ECU Undergraduate Catalog 2000-2001

 

JUST: CRIMINAL JUSTICE

All JUST courses numbered above 2999 are criminal justice/social work major-only courses.

1000. The Criminal Justice System (3) (F) (S) (SS) Overview and discussion of the roles, problem areas, and suggested program changes for police and law enforcement, detention services, courts, community correctional services, and correctional institutions.

2000. The Criminal Offender (3) (F) (S) (SS) Examination of the legal, sociological, psychological, medical, and constitutional approaches to the understanding of criminal behavior.

3003. Addiction, Crime, and the Criminal (3) P: JUST 3500. Study of crime relationship to alcohol and drug addiction and abuse.

3007. Criminal Investigation (3) (F) P: JUST 3500. Fundamentals of criminal investigation including the various types of physical evidence, collection and preservation of evidence, preliminary procedures, crime scene searches, major crime investigations, and court appearances.

3008. Correctional Systems (3) (S) P: JUST 3500. Examines federal, state, and local correctional operations. Topics include the role and purpose of correctional facilities, historical and philosophical development, management and organizational principles, custody and security operations, treatment and classification issues, custody levels of various correctional facilities for men and women, and the role of correctional personnel.

3012. Police Operations (3) (S) P: JUST 3500. Examines the role and operation of law enforcement organizations in the United States. Includes accountability, legal issues, and community relationships.

3100. Interviewing and Crisis Management (3) (F) (S) P: JUST 1000, 2000. Provides introduction to interviewing and crisis intervention techniques. Examines interactions with persons other than offenders, including victims, witnesses, children and families of those involved in criminal activity, and individuals in crisis situations. Analyzes techniques for management of crises encountered by criminal justice personnel. Focuses on development of effective communication skills, mediation of conflict, and methods of defusing violence.

3500. Principles of Criminal Law (3) (F) (S) P: JUST 1000, 2000. Nature, sources, and types of criminal law; the examination in detail of selected specific criminal offenses; and criminal liability and defenses and basic legal research.

3501. Criminal Procedure (3) (WI) (F) (S) P: JUST 3500. Rules and procedures that govern the criminal justice process from arrest through search, interrogation, indictment, arraignment, and trial until final sentence; review and rights given to prisoners; and basic concepts from the Constitution on which the due process rights of individuals are based.

3502. Correctional Law (3) (WI) (F) (S) P: JUST 3500. Examines the legal issues of confining prisoners and operating a correctional facility. Prisoners' rights, constitutional issues, and the legal role and responsibilities of jails, prisons, and community correctional personnel. Role of the courts in correctional matters. Traces the development of correctional law in the US.

3700. Public Safety in a Multicultural Environment (3) (F) (S) P: JUST 3500. Focus on issues related to providing public safety services in communities in which cultural, ethnic, racial, philosophical, and moral diversity exists. Also addresses discrimination within the system, including hiring, promotion, and assignment policies.

3800. Research Methods in Criminal Justice (3) (F) (S) P: JUST 3500. Examination and discussion of research design, conceptualization, hypothesis formulation, measurement, sampling techniques, data management, and research writing as they relate to the field of criminal justice.

4004. Criminal Justice History (3) (S) P: JUST 3500. Examines the development of major aspects of criminal justice from pre-historic time to the present day. Students will be exposed to past practices in American criminal justice as well as other societies.

4005. Organized Crime (3) (SS) P: JUST 3500. Examines the type of individuals and organizations involved in organized crime, the type of activities conducted, historical and socio-political forces which facilitate organized criminal behavior, structural aspects of organized crime, and official responses to this phenomenon.

4006. Community Corrections (3) (F) or (SS) P: JUST 3800. Designed to teach the student how to apply intervention methods within particular community service‑delivery constructs.

4200. The Juvenile Justice System (3) (F) (S) P: JUST 3800. Examines conditions under which delinquency occurs and explores strategies and treatment interventions which have been identified as most effective in dealing with delinquent behaviors. Explores the role of the juvenile court in the prevention and control of delinquency. Special emphasis given to the changing role of the court and implications for professional practice.

4300. Criminal Justice Administration (3) (F) (S) P: JUST 3500. Provides an understanding of the basic concepts of organization and management as applied to criminal justice organizations, including management principles, supervision, and leadership.

4401, 4402, 4403. Independent Study (1,2,3) (F) (S) (SS) May be repeated for a maximum of 3 s.h. credit. P: JUST 3500. Selected readings, research, or studies related to criminal justice. Faculty conferences to be arranged by student-faculty contracts for program approved by director of the criminal justice program.

