Advanced Grammar (3) (S03) (Formerly GERM 3200)  P: GERM 2420, 2421; or consent of department chair. Introduction to principles of effective writing in German and advanced review of grammar with emphasis on syntax, forms, and usage.

3350. Introduction to Translation Studies (3) (WI) (Formerly GERM 3100) P: GERM 2420, 2421; or consent of department chair. For students of all disciplines who expect to do specialized reading or research work in German. Translating skills from German to English, with emphasis on grammar and style, approaches to vocabulary learning, and decoding difficult structures. Readings from areas of general knowledge.

3510. Introduction to German Literature (3) (S) (GE:HU) (Formerly GERM 2300) P: GERM 2420, 2421; or consent of department chair. Development of reading skills necessary for the understanding of genre, concepts of literary structure, and criticism through analysis of selected writings.

3520. The German-Speaking World from the Beginning through the Eighteenth Century (3) (F02) P: GERM 3510 or consent of department chair.  Study of the German-speaking world from its origins through the eighteenth century with emphasis on literary masterpieces

3530. The German-Speaking World of the Nineteenth Century (3) (S03)  P: GERM 3510 or consent of department chair. Study of the German-speaking world of the nineteenth century with emphasis on literary masterpieces.

3540. The German-Speaking World from 1900 to 1945 (3) (F03) P: GERM 3510 or consent of department chair. Study of the German-speaking world from 1900 to 1945 with emphasis on literary masterpieces.

3550. The Contemporary German-Speaking World (3) (S04) P: GERM 3510 or consent of department chair. Study of the contemporary German-speaking world with emphasis on literary masterpieces.

3700. Special Topics (3) (F04) May be repeated for a maximum of 6 s.h. with change of subject. P: GERM 3510 or consent of department chair. Selected topics relating to the language, literature, culture or civilization of a German-speaking country. Topics will vary.

4350. Phonetics and the History of the German Language (3)(S05) (Formerly GERM 3300) P: GERM 3200 or consent of department chair. Introduction to Germanic linguistics and history of German language, with emphasis on the phonetics of modern German.

4611. Teaching Second Languages in Grades K-12 (5) (F) (Formerly GERM 4323) 5 lectures per week and 10 lab hours per semester. Includes 10 hours of field experience. May not count toward BA or BS professional major or minor. P: 18 s.h. above GERM 1004 or consent of instructor. Modern methodologies, techniques and strategies, instructional resources, and evaluation procedures for teaching second languages in grades K-12.

4880. Internship in German (10) (Formerly GERM 4324) Full-time, semester-long internship. P: Admission to upper division; GERM 3200, 3330, 3510; 6 s.h. GERM literature above 2999; 9 s.h. GERM electives above 2999. Observation and supervised internship in an assigned German K-12 public school classroom.

4881. Internship Seminar: Issues in German Teaching (1) (Formerly GERM 4325) P: Admission to upper division; C: GERM 4880. Individualized study of problems or issues related to teaching German.

4882. Internship for Professions (3) (S) (F) P: Consent of department chair. Supervised internship during the junior or senior year of the German degree program in an appropriate professional setting. Fields may include but are not limited to business and industry.

4950, 4951, 4952, 4953, 4954. Directed Readings in German (1 each) (Formerly GERM 4521, 4522, 4523, 4524, 4525)  P: Consent of department chair. Indepth exploration of a selected aspect of German culture (literature, civilization, etc.)

4990. Honors (3) Open to students having a minimum GPA of 3.5 in German. Independent study under the direction of a faculty member in the student’s major area of interest. Research paper required.

5700. Selected Topics (3) (S) (Formerly GERM 5521) P: Consent of department chair. May be repeated for a maximum of 6 s.h. with change of topic. Selected topics relating to the language, literature, culture or civilization of a German-speaking country. Topics will vary.

GERM Banked Courses

1050. Introduction to German Lyric Literature (3)
2100. German Conversation (3)
2220. Modern German Drama in Translation: The Theatre in Protest (3)
3400. German Drama (3)
3500. Nineteenth Century Prose: The Novella (3) 
3600. German Poetry (3)
4100. The Modern German Novel (3) 
4319. Teaching Foreign Languages in the Middle Grades (3)
4361. German Literature of the Eighteenth Century (3)
4362. The Classic Period (3)
4363. German Romanticism (ca. 1790 - ca. 1830) (3)
4387. The Baroque Era (ca. 1600 - ca. 1750) (3)

GERO: GERONTOLOGY

2400. Introduction to Gerontology (3) (GE:SO) Same as CDFR 2400, SOCW 2400. May count toward either the SOCI major or minor or general education social science requirement. Survey of current theory and research in the gerontology field presented from an interdisciplinary perspective.

5011. Perspectives on Death and Dying (3) Same as NURS 5011, SOCW 5011. P: Graduate- or senior-level standing or consent of instructor. Designed to assist the student in understanding the conditions and problems associated with facing death, dying, and survivorship and to increase awareness of value and attitudes as they relate to professional practice.

5400. Seminar in Aging Studies (3)  Same as SOCW 5400. P: Consent of instructor. Entry point for the graduate certificate in GERO and exit course for the undergraduate minor degree in GERO. Topics include a historical perspective in aging issues, normal aging and aging pathology, aging program administration, aging policy development, research in gerontology, rural aging, and aging and ethnicity.

5901, 5902, 5903. Readings in Aging Studies (1,2,or3)  Same as CDFR 5901, 5902, 5903 and SOCW 5901, 5902, 5903. May count a maximum of 3 s.h. toward the graduate certificate in GERO or baccalaureate minor in GERO. P: Consent of instructor and chairperson of instructor's home unit, if applicable. Selected readings taken from monographs or journals in gerontology or aging studies. Focus on specialized areas in which the student has already taken one or more courses in either the graduate certificate in gerontology or the baccalaureate minor in gerontology.

GERO Banked Courses

4600, 4601. Practicum in Gerontology (3,3)

GRK: GREEK

The following courses will satisfy the general education humanities requirement: GRK 2021, 2022.

1001. Ancient Greek Level I (3) (F) (S) First of a two-course sequence. Training in the principles of Greek grammar with an emphasis on reading skills. Correct pronunciation taught, but no other oral skills required. All communication in English.

1002. Ancient Greek Level II (3) (S) P: GRK 1001 or consent of instructor. Second of a two-course sequence. Completion of basic skills of Greek grammar. Elementary readings introduced, adjusted to the level of the student.

1003. Ancient Greek Level III (3) (F) P: GRK 1002 or consent of instructor. Intensive review and application of basic skills of grammar acquired in GRK 1001-1002. Development of reading skills through the works of a major author such as Plato, Xenophon, or Lysias.

1004. Ancient Greek Level IV (3) (S) P: GRK 1003 or consent of instructor. Continued development of reading skills and introduction to critical approaches to literature. Readings in poetry from the plays of Euripides.

2021. Homer and Hesiod (3) P: GRK 1004 or consent of instructor. Selected readings in ancient Greek from Homer's Iliad and Odyssey and from Hesiod's Works and Days and Theogony.

2022. Age of Herodotus (3) P: GRK 2021 or consent of instructor. Readings in ancient Greek from Herodotus' Histories, the plays of Sophocles and Aristophanes, and from the dialogues of Plato.

4521, 4522, 4523. Directed Readings in Greek (1,2,3) May be repeated. P: Consent of instructor. Indepth exploration of a selected aspect of Greek culture (literature, civilization, etc.).

GRPH: GRAPHICS

GRPH Banked Courses

2142, 2143. Photo-Offset Lithography (3,0)
3040. Graphics Art III (3)
4040, 4041. Advanced Lithographic Practices (3,0)
5501. Independent Study: Visual Communications (3)

HESC: HUMAN ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES

2126. Consumer Affairs (3) The consumer in the market place; bases for decision making, consumption patterns, and trends; consumer information and protection.

