ECU Undergraduate Catalog 2000-2001

RELI: RELIGIOUS STUDIES

2000. Introduction to Religious Studies (3) (S) (GE:HU) May be used toward satisfaction of RELI minor or general education humanities requirement. Introduction to religion as a historical and cultural phenomenon, exploring religion in its various dimensions: aesthetic, anthropological, ethical, historical, literary, philosophical, political, psychological, and sociological.

3000. Motherhood of God in Asian Traditions (3) (GE:SO) Same as ANTH 3009 and WOST 3000. Study of female representation of deities in Eastern traditions, including Hinduism, Mahayana Buddhism, and Taoism; examination of religious and social impact of such representation.

3930. Directed Readings in Religious Studies (3) May be repeated for a maximum of 9 s.h. credit with change of topic. P: Consent of the director of RELI. Indepth exploration of a topic chosen in consultation with the directing professor.

5000. Religious Studies Seminar (3) (F) May be repeated for credit with change of topic. P: Consent of instructor or director of RELI. Interdisciplinary seminar designed to examine selected topics in religious studies.

RONC: RADIATION ONCOLOGY

5370. Biological Effects of Radiation (3) Same as BIOL 5370. P: BIOL 1100, 1101, 1200, 1201; or consent of instructor. Survey of the biological effects resulting from the interactions of radiation and matter for scientifically and technically oriented students.

RUSS: RUSSIAN

The following courses will satisfy the general education humanities requirement: RUSS 2220, 2221.

1001. Russian Level I (3) Lab work required. No previous study of Russian or placement in RUSS 1001 by Russian placement test. First of a four-course sequence. Intensive training in the basic skills of writing, reading, speaking, and understanding Russian.

1002. Russian Level II (3) Lab work required. P: RUSS 1001 or placement in 1002 by Russian placement test. Second level of a beginning course. Further intensive training in the basic skills of the Russian language.

1003. Russian Level III (3) P: RUSS 1002 or placement in 1003 by Russian placement test. Intermediate‑level course which strengthens all language skills. Introduction to texts which enhance the study of Russian in cultural context.

1004. Russian Level IV (3) P: RUSS 1003 or placement in 1004 by Russian placement test. Second intermediate‑level course with emphasis on speaking and understanding both written and spoken Russian.

2220. Russian Prose of the Nineteenth Century in Translation (3) (GE:HU) May not count toward foreign language requirement. Taught in English. No knowledge of Russian required. Study of major prose works of nineteenth century Russian literature. Analysis of content, structure, and ideological background of major prose works by Pushkin, Lermontov, Gogol, Turgenev, Dostoevsky, and Tolstoy.

2221. Russian Prose of the Twentieth Century in Translation (3) (GE:HU) May not be used to satisfy a language requirement. Taught in English. No knowledge of Russian required. Study of various masterpieces of twentieth century Russian literature. Presentation of modern Russian literature before and after the Revolution up to the present. Consideration of works by Chekov, Gorky, Bunin, Zoschenko, Olesha, Pasternak, Nabokov, and Solzhenitsyn.

RUSS Banked Courses

2120. Russian Civilization (3)

SCIE: SCIENCE EDUCATION

2123. Early Experiences for the Prospective Teacher (1) (F) (S) Minimum of 16 hours of directed observations and planned participation in appropriate school environments and 8 hours of seminar class instruction in the teaching area. Introduction to the teaching of science designed for prospective teachers.

3100. Creativity and Inventiveness in Science (3) (S) Study of theories of creativity. Each student will be required to create and/or "invent" a product or project unique to the student's own academic major. Development and practice of each student's creative abilities will be emphasized.

3216. Teaching Science in the Elementary School (3) (F) (S) (SS) Issues and concerns in elementary science education, including planning and teaching in a field-based setting.

3350, 3351. Descriptive Astronomy (4,0) (S) 3 lecture and 3 lab hours per week. Introductory course in astronomy for prospective teachers, liberal arts majors, and others.

3360, 3361. Physical Meteorology (4,0) (F) (S) 3 lecture and 3 lab hours per week. P: CHEM 1150; MATH 1085; PHYS 1250, 1260. Principles and concepts for understanding the atmosphere and various meteorological phenomena taking place in it. These phenomena are explained using basic principles or radiation, thermodynamics, statics, and buoyancy.

3602. Investigations in Physical and Earth Science for Elementary Majors (4) (F) (S) (SS) 2 1‑hour lectures and 2 2‑hour labs per week. Series of selected topics and investigations in the physical and earth sciences. Science concepts will be treated in depth. The role of the investigative approach will be emphasized.

3604. Investigations in Life and Environmental Science for Elementary Education Majors (4) (F) (S) (SS) 2 1‑hour lectures and 2 2‑hour labs per week. Students will complete units in  the areas of life and environmental science that will help them develop skills in utilizing living organisms and the school yard environment in providing learning experiences for children.