4500. Issues and Problems in Criminal Justice (3) (F) (S) Should be taken during last semester in criminal justice program. P: JUST 3501 or 3502; senior standing. Examination and discussion of values, ethics, and major issues of concern to the American criminal justice system.

4600. Special Topics in Criminal Justice (3) (F) or (S) or (SS) May be repeated for credit with change of topic. P: JUST 3500. Study of specialized topics and current developments in criminal justice.

4990. Field Education and Seminar (9) (F) (S) 2 seminar hours per week; 4 days directed field education per week. Application for admission to this course must be received 2 semesters in advance of placement. P: Minimum cumulative 2.5 GPA to be eligible for consideration; completion of all required JUST and supportive area courses; selection based upon availability of appropriate placements and criteria specified in Criminal Justice Student Handbook. Supervised field education opportunity in approved agencies offered during the final semester of the criminal justice program.

JUST Banked Courses

3000. Residential Institutions (3)
3006. Security Systems (3)
3009. Corrections Case Management (3)
4001. Police Organization and Administration (3)
4002. Correctional Administration (3)
5000. Comparative Criminal Justice (3)

LATN: LATIN

The following courses will satisfy the general education humanities requirement: LATN 2021, 2022, 3021, 3022.

1001. Latin Level I (3) (F) First of a 2-semester course sequence. Training in the principles of Latin grammar with an emphasis on reading skills. Correct pronunciation taught, but no other oral skills required. All communication in English.

1002. Latin Level II (3) (S)  P: LATN 1001; placement by examination; or consent of instructor. Second of a two-course sequence. Completion of basic skills of Latin grammar. Elementary readings introduced, adjusted to the level of the student.

1003. Latin Level III (3) (F)  P: LATN 1002; placement by examination; or consent of instructor. Intensive review and application of basic skills of grammar acquired in LATN 1001-1002. Development of reading skills through selected works of a major author such as Cicero or Caesar.

1004. Latin Level IV (3) (S)  P: LATN 1003; placement by examination; or consent of instructor. Continued development of reading skills and introduction to critical approaches to literature. Readings in the poetry of a major author such as Vergil, Catullus, or Ovid.

2021. Age of Cicero (3)  P: LATN 1004 or consent of instructor. Readings in Latin literature from Cicero, Caesar, Catullus, Lucretius, Varro, and Sallust. A coherent literary and historical portrait of the last fifty years of the Roman republic.

2022. Age of Augustus (3)  P: LATN 2021 or consent of instructor. Readings in Latin literature to be taken from Horace's Odes, Vergil's Ecologues and Georgics, Propertius' Elegies, Augustus' Res Gestae, and the works of Ovid and Tibullus. A coherent literary and historical portrait of the early empire in Rome.

3021. Silver Age Latin Literature (3)  P: LATN 2022 or consent of instructor. Advanced course with readings to be taken from Seneca's prose, Lucan, Petronius, Tacitus, Pliny the Younger, and Apuleius.

3022. Roman Drama (3)  P: LATN 3021 or consent of instructor. Advanced course with readings to be taken from Plautus, Terence, and Senecan tragedy.

4521, 4522, 4523. Directed Readings in Latin (1,2,3) May be repeated. P: Consent of instructor. Indepth exploration of a selected aspect of Roman culture (literature, civilization, etc.).

LDVP: LEADERSHIP DEVELOPMENT

3401, 3402, 3403. Seminar in Leadership Development (1,2,3) (S) P: Nomination by student's dean/chairperson. Series of seminars designed to acquaint students with a variety of leadership experiences and patterns. Each seminar led by a thought leader from a different area of society.

LIBS: LIBRARY STUDIES

1000. Research Skills for Electronic and Print Resources (1) (F) (S) (SS) Introduction to university electronic and print information sources.

3102. Research Sources and Techniques (3) How to select and research topics in all areas through reference and nonreference materials. Designed to meet the student's academic interests and needs in general and major areas.

3200. The Art of Storytelling (3) (S) Selecting, adapting, evaluating, and using the art of storytelling in professions such as human services, business, education, recreation, health care, and entertainment. Emphasis on storytelling performance for audiences of all ages.

4950. Literature for Children (3) (WI) (S) Same as ENGL 4950. May not count toward general education literature requirement or as advanced elective for ENGL majors. Survey of literature for children from early childhood through junior high school.