3990, 3991, 3992. Field Experience in Human Environmental Sciences (1,1,1) (F) (S) (SS) May not be substituted for other required internships. P: HESC major or minor; minimum cumulative 2.0 GPA; minimum 2.5 GPA in HESC; 6 s.h. in applicable human environmental sciences area; consent of dean. Supervised professional work experience in the area of the student's major or minor.

3999. Issues in Human Environmental Sciences (3) (F) (S) (SS) P: Junior standing and HESC major. Introduces current issues in human environmental sciences; demonstrates methodologies and approaches to resolving these issues in an integrative fashion.

4500, 4501, 4502. Independent Study (3,3,3) (F) (S) (SS) Problems in one or more of the following areas of human environmental sciences: child development, family relations, food, nutrition, hospitality management, consumer economics, family resource management, apparel, textiles, or interior design.

4521. Readings in Human Environmental Sciences (1) (F) (S) (SS) Opportunity for independent study in areas of student's special interest.

4999. Professional Development in Human Environmental Sciences (3) (F) (S) (SS) P: Junior- or senior-level standing; HESC major; HESC 3999. Tools and strategies for evaluating and determining responsible professional behavior in dynamic situations. Emphasis on an integrated, cooperative professional framework for problem solving with a strong application component.

5005, 5006, 5007. Special Problems in Human Environmental Sciences (1,2,3) (F) (S) (SS) Same as FACS 5005, 5006, 5007. May be repeated for credit with a change of topic. P: Consent of instructor. Special topics in selected areas of human environmental sciences. Variable titles and content permitted.

HIMA: HEALTH INFORMATION MANAGEMENT

2000. Introduction to Health Information Management (2) (F) Introduction to the health information management profession.

3000. Introduction to Medical Terminology (2) (F) (S) (SS) May not count toward HIMA major. Introductory study of the language of medicine focusing upon the building of a medical vocabulary through the use of word components.

3013. Applied Medical Sciences I (3) (F) P: HIMA major; BIOL 2130, 2131; SPCH 2520; C: HIMA 3041. The first of a 2-semester sequence. Integrated study of the language of medicine, pathophysiology, and the diagnostic and treatment modalities utilized in clinical medical practice.

3018. Applied Medical Sciences II (3) (S) P: HIMA 3013; C: HIMA 3046, 3048.  Continuation of HIMA 3013.

3020. Health Care Delivery Systems (1) (F) P: HIMA major; SPCH 2520; C: HIMA 3032. Overview of the continuum of care in the health care industry, including historical development, organizational structure, and regulatory and accrediting bodies.

3022. Professionalism in Health Information Management (1) (F) P: HIMA major. Introduction to ethics, professional code of ethics, professionalism, and professional service.

3025. Legal Aspects of Health Records (3) (WI) (S) P: ENGL 3880 or ITEC 3290; HIMA 3013, 3020, 3032. Principles of law, ethics, regulation, and accrediting standards as applied to health records.

3028. Health Care Reimbursement (1) (S) P: HIMA 3020; C: HIMA 3048. Reimbursement in non-acute settings and physician practices with emphasis on federal regulations.

3032. Record Documentation Systems (3) (F) P: HIMA major; SPCH 2520; C: HIMA 3020. Study of the origin, content, and format of health records across the continuum of care.

3038. Health Data Structures (1) (S) P: HIMA 3013, 3032. Technical standards for health data structures and knowledge representation and content for computer-based health records systems are emphasized.

3041. Diagnostic and Procedural Coding I (2) (F) P: HIMA major; BIOL 2130, 2131; C: HIMA 3013. Coding of diseases and procedures according to the International Classification of Diseases. Study of federal regulations as they relate to reimbursement.

3046. Diagnostic and Procedural Coding II (2) (S) P: HIMA 3041; C: HIMA 3018. Continuation of HIMA 3041.

3048. Health Service Coding (1) (S) P: HIMA 3013, 3020; C: HIMA 3018, 3028. Coding services and procedures according to the Health Care Financing Administration's Common Procedure Coding System.

3090. Professional Practice Experience I (1) (S) P: ASIP 3228 or MGMT 3202; ASIP 4500; ENGL 3880 or ITEC 3290; HIMA 3022, 3032, 3041. Supervised learning experiences in health information services departments. Designed to strengthen the student's competence in the didactic information related to the acute care setting.

4000. Professional Practice Experience II (1) (F) P: HIMA 3090. Continuation of HIMA 3090.

4028. Topics in Health Information Management (1) (S) P: HIMA 3038, 3041, 3048, 4000, 4050. Provides students the opportunity to study new and advanced topics in health information management.

4030. Quality Management in Health Care (2) (F) P: HIMA 3018, 3025. Application of the principles of quality management across the continuum of care.

4046. Clinical Issues (1) (S) P: HIMA 3028, 3046. Addresses complex issues in coding using the International Classification of Diseases with emphasis on reimbursement and automation.

4050. Human Resource Management (2) (F) P: ASIP 3228 or MGMT 3202; HIMA 3025; MGMT 4242 or PSYC 3241; C: HIMA 4052. Management, procurement, development, maintenance, compensation, and utilization of an effective work force in the health information services department.

4052. Management of Health Information Services Department (2) (WI) (F) P: ASIP 2311, 2312; HIMA 3090; C: HIMA 4050. Theoretical and practical applications of the managerial functions of planning, organizing, and controlling in a health information services department.

4055. Human Resource Management Seminar (1) (S) P: HIMA 4050; C: HIMA 4057. Examination of complex problems in human resource management.

4057. Management of Health Information Services Department Seminar (1) (S) P: HIMA 4052; C: HIMA 4055. Examination of complex problems in the management of health information services departments.

4060. Concepts in Health Information Technology (4) (F) P: ASIP 2112, 2212, 2213; or DSCI 2223; HIMA 3090. Overview of the major concepts of computer hardware, architecture, operating systems, and application software, including issues relating to data and databases. Ability to use selected general purpose microcomputer applications will also be reinforced.

4065. Health Information Systems (2) (S)  P: HIMA 4060; C: HIMA 4075. Examination of how computing supports health care by gathering, recording, interpreting, and transmitting data.

4075. Biomedical Research Support (1) (S) P: HIMA 4060; MATH 2228 or 2283 or PSYC 2101; C: HIMA 4065. Study of design concepts and information systems to support research in biomedical and health services.

4081, 4082, 4083. Directed Independent Project (1,2,3) (F) (S) (SS) Hours vary by project.  May be repeated for a maximum of 6 s.h. with change of topic. P: HIMA major and consent of instructor. Selected project on new and advanced issue in health information practice.  May include readings, research, or field work.

4090. Capstone Professional Practice Experience (5) (S) P: All required HIMA major courses. Supervised learning experiences on a full-time basis at selected affiliated organizations with emphasis on administration and management.

HIST: HISTORY

1030. World Civilizations to 1500 (3) (WI*) (F) (S) (GE:SO) May receive credit for only one of HIST 1030, 1552. Evolution of world civilizations from prehistory to 1500.

1031. World Civilizations Since 1500 (3) (WI*) (F) (S) (GE:SO) May receive credit for only one of HIST 1031, 1553. World civilizations since 1500 and their economic, social, cultural, and political development.

1050. American History to 1877 (3) (WI*) (F) (S) (GE:SO) May receive credit for only one of HIST 1050, 1550. History of the United States from the discovery of America in 1492 to the end of Reconstruction.

1051. American History Since 1877 (3) (WI*) (F) (S) (GE:SO) May receive credit for only one of HIST 1051, 1551. History of the United States from Reconstruction to the present.

1550. Honors, American History to 1877 (3) (F) (GE:SO) May receive credit for only one of HIST 1050, 1550. P: By invitation or consent of instructor. History of the United States from the discovery of America in 1492 to the end of Reconstruction.

1551. Honors, American History Since 1877 (3) (WI*) (S) (GE:SO) May receive credit for only one of HIST 1051, 1551. P: By invitation or consent of instructor. History of the United States from Reconstruction to the present.