LIBS Banked Courses

2123. Early Experiences for the Prospective Teacher (1)
4323. School Media Specialist in Grades K-12 (3)
4324. Observation and Supervised Participation as a School Media Specialist (8)
5114. Materials for Children (2)
5115. Materials for Young Adults (2)

MANF: MANUFACTURING

2076, 2077. Non‑Polymeric Materials (3,0) (F) (S) 2 lecture and 4 lab hours per week. P: ITEC 2000, 2001, 2020; DESN 2034, 2035. Studying the shaping, forming, and utilization of non‑polymeric materials such as metals, ceramics, and combinations that are used in the various manufacturing processes in industry. A practical approach, having the students plan and conceive products, will be emphasized.

3020. Manufacturing Processes (3) (WI*) (F) (S) (SS) P: ITEC 2090; MANF 2076, 2077. Broad survey course of the common manufacturing processes used to produce industrial products. Includes an overview of the latest manufacturing processes techniques.

3500. Automation Systems (3)  (F) 2 lecture and 2 lab hours per week. P: ELEC 2054; MANF 3020. Study of the basic types of automated systems commonly used in industry, including control systems and common types of computer applications in the design, development, and management of automated manufacturing systems.

3800. Capital Equipment (3) (S) P: ACCT 2401; ITEC 3292. Analysis of competitive equipment offerings, make‑versus‑buy opportunities and repair‑versus‑replacement costs associated with manufacturing and construction equipment decisions.

4020, 4021. Process System Design (3,0) (F) 2 lecture and 2 lab hours per week. P: ITEC 3292, 4300; MANF 3300, 3500; 3 s.h. management/human relations elective; consent of instructor. Study, planning, and selection of processes for manufacturing various products. Emphasis is placed on selection criteria such as safety, material, jigs, fixtures, layout, and overall efficiency.

4023. Process System Application (3) (F) (S) 6 lab hours per week. P: MANF 4020, 4021; consent of instructor. Planning and layout of a processing system for manufacturing of a line product. Emphasis is placed on process design, costing, control systems, and setup.

4200. Work Methods Analysis (3) (S) P: MANF 3300. Analysis of work methods and a study of work measurement systems. Includes the principles of motion study, work simplification, and work measurement by direct and predetermined motion‑time systems.

4502. Laboratory Problems: Production (3) (F) (S) 6 lab hours per week. P: MANF 3020. Independent study of industrial manufacturing systems, processes, and concepts.

4507. Laboratory Problems: Metals (3) 6 lab hours per week. P: MANF 2076, 2077. Indepth and independent study of concepts and/or processes of the metals area, its tools, and materials, with a strong emphasis on lab work.

5504. Independent Study: Manufacturing (3) May be repeated for credit with consent of department chair. P: Consent of instructor. Research‑oriented course in problem solving with the tools, materials, and processes of the manufacturing industries.

MANF Banked Courses

2066, 2067. Polymeric Materials (3,0)
2072, 2073. Metals Technology I (3,0)
3072. Metals Technology (3)
3300. Plant Layout and Materials Handling (3) (S)
4060, 4061. Woods Products Manufacturing (3,0)
4092, 4093. Manufacturing (3,0)
4094, 4095. Industrial Maintenance (3,0)
4501. Laboratory Problems: Maintenance (3)
5060. Organic Matrix Composite Materials (3)
5090, 5091. Fluid Power Circuits (3,0)

MATH: MATHEMATICS

0001. Intermediate Algebra-A (2) (F) (S) (SS) May not be taken by students who have credit for any of the following courses: MATH 0045, 1065, 1074, 1075, 1085, 2119, 2171, or who have passed the mathematics placement test. May not count toward general education mathematics requirement, certification, or degree requirements. Remedial course in basic algebra; some sections may be taught in a lab/tutorial mode.

0045. Intermediate Algebra-B (2) (F) (S)  May not be taken by students who have credit for any of the following courses: MATH 0001, 1065, 1074, 1075, 1085, 2119, 2171, or who have passed the mathematics placement test. May not count toward general education mathematics requirement, certification, or degree requirements. Remedial course in basic algebra; some sections may be taught in a lab/tutorial mode.

1065. College Algebra (3) (F) (S) (SS) (GE:MA) May not be taken by students who have credit for MATH 1085. P: Appropriate score on mathematics  placement test. Covers the usual topics: sets; linear, quadratic, polynomial, and exponential functions; inequalities; permutations; combinations; the binomial theorem; and mathematical induction.