1552. Honors, World History to 1500 (3) (F) (GE:SO) May receive credit for only one of HIST 1030, 1552. P: By invitation or consent of instructor. Evolution of world civilizations from prehistory to 1500.

1553. Honors, History of Europe Since 1500 (3) (S) (GE:SO) May receive credit for only one of HIST 1031, 1553. P: By invitation or consent of instructor. World civilizations since 1500 and their economic, social, cultural, and political development.

2012. American Business History (3) (WI*) (F) (GE:SO) Study of the history of business in America, with an emphasis upon the evolution of business structure and function.

2123. Early Experiences for the Prospective Teacher (1) (F) (S) Minimum of 16 hours of directed observations and planned participation in appropriate school environments and 8 hours of seminar class instruction in the teaching area. May not count toward a BA major or minor. P: 6 s.h. in HIST and 6 s.h. in other social sciences.  Introduction to the teaching of history and social studies designed for prospective teachers.

2222. Western Europe Since 1500 (3) (F) (GE:SO) History of Western Europe from the Age of Discovery to the present, emphasizing the development and growth of the nation state system using Spain, France, England, and Germany as examples.

2444. The History of Sports in Western Society (3) (F) (GE:SO) Examination of the role of sports from the ancient Greeks to the twentieth century, with focus on how sports mirror historical developments, as well as social and cultural trends.

3000. History: Its Nature and Method (3) (WI*) (F) (S) (GE:SO) P: 6 s.h. in HIST. Introduction to historical thought, historical method, and the varieties and uses of history.

3005. Selected Topics in History (3) (WI*)  (GE:SO) May be repeated for credit with change of topic. May count 3 s.h. toward HIST major or minor. Study of selected topics from the perspective of history.

3010. Constitutional History of the United States to 1888 (3) (GE:SO) Study of the constitutional development of the United States from the colonial period through the Waite Court.

3011. Constitutional History of the United States Since 1888 (3) (GE:SO) Study of the constitutional evolution of the United States that emphasizes the Supreme Court's response to industrial developments, politics, war, and civil liberties.

3031. Economic History of the United States Since 1865 (3) (GE:SO) Survey of the economic development of the United States since the Civil War.

3100. North Carolina History (3) (F) (S) (GE:SO) Not open to history majors and minors. Political, social, and economic developments in North Carolina from the colonial era to the present.

3110. History of African-Americans (3) (F) (GE:SO) Narrative account of African-Americans in America from 1619 to the present, with a brief consideration of African origins and heritage. Political, economic, and legal as well as the cultural and intellectual aspects of the African-American experience will be explored.

3121. American Military History to 1900 (3) (F) (GE:SO) May not be taken by students who have successfully completed HIST 3120. History of military thought and institutions in the US from the era of the American Revolution through the nineteenth century.  Emphasizes the interrelationship between war and society by studying the political, economic, and social aspects of military affairs.

3122. American Military History Since 1900 (3) (S) (GE:SO) May not be taken by students who have successfully completed HIST 3120. History of American military thought and institutions since 1900.  Emphasizes the interrelationship between war and society by studying the political, economic, and social aspects of military affairs.

3130. Problems in American History (3) Principal turning points in American history with emphasis on varying interpretations.

3140. Women in American History (3) (F) (S) (GE:SO) Exploration of the variety of women's experience in American history and of the role of women in the nation's social, economic, political, and cultural development.

3200. Diplomatic History of the United States (3) (WI*) (GE:SO) American diplomatic history from 1776 to the present with emphasis on major episodes, policies, and personalities.

3205. History of American Urban Life (3) (GE:SO) May not receive credit for both HIST 3205 and 5210. Historical assessment of the importance of the American city in US history.

3210. Colonial America to 1763 (3) (WI*)  (GE:SO) Discovery and settlement of North America by Europeans and the evolution of the English colonies to the era of the American Revolution.

3215. American Revolution and the Federal Era, 1763‑1800 (3) (WI*) (GE:SO) Military and political history of the War for Independence, the problem of constructing a new nation as a union of states, the making and ratification of the Federal Constitution, and the rise of political parties during the Federal Era.

3225. The Era of Sectionalism and Civil War, 1848‑1877 (3)  (GE:SO) Describes the rise of sectionalism and covers in detail the events of the Civil War and Reconstruction.

3230. The Birth of Modern America, 1865‑1892 (3) (WI*) (GE:SO) Major historical trends in the United States from the end of the Civil War to the 1890s.

3235. The Era of Populism and Progressivism in American History, 1892‑1919 (3) (GE:SO) United States history from 1892 to 1919 which compares the Populist and Progressive movements and shows the emergence of the United States as a world power.

3240. The Age of Franklin Roosevelt, 1919‑1945 (3) (WI*)  (GE:SO) Study of the United States centering upon the politics and society of the 1920s, the Great Depression, the New Deal, and the background and impact of World War II.

3245. The United States Since 1945 (3) (WI*) (F) (GE:SO) Study of the United States since 1945, centering upon the economics, politics, and society of the United States from the Truman years to the present.

3300. History of American Rural Life (3) (F) (GE:SO) Introduction to history of rural America, pre-contact to present. Includes regional development of agricultural economy, agrarian ideology, myths and realities of the family farm, farm protest and public policy, and representations of American rural life in literature, music, and film.

3333. Biography and History (3) (GE:SO) May be repeated for credit with change of topic. A maximum of 3 s.h. may count toward HIST major or minor. A study of selected influential people and their impact on society.

3405. History of Ancient Greece to 146 BC (3) (GE:SO) Examination of political, social, and cultural developments in Greece from 800 BC to 146 BC.

3406. War and Society in Ancient Greece and Rome (3) (F) (GE:SO) Warfare and society in ancient Greece and Rome.

3410. History of Ancient Rome (3) (F) (GE:SO) Examination of political, social, and cultural developments in Rome from 753 BC to 476 AD.

3412. A History of Christianity to 1300 (3) (GE:SO) Survey of the formation and evolution of the institutional church and its role in society from its origins to the Renaissance. Special Attention will be paid to the historical interaction between Mediterranean and trans-Alpine cultures.

3415. The Middle Ages (3) (F) (GE:SO) Study of major aspects of the political, social, economic, and cultural history of the Middle Ages from the third to the sixteenth centuries.

3420. Early Modern Europe to 1648 (3) (F) (GE:SO) Political, social, and intellectual transformation that marked the beginnings of modern European history.

3430. History of Europe, 1815‑1914 (3) (F) (GE:SO) Survey of Europe from the Congress of Vienna to the outbreak of the first world war, with emphasis on the political, social, and economic developments of the period.

3435. History of Europe Since 1914 (3) (GE:SO) Transformations in European society and institutions from the outbreak of the first world war to the present.

3444. The Old Regime, French Revolution, and Napoleon (3) Study of royal and constitutional absolutism, the Enlightenment, the French Revolution, and Napoleon.

3450. History of Modern Germany (3) (GE:SO) Examination of the political, social, economic, and cultural evolution  of the German nation over the past 300 years, with special emphasis on the rise of Nazism and the issue of the German role in the two world wars.

3480. English History to 1603 (3) (GE:SO) Political, social, and economic development of England from the Roman conquest to the death of Elizabeth I.

3481. English History Since 1603 (3) (GE:SO) Political, social, and economic development of the British people from 1603 to the present.

3487. Constitutional History of England (3) (GE:SO) Evolution of the English government and its institutions from Anglo‑Saxon times to the present.

3550. History of Russia to 1917 (3) (F) (GE:SO) Rise of the Russian state from the migration of the Slavic tribes to the formation of the Soviet Union with Attention to the land and peoples as well as the government and policy.

3610. History of the Far East to 1600 (3) (GE:SO) Analysis of the contrasting religions, life‑styles, and institutions of the major civilizations of traditional Asia, with emphasis given to China and Japan.

3611. History of the Far East Since 1600 (3) (GE:SO) Analysis of the main themes of modern Asian history, with particular Attention given to the revolutionary impact of the West on the civilizations of China, Japan, and Southeast Asia (including Vietnam).