1066. Applied Mathematics for Decision Making (3) (F) (S) (SS) (GE:MA) Required for students planning to major in business administration or accounting. P: Appropriate score on the mathematics placement test or approval of the department chair. Develops skills in formulating models for and interpreting solutions to business word problems. Topics covered: linear equations, nonlinear equations, systems of linear equations, applications of matrix algebra, and applied basic differential calculus. (No proofs will be included.) 

1067. Algebraic Concepts and Relationships (3) (F) (S) (SS)  (GE:MA) May not count toward MATH or CSCI major or minor. P: Appropriate score on mathematics placement test. Study of the properties of the integers, rationals, real and complex numbers and polynomials from an algebraic point of view; conjectures and intuitive proofs in number theory; the properties of linear and quadratic functions. Representations of real-world relationships with physical models, charts, graphs, equations and inequalities. Emphasis on the development of problem-solving strategies and abilities.

1074. Applied Trigonometry (2) (F) (S) (SS) Students planning to take MATH 2171  must elect 1085. May not be taken by students who have credit for  MATH 1075 or 1085. P: MATH 1065. Study of trigonometry emphasizing the practical and computational aspects of the subject. The properties of the trigonometric functions: use of tables, interpolation, logarithms, solution of right and oblique triangles, and applications.

1075. Plane Trigonometry (3) May not be taken by students who have successfully completed MATH 1074 or 1085. P: MATH 1065. Includes the topics usually covered in a plane trigonometry course with trigonometric functions and related concepts, trigonometric identities and their applications, graphs of trigonometric functions, graphs of inverse trigonometric relations and functions, trigonometric equations, and vectors.

1077. Pre-Calculus Concepts and Relationships (3) (S) May not count toward MATH or CSCI major or minor. P: MATH 1067. Modeling approach to the study of functions (including logarithmic, exponential, and trigonometric functions), data analysis and matrices; lays a foundation for future course work in calculus, finite mathematics, discrete mathematics, and statistics.

1085. Pre‑Calculus Mathematics (5) (F) (S) (SS) (GE:MA) May not be taken by students who have credit for MATH 1074 or 1075. P: MATH 1065 with a minimum grade of C. One‑semester course in algebra and trigonometry for qualified students who plan to take calculus.

 2119. Elements of Calculus (3) (F) (S) (SS)  (GE:MA) May not receive credit for MATH 2119 after having received credit for a higher numbered calculus course. P: MATH 1065 with a minimum grade of C. Elementary differentiation and integration techniques. Proofs are not emphasized.

2121. Calculus for the Life Sciences I (3) (F) (S) (SS) (GE:MA) May receive credit for only one of MATH 2121, 2119. May not receive credit for MATH 2121 after taking MATH 2171. P: MATH 1065 or 1077 with a minimum grade of C. Introductory differential calculus with applications for students in the biological sciences. Introduction to and differentiation of the exponential, logarithmic, and trigonometric functions; with applications to exponential and periodic phenomena, related rates, regions of increase, and extrema.

2122. Calculus for the Life Sciences II (3) (F) (S) (SS) Continuation of MATH 2121. May not receive credit for MATH 2122 after taking MATH 2172. P: MATH 2121. Introductory integral calculus with applications for students in the biological sciences. Introduction to and applications of definite integrals. Probability density functions. Functions of several variables, partial derivatives, simple differential equation and difference equation models, and the arithmetic of matrices and vectors.

2123. Early Experiences for the Prospective Teacher (1) (F) (S) P: MATH 2171. Minimum of 16 hours of directed observations and planned participation in appropriate school environments and 8 hours of seminar class instruction in the teaching area. May not count toward BA in MATH major or minor. Introduction to the teaching of mathematics designed for prospective teachers.

2124. Elementary Mathematical Models (1) (F)  P: MATH 2171. Formulation and solution of various types of problems using the techniques of establishing a mathematical model.

2127. Basic Concepts of Mathematics (3) (F) (S) (SS) (GE:MA) May not count toward MATH or CSCI major or minor. P: Appropriate score on mathematics placement test. System of real numbers and subsystems and their properties from an algebraic viewpoint. Statistics and number theory are also introduced.

2129. Basic Concepts of Mathematics (2) (F) (S) (SS)  May not count toward MATH or CSCI major or minor. P: MATH 2127. Second course in a sequence for elementary education majors. Methods and language of geometry and the relationship of geometry to the real world.