3620. History of Modern Japan (3) (F) (GE:SO) Analysis of the transformation of Japanese culture under the influence of the West, with particular Attention to the causes and consequences of modernization.

3630. History of Modern China (3) (GE:SO) Analysis of the factors responsible for the collapse of China's traditional Confucian culture and the triumph of communism. Particular Attention will be given to the role of the West in this revolutionary transformation.

3670. History of the Middle East (3) (WI*) (GE:SO) Comparative survey of the people, the land, and the religious groups of the Middle East. Particular emphasis will be given to Islam and imperialism.

3710. Introduction to Latin-American History: Colonial Period (3) (WI*) (GE:SO) Establishment and administration of the Spanish and Portuguese colonies in the New World, 1492‑1808.

3711. Introduction to Latin-American History: Since 1808 (3) (WI*) (GE:SO) Wars of Independence, followed by surveys of the Latin-American nations since independence. Particular Attention is paid to the growth of republican institutions, social organizations, and economic and cultural developments.

3760.  The ABC Powers: Argentina, Brazil, Chile (3) (GE:SO) Major developments in the republics of Argentina, Brazil, and Chile since independence. Emphasis on the conservative-liberal struggle, the development of democratic institutions, and economic changes.

3780. Mexico and Central America (3) (WI*) (GE:SO) Major developments in the history of Mexico and the Central American republics.

3810. History of Africa (3) (WI*) (F) (GE:SO) Survey of Africa which emphasizes precolonial African societies, interactions between African societies and Europeans during the colonial era, and the African quest for independence.

3900. Introduction to Public History (3) (F) May not count toward the BS in HIST. Introduction to the meaning and various aspects and practices of public history with emphasis on reading, discussion, and fieldwork projects.

3920. Social History of American Medicine (3) (S) (GE:SO) Examination of the development of medical ideas and practices and of the healing professions in America. Special Attention will be paid to the changing interactions between medicine and society.

3993. Approaches to Historical Objects (3) Situating and interpreting material objects historically. Social, cultural, political, and intellectual implications of classifying, conserving, and displaying historical objects.  Topics will include artifacts, archives, monuments, cultural policy, commercial history, and historical memory.

4319. Teaching Social Studies in the Middle Grades (3) (F) 10 to 12 hours of field experience. May not count toward BA or BS in HIST major or minor. P: Admission to upper division; EDUC 3200; MIDG 3001, 3010, 3022; 18 s.h. in social sciences; or consent of instructor; C: MIDG 4001, 4010; ENGL or SCIE or MIDG 4319; or consent of instructor. Teaching strategies, instructional resources, and evaluation procedures for teaching the social studies in middle grades.

4323. The Teaching of Social Studies in High School (3) (F) May not count toward BA major or minor. Materials and basic teaching strategies employed in the high school social studies classroom.

4324. Internship in History and Social Studies (10) (S) Full-time, semester-long internship. P: Admission to upper division; C: HIST 4325. Internship in an assigned school under the direction of a clinical teacher and a university supervisor. Students must file application in the year before the one in which they plan to teach.

4325. Internship Seminar: Issues in Social Studies Education (0) (S) P: Admission to upper division; C: HIST 4324. Individualized study of problems or issues related to social studies education.

4444. Studies in French History (3) May be repeated with a change of topic. May count a maximum of 3 s.h. toward HIST major or minor. Selected topics in French history from the Middle Ages to the present day.  Topics vary.

4531, 4532, 4533. Directed Readings in History (1,2,3) (F) (S) (GE:SO) May not count toward history minor. May count 3 s.h. toward HIST major. P: Consent of department chair. Intensive examination of a specific field of interest to the individual student.

4550, 4551. Honors (3,3) (F) (S) (GE:SO) Students working closely with a professor in their major area of interest undertake an independent reading and research program.

4610. History of Southeast Asia (3) (GE:SO) Analysis of the evolution of modern Southeast Asia, with particular emphasis on the transformation of traditional cultures under the impact of western colonial rule.

4940, 4941, 4942. Internship in Archives and Historical Records Administration (3,6,9) (F) (S) 140 hours for 3 s.h., 280 hours for 6 s.h., 420 hours for 9 s.h. May not count toward HIST major or minor elective requirements above 2999. Maximum of 3 s.h. in HIST 4940-4948 may count toward HIST requirement for BS or minor in public history.  P: Senior standing; minimum cumulative 2.2 GPA; minimum 2.5 GPA in HIST; consent of instructor. Practical field experience under supervision in archival and manuscript agencies.

4943, 4944, 4945. Internship in Museum Administration (3,6,9) (F) (S) 140 hours for 3 s.h., 280 hours for 6 s.h., 420 hours for 9 s.h. May not count toward HIST major or minor elective requirements above 2999. Maximum of 3 s.h. in HIST 4940-4948 may count toward HIST requirement for BS or minor in public history.  P: Senior standing; minimum cumulative 2.2 GPA; minimum 2.5 GPA in HIST; consent of instructor. Practical field experience under supervision in museums.

4946, 4947, 4948. Internship in Historic Site Administration (3,6,9) (F) (S) 140 hours for 3 s.h., 280 hours for 6 s.h., 420 hours for 9 s.h. May not count toward HIST major or minor elective requirements above 2999. Maximum of 3 s.h. in HIST 4940-4948 may count toward HIST requirement for BS or minor in public history.  P: Senior standing; minimum cumulative 2.2 GPA; minimum 2.5 GPA in HIST; consent of instructor. Practical field experience under supervision in historical sites.

5005. Selected Topics in History (3) (F) (S) (WI*) May be repeated for credit with change of topic. May count 3 s.h. toward graduate or undergraduate HIST major or minor. Intensive study of selected topics from a historical perspective.

5122. Social and Cultural History of the United States Since 1865 (3) Selective treatment of the main currents in American thought, involving social and intellectual activity since 1865.

5125. American Political Development in the Nineteenth Century (3) Evolution of major political party conflict from the mellowing of the first party system to the realignment of the 1890s.

5130. Comparative History of New World Slavery and Race Relations (3) (WI*) Comparative perspectives on the origin and development of slavery and race relations in the United States and various societies in the Western Hemisphere.

5135. Problems in North Carolina History (3) (WI*) (F) P: HIST 1050, 1051; or consent of instructor. Process by which North Carolina evolved from an isolated English colony into a part of the modern US. Emphasis on bibliographic work. Research in archival and manuscript sources required.

5140. The Old South (3) (F) Development of the southern US to the outbreak of the Civil War.

5141. The South Since 1877 (3) (WI*) Development of the southern United States from the end of the Civil War to recent years.

5220. Selected Topics in US Women's History (3) (S) Indepth exploration of selected topics in US women's history including analysis of major themes, documents, and theoretical work.

5230. Themes in African-American History (3) (S) Intensive examination of pivotal themes and writings in African American history.

5300. Comparative History of Non‑Western Civilizations (3) (WI*) May not count toward 3 s.h. 5000‑level requirement for HIST majors. Survey of the historical evolution of the major civilizations of Asia, Africa, and the Middle East, with emphasis on the comparative cultural foundations of the civilizations studied.

5310. Intellectual History of Europe (3) Major themes of the intellectual history of modern Europe; an analysis of selected readings from representative nineteenth and twentieth century thinkers.

5340. The Ancient Near East (3) Near east civilizations from the lower paleolithic age to the conquest of Persia by Alexander the Great.

5350. The Renaissance in European History (3) (S) Study of the cultural and intellectual developments of western Europe from about 1300 to about 1600.

5360. The Reformation, 1450‑1598 (3) Developments in European history from 1450 to 1598. Renaissance materials will be included only as background.

5440. Twentieth Century England (3) England in the two great wars–World Wars I and II; the coming of socialism, its results; the breakup of the British Empire, the British Commonwealth of Nations; and English development since 1945.

5450. Tudor‑Stuart England (3) Emergence of England into a position of world leadership and the internal developments which shaped the political, economic, and social life of its people in the sixteenth, seventeenth, and early eighteenth centuries.

5470. History of Soviet Russia Since 1917 (3)  Russian revolutions of 1917 and the rise of the Soviet Union to super‑power status in the world.

5480. Weimar and the Rise of Hitler (3) Society, culture, and politics of Germany during the Weimar Republic; failure of democracy and establishment of Nazi state.

5505. Maritime History of the Western World to 1415 (3)  Maritime activities in the western world from classical antiquity through the Middle Ages. Emphasis on the development of maritime commerce, piracy, and naval warfare. Designated as a European history course.

5515. Maritime History of the Western World, 1415‑1815 (3) (WI*)  Maritime activities in the Western World from the Age of Discovery to 1815. Emphasis on European voyages of discovery, expansion of maritime commerce, establishment of overseas possessions, and domination of the world's sea lanes. Designated as a European history course.

5520. Maritime History of the Western World Since 1815 (3) Maritime activities in the Western World since 1815 and their impact on political, diplomatic, economic, and military affairs. Emphasis on technology. Designated as an American history course.

5525. Sea Power: 480 BC to the Present (3) (WI*) (F) Survey of the nature of warfare at sea and the changing role of sea power in eras of peace and war from the classical period to the atomic age.

5530. Field School in Maritime History and Underwater Research (2) (S) 20 classroom or lab hours per week. P: Consent of instructor. Early field experience in maritime history and underwater research.

5555. Constitutionalism and Kingship in Early Modern Europe (3) Analysis of royal absolutism as the dominant philosophy in state building in the seventeenth century. Exploration of the role of continental politics and political ideologies in the development of English constitutional government.

5660. Imperialism in Theory and Practice, 1800 to the Present (3) (WI*) European expansion, primarily in Africa and Asia, will be examined from theoretical and empirical perspectives. Political, economic, social, and non‑European origins of imperialism will be analyzed.

5670. A Diplomatic History of Europe, 1815 to the Present (3) Survey of the international relations of the great European powers from 1815 to the present.

5680. Diplomatic History of Modern Asia (3) Analysis of the role of diplomacy in the evolution of modern Asia, with particular Attention given to the conflict between East and West since 1800.

5765. Latin America: 1492 to the Present (3) (WI*) Analysis of selected historical problems in Latin-American society and economy including conquest and settlement, the role of indigenous peoples in the development of Latin-American society, reform and revolution, independence, and organization of nation states.

5910. Introduction to the Administration of Archives and Historical Manuscripts (3) May not count toward 3 s.h. 5000‑level HIST major requirement. Study of the background, preservation, and use of archives and historical manuscripts. Particular emphasis will be placed on the historical evolution of the archival profession and the administration of archives and manuscripts repositories.

5920, 5921. Techniques of Museum and Historic Site Development (3,0) (F) May not count toward 3 s.h. 5000‑level HIST major requirement. Survey of the history and theory of museology and of the techniques of museum and historic site management.

5930, 5931. Field and Laboratory Studies in Museum and Historic Site Development (3,0) May not count toward 3 s.h. 5000‑level HIST major requirement. Development of practical methods for the operation and management of history museums and historic sites.

5950. Introduction to Quantitative History (2) P: 20 s.h. of undergraduate history. Introduction to the categories of quantitative history and the role of the computer and the techniques of its implementation in historical research.

5951. Directed Readings and Research in Quantitative History (1) P: HIST 5950. Intensive examination of a special historical field based on the needs and concerns of the student. Research projects will be limited to quantitative assessments of historical eras following the completion of HIST 5950.

5960. Introduction to Oral History (3) Introduction to the theory and methodology of oral history interviewing and the interpretation of oral history materials, with an emphasis on fieldwork projects.

5970. Living History (3) P: Consent of instructor. Introduction to interpretations of past events, focusing on seventeenth through nineteenth century event specifics, world review, clothing, and accouterments.

5985. Historic Preservation Planning (3) Same as PLAN 5985. Introduction to historic preservation planning. Theoretical, legal, historical, and design bases of preservation planning.

HIST Banked Courses

3030. Economic History of the United States to 1865 (3)
3120. American Military History (3)
3125. A History of World War II in Film (3) 
3220. Continental Expansion of the United States, 1800‑1848 (3)
3910. History of Science (3)
3915. History of Western Medical Thought (3) 
4450. History of Eastern Europe (3)
5120. American Social and Cultural History to 1787 (3)
5121. Social and Cultural History of the United States 1787‑1865 (3)
5150. The American West (3)
5210. History of American Urban Life (3)
5460. History of the Balkans in the Twentieth Century (3)
5770. The Relation of Latin America to World History (3)

HLTH: HEALTH

HLTH 1000 is a prerequisite for all other health courses.

1000. Health in Modern Society (2) (F) (S) (SS) (GE:HL) Investigation of mental, social, and physical health problems related to man's internal and external environments in technological and leisure‑oriented societies.

1357. Health, Physical Education, and Recreation in Modern Society (2) Study of the purposes, scope, and employment possibilities in health, physical education, and recreation.

1800. Orientation to Athletic Training (1) (F) P: Admission to candidacy period of athletic training curriculum. Orientation into the athletic training profession and the principles of observation in allied health settings.

2000. Introduction to Health Education (3) (F) (S) (SS) Overview of health education theory and practice. Emphasizes educational change process; the settings, skills, and outcomes of health and education practice; and the evolving roles of health educators.

2123. Early Experiences for the Prospective Teacher (1) (F) Minimum of 16 hours of directed observations and planned participation in appropriate school environments and 8 clock hours of seminar class instruction in the teaching area. May not count toward a BA major or minor. Introduction to the teaching of health designed for prospective teachers.

2125, 2126. Safety Education and First Aid (3,0) (F) (S) (SS) 2 classroom and 2 lab hours per week. C for 2125: HLTH 2126; C for 2126: HLTH 2125. Study of accident prevention and skills necessary to act in situations where emergency first aid care is needed. Included are skills necessary in situations where cardiopulmonary resuscitation is needed. Successful completion leads to Red Cross certification in standard first aid and personal safety and cardiopulmonary resuscitation.

2220, 2221. Basic Athletic Training (3,0) (S) (SS) C for 2220: HLTH 2221; C for 2221: HLTH 2220. 2 lecture and 2 lab hours per week. Does not meet requirements for National Athletic Trainers' Association Certification.

2290, 2291, 2292. Field Experience in Community Health Education (1,2,3) 50 hours of work experience for each s.h. credit. P: Sophomore standing. Designed to provide early, supervised work experience in community health education practice. Students will participate in a variety of health education activities, including planning, implementing, and evaluating health education programs. A variety of health agencies will be utilized.

2800. Standard Nomenclature of Athletic Injuries (3) (F) Standard nomenclature of athletic injuries focusing on orthopedic and surgical conditions of the active person.

2810. Principles of Athletic Training (3) (S) 2 lecture and 2 lab hours per week. C: Current participation in candidacy aspect of the athletic training program; first aid and CPR certification; HLTH 2811; RC: BIOL 2130, 2131. Fundamental principles of athletic training, including recognition, evaluation, treatment, rehabilitation, and prevention of athletic injuries. Practical clinical evaluation and preventative taping are included.

2811. Principles of Athletic Training (0) (S) 2 lab hours per week. P: Current participation in candidacy period of athletic training program or consent of instructor; first-aid and CPR certification; C: HLTH 2810; RC: BIOL 2130, 2131. Fundamental principles of athletic training, including recognition, evaluation, treatment, rehabilitation, and prevention of athletic injuries. Practical clinical evaluation and prevention taping included.

3000. Theory and Practice in Community Health Education (3) May receive credit for only one of HLTH 3000, 3001. Explores basic behavioral, community organization, educational, and administrative concepts and methodologies of professional practice in community health education.