2171, 2172, 2173. Calculus I, II, III (4,4,4) (F) (S) (SS)  (GE:MA) P for 2171: MATH 1085 or 2122 with a minimum grade of C; P for 2172: MATH 2122 with a minimum grade of C or MATH 2171; P for 2173: MATH 2172. Integrated sequence of courses in the geometry of the plane and space and in the fundamentals of calculus. Topics include curves in the Cartesian plane, properties of functions, limits and continuity, differentiation and integration of algebraic and transcendental functions and their applications, conics, polar and parametric equations, the rudiments of solid analytic geometry, partial differentiation, multiple integration, infinite series, and expansion of functions.

2228. Elementary Statistical Methods I (3) (F) (S) (SS) May not count toward MATH major or minor.  May receive credit for only one of MATH 2228, 2283. P: MATH 1065 or equivalent. Collection, systematic organization, analysis and interpretation of numerical data obtained in measuring certain traits of a given population. Designed for students with limited mathematical training.

2282. Data Analysis and Probability (3) (F) (S) (SS)  May not count toward MATH or CSCI major or minor.  May receive credit for only one of MATH 2282, 2935. P: MATH 1067. Collection of data from experiments and surveys. Organizing and representing data. Interpreting data for the purpose of judging claims, making decisions, or making predictions.

2283. Statistics for Business (3) (F) (S) (SS)  May receive credit for only one of MATH 2228, 2283. P: MATH 1065 or 1066 or equivalent. Sampling and probability distributions, measures of central tendency and dispersion, hypothesis testing, Chi‑square, and regression.

2427. Discrete Mathematical Structures (3) (F) (S) May not count toward MATH major or minor. May receive credit for only one of MATH 2427, 2775, 3237. P: MATH 1065 or 1066. Study of discrete mathematical structures. Special emphasis is given to those structures most important in computer science. Practical applications of the subject are considered.

2775. Topics in Discrete Mathematics (3) (F) May receive credit for only one of MATH 2427, 2775, 3237. P: MATH 1085. Study of selected topics in discrete mathematics appropriate for prospective teachers of secondary school mathematics. Some of the topics include: counting techniques, graph theory, difference equations, recursion, iteration, induction, and dynamical systems.

2935. Data Analysis (3) (S) May receive credit for only one of MATH 2282, 2935. P: MATH 1085. Introductory data analysis course utilizing a hands-on approach to the collection, representation, and interpretation of data. Some of the topics include types of data, sampling techniques, experimental probability, sampling distributions, simulations, and hypothesis testing using collected data.

3004. Seminar in Secondary Mathematics Curriculum–Algebra (1) (S) May not count toward BA in MATH or minor. 10 practicum hours per semester. P: MATH 2123. Study of the teaching and learning of introductory high school algebra.

3005. Seminar in Secondary Mathematics Curriculum–Geometry (1) (F) May not count toward BA in MATH or minor. 10 practicum hours per semester. P: MATH 2123; C: MATH 3233. Study of the teaching and learning of high school geometry.

3006. Seminar in Secondary Mathematics Curriculum–Advanced Mathematics (1) (S)  May not count toward BA in MATH or minor. 10 practicum hours per semester. P: MATH 3004, 3005. Study of the teaching and learning of advanced high school mathematics.

3166. Euclidean Geometry (3) (F) (S) (SS) May not count toward MATH or CSCI major or minor. P: MATH 1065 or 1067; 2127. Study of Euclidean geometry using deductive and inductive mathematical reasoning. Formal proofs are required.

3174. Vector Calculus (3) (S) P: MATH 2173. Review of vector algebra and vector functions of a single variable. Scalar and vector fields, line and surface integrals, and multiple integrals will be covered.

3218. Teaching Mathematics in Special Education (3) (F) (S) (SS) 4 lecture/lab hours per week. Lab and practicum experiences required. May not count toward MATH major or minor. P: Admission to upper division; MATH 1065, 2127; SPED 2000; at least one of the following: SPED 2102, 2103, 2104; RP: MATH 2129. Methods, materials, and techniques of teaching mathematics to special education students.  

3223. Teaching Mathematics in the Elementary Grades K‑6 (3) (F) (S) (SS) 2 lecture and 2 lab hours per week. P: MATH 2129. Teaches preservice elementary teachers appropriate techniques and methods for teaching mathematics to students in grades K‑6. Lab work provides deeper understanding of mathematical concepts and experience with materials and methods appropriate for classroom work.

3229. Elementary Statistical Methods II (3) (F) (S)  May not count toward MATH major or minor. P: MATH 2228 or equivalent. Collection, systematic organization, analysis and interpretation of numerical data obtained in measuring certain traits of a given population. Designed for students with limited mathematical training.