3001. Principles of Community Health Education (2) (S) May receive credit for only one of HLTH 3000, 3001. Overview of community health education theory and practice. Introduction to the field for majors and nonmajors.

3010. Health Problems I (3) (F) P: BIOL 2130, 2131. Study of current health problems with a focus on the relationship between patterns of individual behavior and the pathophysiology of specific disease states. Emphasis on universal chronic disease states providing the health professional with appropriate rationale for development of primary and secondary intervention strategies.

3020. Health Problems II (3)  (S) May receive credit for only one of HLTH 3020, 4348. P: HLTH 3010 or consent of instructor. Study of current health problems with a focus on the sociocultural and geopolitical conditions which contribute to their causes and solutions.

3030. Health Behavior (3) (WI) (S) P: PSYC 1000. Introduction to the theories and models used by health educators to explain health behaviors.

3040. The Health Education Delivery System (3) P: HLTH 2000. Designed to broaden student understanding and appreciation of the philosophical, legal, and organizational dimensions of health systems within which comprehensive health education is delivered.

3200.  Field Experience in Athletic Training I (1) (F) 1 lecture per week and clinical assignments for the semester. C:  Current participation in the athletic training curriculum; HLTH 3810. Introduction into the field experience in athletic training, including supervised medical coverage of athletics teams. Current first-aid and CPR certifications and proof of medical malpractice insurance are required for the duration of the course.

3225. Standard First Aid and Personal Safety Instructor (2) (F) (S) (SS) 1 lecture and 4 lab hours per week. P: HLTH 2125, 2126; or certification as having completed the American Red Cross advanced first aid course within the past 3 years. Satisfactory completion of the course requirements results in certification as an instructor in standard first aid and personal safety, first aid multimedia systems, and basic first aid.

3244. Practices and Procedures in Health for Elementary School (2) (F) (S) (SS) Required of all elementary education majors. Emphasis on class organization, principles, and practices associated with health education at the elementary level.

3250, 3251. Sports Medicine Treatment Modalities (3,0) (F) 2 lecture and 2 lab hours per week. P: HLTH 3810 or consent of instructor. Indepth study of theory and application of therapeutic modalities in relation to the treatment of athletic injuries.

3280, 3281. Therapeutic Rehabilitation in Sports Medicine (3,0) (S) 2 lecture and 2 lab hours per week. P: HLTH 3250, 3251; or consent of instructor. Indepth study of theory and application of therapeutic rehabilitation of athletic injuries.

3300, 3301. Introduction to Patient Education (3,0) 2 classroom and 3 lab/field-work hours per week. P: HLTH 3000 or consent of instructor. Introduction to theories which apply to the practice of patient education in a variety of health care settings. Emphasis is on education for promotion of health and change of life style.

3515. AIDS HIV Disease in Modern Society (3) (S) P: HLTH 1000 or consent of instructor. Overview of the key issues surrounding the AIDS (Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome) epidemic with focus on social, psychological, political, economic, legal, ethical, and health aspects of this disease.

3810. Etiology and Evaluation of the Trunk and Upper Extremity (3) (F) 4 lecture/lab hours per week. P: HLTH 2810; P/C: BIOL 2130, 2131. Indepth study and practical application of the pathomechanics or sports-related injury and diseases to the trunk and upper extremity.

3820. Etiology and Evaluation of Lower Extremity (3) (S)  4 lecture/lab hours per week. P: HLTH 2810; P/C: BIOL 2130, 2131. Indepth study and practical application of the pathomechanics of sports-related injury and diseases to the lower extremity.

3860. Sports Medicine Practicum I (3) (F) 1 lecture and 15 supervised clinical hours per week. P: Admission to the athletic training program and HLTH 3810. Practical experience in athletics under the supervision of a certified athletic trainer. Current CPR and first-aid certifications and proof of medical malpractice insurance are required for the duration of this practicum.

4000. Methods of Training and Staff Development (4) 4 lecture and skill demonstration hours per week. P: PSYC 3221 or consent of instructor. Study of group and training methodologies in the health setting, with emphasis on need assessment, program implementation, and evaluation of workshops, conferences, and short courses.

4010. Senior Seminar: Tutorial in Health Issues Research (3) (F) (S) 2 1‑hour lectures and 2 2‑hour labs per week. P: Senior standing or school and community health majors only; completion of all core courses; or consent of instructor. Guidance in the development of an investigative study that is appropriate to the individual student's needs and interest.

4100. Community Health Profile (3) P: HLTH 4000 or consent of instructor. Basic concepts and tools for identifying community health education needs. Development of a community health profile for county of internship (HLTH 4990).

4200. Planning and Evaluation in Worksite Health Promotion (3) (F) (S) P: Completion of core courses. Examination of the role of evaluation in worksite health promotion with emphasis on measuring instrument design, evaluation, planning, and interpretation of evaluation results.

4300.  Field Experience in Athletic Training II (1) (F) (S) (SS) 1 lecture per week and clinical assignments for the semester. P: HLTH 3250, 3251, 3810, 3820; C: Current participation in the athletic training curriculum. Field experience in allied health settings relevant to athletic training. Current first-aid and CPR certifications and proof of medical malpractice insurance are required for the duration of the course.

4320. Organization, Administration, and Applied Techniques of Sports Medicine (3) 2 lecture and 2 lab hours per week.  P: HLTH 3810, 3820. Organization and administration of sports medicine programs including law, ethics, and therapeutic concepts. Advanced experience in prevention, clinical evaluation, treatment, and rehabilitation of sports‑associated afflictions.

4323. Methods of Teaching Health Education (3) (F) Theory and application of the content and methodologies to be utilized in the secondary school health program.

4324. Internship in Health Education (10) (S) Full-time, semester-long internship. P: Admission to upper division; EDUC 3200; HLTH 2123; completion of HLTH 4323 with a minimum grade of C; PSYC 1000; C: HLTH 4326. Observation and supervised teaching in an assigned health education public school classroom.

4326. Internship Seminar: Issues in Health Education (1) P: Admission to upper division; C: HLTH 4324. Individualized study of problems or issues pertinent in school health education.

4348. Health Education Problems (3) May receive credit for only one of HLTH 3020, 4348. Study of current health problems in the US with a focus on the nature of the problems including sociological conditions and cultural and governmental factors which contribute to their causes and solutions.

4500, 4501, 4502. Independent Study (1,2,3) (F) (S) P: Consent of instructor. Individualized program developed through student initiative in consultation with the designated instructor as an Extension of formal course offerings.

4600. Data Analysis for Health Promotion Programming (3) (S) C: HLTH 4700. Develops an understanding of and skills in utilizing health-related data for planning worksite health promotion and cost-control programs.

4604. Applied Principles of Health Promotion (3) (F) (S) P: BIOL 2130, 2131; NUHM 2105; PSYC 1000; or consent of instructor. Indepth study of the health content areas most commonly addressed in health promotion programs. Emphasis is on the integration of current knowledge in the context of contemporary educational strategies.

4605. Community Strategies for Health Education (3) (F) (S) (SS) P: HLTH 3000 or consent of instructor. Development of skills in community interventions for health educators based on principles of community organization. Both classroom instruction and field exposure will be utilized. Additionally, case studies and real life experiences will be used to the greatest extent possible.

4611. Planning and Evaluation of Community Health Education Programs (3) (F) (S) (SS) P: HLTH 3000, 4620, 4621. Study of planning theory and application for health education programs, including evaluation methodology. Applications for epidemiological and sociological diagnoses in program development.

4620. Group Strategies for Community Health Education (3) (S) P: HLTH 3000; C: HLTH 4621 or consent of instructor. Study of group dynamics, effective communication and decision‑making by groups in a variety of community and health settings. Emphasis is on strategies for facilitating the effectiveness of group interaction, on identification of training needs, and on steps in planning, implementing, and evaluating group educational experiences such as workshops, conferences, short courses, and community meetings. Appropriate for any student preparing for a career in the health professions.

4621. Group Strategies Laboratory (0) (S) 2 lab hours per week. C: HLTH 4620. Health education lab to design and deliver health education materials and educational activities.