3233. College Geometry (3) (F) P: MATH 2171. Modern college geometry is presented as an outgrowth and Extension of elementary plane geometry. Important theorems relative to the nine‑point circle, cross ratios, the geometry of circles, and solid geometry are emphasized. Euclidean transformations are also discussed.

3237. Discrete Mathematics (3) (F) May not count toward MATH or CSCI major or minor. May receive credit for only one of MATH 2427, 2775, 3237. P: MATH 2121. Introduction to logic and sets, mathematical induction, and matrices. Applications of discrete mathematics in probability, linear programming, dynamical systems, social choice, and graph theory.

3238. Applied Mathematics for Teachers (2) P: MATH 1065. Applications of mathematics to business, education, science, social science, and other fields will be included. The microcomputer may be used in studying applications. No previous knowledge of microcomputers is required.

3239. Applied Mathematics Via Modeling (3) (S) May not count toward MATH or CSCI major or minor. P: MATH 2122, 2282, 3166, 3237. Consideration of real world problems that can be modeled with algebra, geometry, calculus, and statistical, probabilistic, discrete, or other mathematical techniques appropriate for prospective teachers of middle school mathematics. Mathematical modeling processes will be examined through historical and contemporary modeling success stories. Power and limitations of mathematical modeling will be considered.

3256. Linear Algebra (3) (F) (S) (SS) P: MATH 2172. Study of vector spaces, linear maps, matrices, systems of equations, determinants, and eigen values.

3263. Introduction to Modern Algebra (3) (WI) (F) (S) (SS) P: MATH 3256. Presentation of the postulation viewpoint of modern algebra. Defining postulates for a mathematical system are exhibited from which the properties of the system are then derived. Principal systems studied are groups, rings, fields, each fully treated with illustrative examples.

3307. Mathematical Statistics I (3) (F) (S) (SS) P: MATH 2172. Axiomatic development of the theory of probability and application of the theory of probability to the construction of certain mathematical models.

3308. Mathematical Statistics II (3) (F) P: MATH 3307. Construction of mathematical models for various statistical distributions. Includes testing of hypotheses and estimation, small‑sample distributions, regression, and linear hypotheses.

3550, 3551. Mathematics Honors (2,1) (F) (S) (SS) P: MATH 2173 or consent of instructor. Open to students with exceptional mathematical ability who have completed MATH 2173. Acceptance in the program entitles the student to register for MATH 3550 or 3551.

3573. Introduction to Numerical Analysis (3) (S) Same as CSCI 3573. P: CSCI 2510 or 2600; MATH 2119 or 2172 or equivalent. Gives the student an understanding of algorithms, suitable for digital computation in the areas of linear algebra, linear programming, slope finding, area finding, and nonlinear equation solution.

3584. Computational Linear Algebra (3) (F) (S) (SS) May not count toward MATH major or minor. P: Calculus course. Introduction to the study of vectors, matrices, and determinants. Special emphasis is given to the application of linear algebra to the solution of practical problems.

4001. Technology in Secondary Mathematics Education (3) (F) May not count toward MATH major or minor. 2 lecture and 2 lab hours per week. P: Admission to upper division; MATH 2775, 2935; C: MATH 4323. Study of the uses and implications of calculators and computers in the secondary mathematics curriculum.

4201. Introduction to Stochastic Processes (3) (S) P: MATH 3307 or equivalent or consent of instructor. Introduction to the fundamental theory and models of stochastic processes. Topics include expectations and independence; sums of independent random variables; Markov chains, limiting behavior and applications of Markov chains; Poisson processes; birth and death processes; Gaussian processes.

4319. Teaching Mathematics in the Middle Grades (3) (F) 4 hours per week and 10-12 hours of field experience. May not count toward MATH or CSCI major or minor. P: Admission to upper division; EDUC 3200; MIDG 3010, 3022; MATH 2122, 2282, 3166, 3237; or consent of instructor; C: MIDG 4001, 4010; ENGL or HIST or MIDG or SCIE 4319; or consent of instructor. Study of techniques and methods of teaching mathematics in grades 6‑9.

4323. The Teaching of Mathematics in High School (3) (F)  4 hours per week. May not count toward BA in MATH or minor. P: MATH 2123. Modern methods and techniques used in teaching secondary school mathematics are carefully considered.

4324. Internship in Mathematics (10) (S)  Full-time, semester-long internship. May not count toward BA in MATH or minor. P: Admission to upper division; MATH 4323; C: MATH 4325; READ 3990. Observation and supervised teaching in mathematics in an assigned public secondary school classroom.

4325. Internship Seminar: Issues in Mathematics Education (1) (S)  May not count toward BA in MATH or minor. P: Admission to upper division; MATH 4323; C: MATH 4324. Individualized study of problems or issues related to mathematics education.

4331. Introduction to Ordinary Differential Equations (3) (F) (S) P: MATH 2173. Introduction to certain linear and non‑linear differential equations.

4332. The Calculus of Finite Differences (3) P: MATH 2173. Designed to study discrete changes that take place in the values of a function and its dependent variable due to discrete changes in the independent variable.

4501, 4502, 4503. Independent Study (1,2,3) (F) (S) (SS) Number of hours per week will depend on the credit hours and the nature of the work assigned. P: Mathematics major and consent of department chair. Designed to provide advanced mathematics students an opportunity to study topics supplementing the regular curriculum.

4550, 4551. Mathematics Honors (2,1) (F) (S) (SS) Open to students with exceptional mathematical ability who have completed MATH 2173. Acceptance in the program entitles the student to register for MATH 4550 or 4551. P: MATH 2173 or consent of instructor.

5000.  Introduction to Sampling Design (3) (F) P:MATH 3308 or 3229 or consent of instructor.  Fundamental principles of survey sampling, including data sources and types, questionnaire design, various sampling schemes, sampling and non-sampling errors and statistical analysis.

5002.  Logic for Mathematics and Computer Science (3) (S) Same as CSCI 5002. P: CSCI 3510 or MATH 2427 or 2775 or 3223 or 3256 or Phil 3580 or equivalent.  Introduction to methods of mathematical logic that have important applications in mathematics and computer science.  

5021. Theory of Numbers I (3) (S) P: MATH 3263 or consent of instructor. Topics in elementary theory of numbers such as properties of integers, residues, congruences, and certain fundamental theorems. Also, binary quadratic forms, algebraic numbers, and irrationality and transcendence of numbers are studied.

5031. Applied Statistical Analysis (3) (WI) May not count toward mathematics hours required for MA or MAEd in mathematics. P: MATH 2228, 2584; or equivalent; or consent of instructor.  Topics include analysis of variance and covariance, experimental design, multiple and partial regression and correlation, nonparametric statistics, and use of a computer statistical package.

5064. Introduction to Modern Algebra II (3) May not receive credit for MATH 5064 after taking MATH 6011. P: MATH 3263 or consent of instructor. Continuation of the development of topics begun in MATH 3263, including normal subgroups, factor groups, homomorphism, rings, ideals, quotient rings, and fields.

5101 (F), 5102 (S). Advanced Calculus I, II (3,3) P for 5101: MATH 2173 or consent of instructor; P for 5102: MATH 5101, 3256; or consent of instructor. Treats the basic properties of the real number system, point sets, theory of limits, ordinary and uniform continuity, the fundamental theorems of calculus, infinite series and regions of convergence, improper integrals.

5110. Elementary Complex Variables (3) (F) P: MATH 2173. Study of complex numbers, analytic functions, mapping by elementary functions, integrals, residues, and poles.

5121. Numerical Analysis in One Variable (3) P: MATH 2173; CSCI 2600 or equivalent knowledge of PASCAL or PL/1. Numerical analysis of problems with one independent variable, including solution of non‑linear equations in one unknown, interpolation and approximation of functions of one variable, numerical integration, and numerical differentiation and optimization.

5122. Numerical Analysis in Several Variables (3) P: MATH 3256, 4331; CSCI 2600 or equivalent knowledge of PASCAL or PL/1. Numerical analysis of problems with several independent variables, including numerical solution of ordinary differential equations, systems of linear equations, numerical linear algebra and matrix algebra, systems of nonlinear equations, and systems of ordinary differential equations.

5131. Deterministic Methods in Operations Research (3) P: MATH 2173; 3307 or 5801; CSCI 2600 or equivalent knowledge of PASCAL or PL/1. Introduction to deterministic techniques in operations research, including mathematical models; linear programming; the simplex method, with applications to optimization; the duality theorem; project planning and control problems; and elementary game theory.

5132. Probabilistic Methods in Operations Research (3) P: MATH 2173, 3256; 3307 or 5801; CSCI 2600 or an equivalent knowledge of PASCAL or PL/1. Introduction to probabilistic techniques in operations research, including an introduction to stochastic processes; queuing theory with applications to inventory theory and forecasting; Poisson and Markov processes; reliability simulation; decision analysis; integer programming; and non‑linear programming.