4700. Practicum Seminar in Worksite Health Education (3) (S) P: HLTH 4200. Survey of private sector health promotion programs. Based on the needs and operations of local sites, student will be assigned individual projects.

4860. Sports Medicine Practicum II (3) (S) 1 lecture and 15 supervised clinical hours per week. P: HLTH 3860. Practical experience in athletics under the supervision of a certified athletic trainer. Current CPR and first-aid certifications and proof of medical malpractice insurance are required for the duration of this practicum.

4991. Health Education and Promotion Internship (12) (F) (S) (SS) P: Completion of all other requirements for the major. Professionally supervised learning experience.

5002. Maternal and Child Health Education (3) P: HLTH 3010 or consent of instructor. Provides the community health professional with the theoretical base and appropriate education strategies for delivery of community health education programs including basic population concepts and measures; epidemiological indicators of health and social status of women and children; analysis of prevailing social policies as they relate to maternal and child health; and federal policies affecting children and families.

5200. Health Education in the Workplace (3) (F) P: Undergraduates must have consent of instructor. Overview of health education‑promotion programs at the worksite with a focus on design, implementation, and evaluation. Using appropriate instruments, students will conduct on‑site health education needs assessment and develop a health education plan responsive to the identified needs and corporate operations of a particular industry.

5310. Education for Human Sexuality (3) (S) P: Health education major or consent of instructor. Study of human sexuality education including comprehensive knowledge and sex education methodology for effective communication with children and youth. Designed for school and community professionals working in school settings or consulting with schools.

5345. Alcoholism in Health Education (3) (F) Effects of alcohol on the human body with sociological, psychological, physiological, and economic implications as they apply to everyday living. Methods and procedures for alcohol education are presented with resource materials.

5900. Stress Management (3) P: Undergraduate course in anatomy and physiology; graduate standing or consent of instructor. Study of the positive and negative aspects of stress as it relates to performance and to health. Emphasis is placed upon sources of stress and the positive management of stress, including lifestyle and life skills.

HLTH Banked Courses

3250. School Health Services (2)
3261. Administration of School and Community Health Programs (3)
4290, 4291, 4292. Work Experience in Health Education and Promotion (1,2,3)
4325. First Aid and CPR Instructor (3)
4340. Methods and Content in Health Education (3)
4610. Individual Strategies for Community Health Education (3)
4989. Seminar in Community Health Education Practice (1)
4990. Internship in Worksite Health Promotion (12)
4992. Internship in Community Health Education (12)
5313. School Health Education (3)

HNRS: HONORS SEMINARS

All HNRS courses except the lab are writing intensive.

2011. Honors Seminar in the Humanities (3) (GE:HU) May be repeated for a maximum of 6 s.h. credit with change of topic. Specific topic will change each semester; examples might be "What it Means to be Human (according to Shakespeare),"  "Current Attempts to Resolve Classical Philosophical Problems," "Banning Books: Censorship in Modern America," and "Gay Literature: From Marginal to Mainstream."

2012. Honors Seminar in the Fine Arts (3) (GE:FA) May be repeated for a maximum of 6 s.h. credit with change of topic. Specific topic will change each semester; examples might be "The Arts in Society," "An Introduction to the Fine Arts," "Gothic Cathedrals: Their Meaning and Significance," and "Listening to Music Intelligently."

2013. Honors Seminar in the Social Sciences (3) (GE:SO) May be repeated for a maximum of 6 s.h. credit with change of topic. Specific topic will change each semester; examples might be "Sexual Abuse: Incidence, Impact, Prevention," "The Race for the Presidency," "The Civil Rights Revolution," "The American Way of War,"  "Church and State in the United States," and "New World Meets Old: The Colombian Exchange."

2014. Honors Seminar in the Sciences (3)  (GE:SC) May be repeated for a maximum of 6 s.h. credit with change of topic. Specific topic will change each semester; examples might be "Subjectivity in Science," "Scientific Experimentation and Social Acceptance," "Chemistry and the Environment," and "The Geology of the National Parks."

2015. Honors Science Laboratory (1) (GE:SC) Honors lab will accompany HNRS 2014 when considered appropriate by the science department offering the seminar.

Seminars 2006, 2116, 2216, 2316, and 2416 comprise interdisciplinary investigation which crosses over the lines of the areas. Examples might be "The Grotesque in Art and Literature," "Poets and Painters," "The Sixties: Be There Now," and "The History and Philosophy of Technology."

2006. Interdisciplinary Honors Seminar (No general education credit) (3)

2116. Interdisciplinary Honors Seminar (3) (GE:HU)

2216. Interdisciplinary Honors Seminar (3) (GE:FA)

2316. Interdisciplinary Honors Seminar (3) (GE:SO)

2416. Interdisciplinary Honors Seminar (3) (GE:SC)

3101, 3102, 3103.  Independent Study (1,2,3) (F) (S) (SS)  May be repeated in combination with other HNRS Independent Studies for a maximum of six s.h. credit.  P: Consent of program director.  Independent research/creative activity project, supervised by a faculty mentor.

4101, 4102, 4103.  Independent Study (1,2,3) (F) (S) (SS) May be repeated in combination with other HNRS Independent Studies for a maximum of six s.h. credit.  P: Consent of program director.  Independent research/creative activity project, supervised by a faculty mentor.

HPRO: HEALTH PROFESSIONS

2000. Survey of the Allied Health Professions (2) May receive credit for only one of HPRO 2000, REHB 2000. Overview of the major allied health professions including a description of the profession, educational requirements, employment opportunities, and role of each profession in an integrated system of health care. Particular emphasis will be given to those professions represented by educational programs at East Carolina University.

2100. Perspectives in Health Care (2) Recommended for freshmen and sophomores interested in becoming health professionals. General health terminology, professional ethics, inter‑ and intra‑professional relationships and the concept of total health care.

4300. Community Health and Organization (2) Health and health care systems at local, state, and national levels with emphasis upon socio‑medical problems and the role of health professionals in the delivery of community health care.

4305. Administration, Supervision, and Consultation for the Health Professions (3) Concepts and principles involved in administration, supervision, and consultation within health care settings.

4350. Research Design (2) (WI) P: MATH 2228 or equivalent. Introduction to research to help the student to gain skill as a critic of research literature and to achieve beginning competence in the research process.

5000. Seminar in Human Sexual Dysfunctions (3) Exploration of problems in human sexual behavior and functioning, emphasizing the development of assessment and intervention skills in the delivery of sexual health care to a broad spectrum of clients to whom health and social professionals relate.

5011, 5012. Gross Anatomy (5,0) P: Enrolled in OCCT or PTHE programs or consent of department chair. Structure of the human body with lab dissection.

5030, 5031. Neuroanatomy (3,0) P: HPRO 5011, 5012; enrolled in OCCT or PTHE programs or consent of department chair. Structure and function of the human nervous system. Special Attention is given to the relationship between the structure and function of the nervous system and the foundations of neurology. The pathophysiology of specific neurologic disorders common to the practice of occupational and physical therapy will be discussed.

IDIS: INDUSTRIAL DISTRIBUTION

3770. The Electrical Distributor: Purpose and Functions (3) (F) P: Technology major or minor. Indepth investigation into the functioning and services of electrical distributors and electrical product manufacturer personnel, and their agents, consumers, purchasing managers, and buyers.

3780. Industrial Warehousing (3) (S) Study of warehousing operations and the management, logistics, control, productivity, and analytical tools and techniques used to analyze and solve problems related to warehouse profitability.

INTL: INTERNATIONAL STUDIES

1000. Introduction to International Studies (3) (F) (SS) (GE:SO) Surveys from a global perspective the major social, economic, geographical, political, and cultural issues affecting men and women. Serves as an introduction to the various areas of concentration within the international studies minor.

2003. Introduction to Chinese Culture (3) (GE:HU) P: ENGL 1200. Cultural survey of Chinese society and Chinese people.

2004. Introduction to Japanese Culture (3)  Survey of the evolution of Japanese culture, with emphasis on the changing social‑cultural values of the Japanese as a people.

2100, 2101. Arts and Sciences Abroad: Humanities (3,6) (GE:HU) 2100: a minimum of 4 weeks abroad during summer, 3 s.h.; 42 classroom hours (including field trips). 2101: a minimum of thirteen weeks abroad during spring and/or fall, 6 s.h.; 84 classroom hours (including field trips). May count toward general education humanities requirement. On‑site exploration of a particular culture and its literary and/or philosophical contributions.

2200, 2201. Arts and Sciences Abroad: Arts (3,6) (GE:FA) 2200: a minimum of 4 weeks abroad during summer, 3 s.h.; 42 classroom hours (including field trips). 2201: a minimum of thirteen weeks abroad during spring and/or fall, 6 s.h.; 84 classroom hours (including field trips). May count toward general education fine arts requirement. On‑site exploration of the fine arts produced by a particular foreign culture.

2300, 2301. Arts and Sciences Abroad: Science (3,6) (GE:SC) 2300: a minimum of 4 weeks abroad during summer, 3 s.h.; 42 classroom hours (including field trips). 2301: a minimum of thirteen weeks abroad during spring and/or fall, 6 s.h.; 84 classroom hours (including field trips). On‑site scientific field studies abroad. Specific topics in biology, chemistry, geology, physics, and/or science education.

2400, 2401. Arts and Sciences Abroad: Social Sciences (3,6) (SS) (GE:SO) 2400: a minimum of 4 weeks abroad during summer,  3 s.h.; 42 classroom hours (including field trips). 2401: a minimum of thirteen weeks abroad during spring and/or fall, 6 s.h.; 84 classroom hours (including field trips). On‑site exploration of the history, geography, political science, psychology, sociology, anthropology, and/or economics of a particular region abroad.

3010. Field Study in Latin America (6) P: Consent of instructor. Field work in Latin America under the supervision of an East Carolina University faculty member approved by the Latin-American Studies Committee.

3852. Cultural Environment of International Business (3) Same as MKTG 3852. P: Junior standing and 3 s.h. in ECON. Analysis of cross-cultural differences in international relations and business management and the study of strategies/tactics to overcome cultural barriers to international trade, investment, and human relationships.

5000. Senior Seminar in International Studies (3) (S) P: Consent of Instructor. Survey and analysis of diverse contemporary international issues. Topics may include ethical/normative perspectives in the world community; demographic trends–population, food, and health; energy policies; environmental hazards–climate and pollution; economic development; selected regional conflicts; and initiatives in transnational cooperation. Specific topics to be determined by instructor.

INTL Banked Courses

2000, 2001. Chinese Language I, II (3,3)

ITAL: ITALIAN

1001. Italian Level I (3) (F00) Lab work required. May not be counted toward foreign language requirement. First of a two‑course sequence. Intensive training in the basic skills of understanding, speaking, reading, and writing Italian, with focus on the life and culture of Italy.

1002. Italian Level II (3) (S01) Lab work required. May not be counted toward foreign language requirement. P: ITAL 1001. Second of a two‑course sequence. Further intensive training in the basic skills of understanding, speaking, reading, and writing Italian with focus on the life and culture of Italy.

1003. Intermediate Italian I (3) (F01) P: ITAL 1002 or equivalent. Laboratory work required. Emphasis on improving reading ability in Italian and acquainting students with Italian civilization and its most important writers.

1004. Intermediate Italian II (3) (S02) P: ITAL 1003 or equivalent. Laboratory work required. Emphasis on improving reading ability in Italian and acquainting students with Italian civilization and its most important writers.

2220. Italian Literature in Translation (3) (S) May count toward the general education humanities requirement. Selected works of Italian literature. May not be used to satisfy a language requirement.

ITAL Banked Courses

1040. Conversational Italian Practiced in Italy (3)
1050. Introduction to Italian Lyric Literature (3) 

ITEC: INDUSTRIAL TECHNOLOGY

2000. Industrial Technology Applications of Computer Systems (3) (F) (S) (SS) Technical and managerial aspects of computer applications and information technology in industry and engineering areas.

2010. Introduction to Industry and Technology (3) (F) (S) (SS) Introductory study of industry and technology, which provides a foundation for advanced study in the various technology specialization areas. Emphasis is on the basic technical and technical managerial concepts of manufacturing, construction, and service industries with some Attention to the evolution of industry and career opportunities in broad fields of industry and industrial education.

2020. Materials Technology (3) (WI*) (F) (S) (SS) Broad technical study of the physical characteristics, mechanical properties, and applications of the materials of modern industry, including metallic, fibrous, polymeric, ceramic, and composite materials.

2090. Energy Processing and Transactional Power Systems (3) (F) (S) (SS) Technical investigation into energy converters and transactional power systems including mechanical, combustion, electrical, and fluid power converters.

3100. Internship in Industrial Technology (3) (F) (S) (SS) Minimum of 240 hours of supervised work experience. P: Consent of instructor and at least one semester as a full‑time ECU student. Internship of students first experiencing the technical and managerial problems of industry, requiring a minimum of 240 hours of approved full- or part‑time industrial or technical employment, in addition to participation in a weekly seminar or completion of 8 concept papers.

3290. Technical Writing (3) (WI) (F) (S) (SS) P: ENGL 1200. Practice in writing about technical problems of significance to the student.

4100. Internship in Industrial Technology (3) (F) (S) (SS) Minimum of 240 hours of supervised work experience. May be taken concurrently with ITEC 3100. P: ITEC 3100 or consent of instructor. Supervised internship for students with industrial or technical experience, requiring a minimum of 240 hours of full- or part‑time work in addition to participation in a weekly seminar. For students not within commuting distance of ECU, participation in the seminar may be waived in lieu of concept papers.

4293. Industrial Supervision (3) (WI) (F) (S) P: Senior standing and completion of 20 s.h. of industrial technology courses. Covers the fundamental and special techniques for supervising people in the industrial or business work situation. Duties and responsibilities of the supervisor and stresses successful supervisory practices.

4300. Quality Assurance Concepts (3) (F) (S) (SS) P: 18 s.h. of technology core courses. Study of the managerial, statistical, motivational, and technological aspects of quality control as practiced in manufacturing, construction, processing, and service industries.

5100. Internship in Industrial Technology (3) (F) (S) P: Consent of program director. Supervised internship with an industrial or technical firm. Requires journal of related activities and a final report.

5290. Technical Presentations for Industry (3) (F) (S) P: ITEC 3290, 3291. Investigation and utilization of the tools, techniques, and technical systems for transmitting information related to the problems and issues of contemporary industry.

ITEC Banked Courses

2001. Industrial Technology Applications of Computer Systems (0)
2080, 2081. Power Technology (3,0)
3030, 3091. Supervised Work Experience (2)
3291. Technical Writing Laboratory (0)
3294. Principles of Industrial Training (3)
4290. Job Analysis: Procedures and Applications (3)

JAPN: JAPANESE

1001. Japanese Level I (3) (F)  Lab work required. First of a four-course sequence. Intensive training in the basic skills of understanding and speaking Japanese.

1002. Japanese Level II (3) (S)  Lab work required. P: JAPN 1001 or placement in 1002 by Japanese placement test. Second level of a beginning course. Further intensive training in the basic skills of understanding and speaking Japanese. Introduction to reading and writing Japanese.

1003. Japanese Level III (3) (F) Lab work required. P: JAPN 1002 or placement in 1003 by Japanese placement test. Third level of a beginning course. Further intensive training leading to more advanced achievement in understanding, speaking, reading, and writing Japanese.

1004. Japanese Level IV (3) (S)  Lab work required. P: JAPN 1003 or placement in 1004 by Japanese placement test. Intermediate-level course. Further intensive training leading to more advanced achievement in understanding, speaking, reading, and writing Japanese.


ECU Undergraduate Catalog 2000-2001