5251. Modern Mathematics for Elementary Teachers I (3) Not open to undergraduate or graduate majors or minors in mathematics. A teacher taking this course would receive certificate renewal credit and/or 3 s.h. of graduate elective credit in elementary education. May not count toward MATH or CSCI major or minor. P: MATH 3223 or equivalent or consent of instructor. Numeration systems and the real numbers from an axiomatic approach. Topics in geometry, algebra, probability theory, and number theory. Emphasis is upon the relationship between these topics and school mathematics.

5263, 5264. Modern Mathematics for Junior High School Teachers I, II (3,3) May not count toward MATH or CSCI  major or minor. P for 5263: Consent of instructor; P for 5264: MATH 5263 or consent of instructor. Introduction to set theory, mathematical systems and proofs, number systems, elementary number theory; applications of mathematics in business, science, and other areas; basic concepts of geometry, algebra, probability, and statistics.

5265, 5266. Microcomputers in Secondary Education (3,0) (F) 2 lecture and 2 lab hours per week. May not count toward MATH or CSCI major or minor. P: MATH 1075 or 1085 or 3166; consent of instructor. Introduction to the operation  and programming of microcomputers in the secondary school system.

5267, 5268. LOGO: A Computer Language for Educators (3,0) 2 lecture and 2 lab hours per week. May not count toward MATH major or minor. P: MATH 3166 or consent of instructor. Study of the language LOGO and its use with students K‑12.

5270. PASCAL Using the Microcomputer (3) May not count toward MATH or CSCI major or minor. May not be taken by students who have credit for CSCI 2610. P: MATH 1065 or equivalent. Study of the PASCAL language and problem solving using a microcomputer.

5311. Mathematical Physics I (3) Same as PHYS 5311. P: MATH 4331; PHYS 2360; or consent of instructor. Mathematical methods that are important in physics with emphasis on application. Includes integral transforms, integral equations, ordinary and partial differential equations, linear and nonlinear oscillations, orthonormal systems, Hilbert spaces, calculus of variations, and special functions.

5322. Foundations of Mathematics (3) (WI) (F) P: MATH 3233, 3263; or equivalent. Fundamental concepts and structural development of mathematics. Introduction to non‑Euclidean geometries, logic, Boolean Algebra, and set theory. Construction of the complex number systems. Transfinite cardinal numbers and a study of relations and functions. Throughout the course, the topics in mathematics are developed as postulational systems.

5521. Readings and Lectures in Mathematics (3) (F) (S) (SS)  Involves individual work with the student.

5551. The Historical Development of Mathematics (3) P: MATH 3233; C: MATH 2172 or consent of instructor. Introduces the history of mathematics from antiquity to the current time.  Emphasis on the study of significant problems which prompted the development of new mathematics.  Involves use of computer resources and the library for research of topics and solutions.

5581. Theory of Equations (3) P: MATH 2173 or consent of instructor. Operation with complex numbers, De Moivre's theorem, properties of polynomial functions, roots of the general cubic and quartic equations, methods of determining the roots of equations of higher degree, methods of approximating roots are among the topics treated.

5601. Non‑Euclidean Geometry (3) P: MATH 3233 or consent of instructor. Study of non‑Euclidean geometries, finite geometries, and an analysis of other geometries from the point of view of properties which remain invariant under certain transformations.

5650. Elementary Topology (3) P: MATH 2173 or 3256. Introduction to metric spaces and basic point‑set topology; open set, closed set, connectedness, compactness, and limit points.

5801. Probability Theory (3) (F) P: MATH 2173 or 3307. Axioms of probability, random variables and expectations, discrete and continuous distributions, moment generating functions, functions of random variables, the central limit theorem and applications.

MATH Banked Courses

1063. College Algebra (3)
2165, 2166. Advanced Concepts of Modern Mathematics I, II (3,3)
2182, 2183. Integrated Calculus I, II (5,5)
3219, 3220. Teaching of Elementary Mathematics K‑3 (3,0)
3221, 3222. Teaching of Elementary Mathematics 4‑6 (3,0)
3268, 3269. Analysis I, II (2,2)
3275. Numerical Analysis III (3)
5252. Modern Mathematics for Elementary Teachers II (3)
5261, 5262. Modern Mathematics for Secondary Teachers I, II (3,3)
5301, 5302. Analytical Mechanics I, II (3,3)
5321. Applied Mathematics I (3)
5331. Introduction to Celestial Mechanics (3)
5610. Applied Analysis (3)


ECU Undergraduate Catalog 2000-2001
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