4000. Biological Science Practicum for Secondary Teachers (1) (F) (S) (SS) 1 2‑hour lab per week. P: Minimum of 16 s.h. of biology, earth science, or physical science. Designed to aid inservice and prospective science teachers.

4010. Earth Science Practicum for Secondary Teachers (1) 1 2‑hour lab per week. P: Minimum of 16 s.h. of biology, earth science, or physical science. Designed to aid inservice and prospective science teachers.

4020. Physical Science Practicum for Secondary Teachers (1) (F) (S) (SS) 1 2‑hour lab per week. P: Minimum of 16 s.h. of biology, earth science, or physical science. Designed to aid inservice and prospective science teachers.

4319. Teaching Science in the Middle Grades (3) (F) 10 to 12 hours of field experience per week. P: Admission to upper division; EDUC 3200; MIDG 3010, 3022; SCIE 3602, 3604; or consent of instructor; C: MIDG 4001, 4010; ENGL or HIST or MIDG or MATH 4319. Methods and techniques of teaching biological, physical, and earth sciences.

4323. The Teaching of Science in High School (3) (WI) (F) (S) P: Admission to upper division. Methods and techniques of teaching biological, physical, and earth sciences.

4324. Internship in Science Education (10) (F) (S) Full-time, semester-long internship. P: Admission to upper division; SCIE 4323; C: SCIE 4325. Internship in an assigned school under the direction of a master teacher and a university supervisor.

4325. Internship Seminar: Issues in Science Education (1) (F) (S) P: Admission to upper division; C: SCIE 4324. Reflective study of issues and concerns encountered during the internship experience.

5000. Contemporary Approaches to Teaching Biological Science (3) (F) (S) P: BIOL 1100, 1101, 1200, 1201; or equivalent; a minimum of 16 s.h. in BIOL. Introduction to effective teaching in biology using the current curricula materials. Emphasis on the investigative nature of biology.

5010. Applications of Microcomputers in Teaching Physical Science (3) (F) 2 1‑hour lectures and 1 2‑hour lab per week. Introduction to the use of the microcomputer to assist in teaching physical science. Topics include operation of the microcomputer, review and evaluation of available software, and computer techniques to illustrate physical science concepts.

5020. Applications of Microcomputers in Teaching Biological Science (3) (F) Introduction to the use of the microcomputer to assist in teaching biological science. Topics include operation of the microcomputer, review and evaluation of available software, and computer techniques to illustrate biological concepts.

5990. Apprenticeship Science (3) (F) (S) (SS) Gives the student an opportunity to carry out lab procedures under the direct supervision of members of the science staff.

SCIE Banked Courses

1270. Physical Science for Elementary Education Majors (3)
1271. Physical Science for Elementary Education Majors Laboratory (1) 
1280. Life and Environmental Science for Elementary Education Majors (3) 
1281. Life and Environmental Science for Elementary Education Majors Laboratory (1) 
2110, 2111. Elements of Photography (2,0)
3010, 3011. Nature Photography (3,0)
3110, 3111. Scientific Photography (3,0)

SOCI: SOCIOLOGY

1025. Courtship and Marriage (3) (F) (S) (SS) (GE:SO) May not count toward SOCI major or minor. Designed to introduce freshman students to critical thinking and empirical knowledge relative to affectional involvement.

2110. Introduction to Sociology (3) (F) (S) (SS) (GE:SO) Nature, concepts, and principles of sociology; society, culture, socialization, groups, institutions and organizations, the class system, social change, and social processes.

2111. Modern Social Problems (3) (F) (S) (SS) (GE:SO) P: SOCI 2110. Nature, extent, causes and consequences of social problems in America today; the examination of methods of limiting and solving these problems.

3213. Introduction to Quantitative Sociology (3) (F) (S) P: SOCI 2110. Students learn the skills necessary to evaluate and interpret the quantitative analyses frequently found in technical sociological reports.

3215. Introduction to Qualitative Sociology (3) P: SOCI 2110 or consent of instructor. Survey of qualitative approaches used in sociology for the collection and analysis of data.

3216. Methods of Research (3) (F) (S) P for SOCI majors: SOCI 3213; P for all other students: MATH 2228 or equivalent approved by the instructor or PSYC 2101 or SOCI 3213. Research methods and techniques employed in sociology and the behavioral sciences.

3220. Sociology of Deviant Behavior (3) (F) (S) (SS) (GE:SO) P: SOCI 2110. Examines the extent and nature of deviance, including traditional problems such as mental illness, suicide, and crime, as well as less commonly considered organizational and occupational deviance.

3222. Rural Sociology (3) (GE:SO) P: SOCI 2110. American rural tradition and forces that have modified it; recent changes in agriculture and rural way of life, rural problems and planning in a changing society.

3225. Urban Sociology (3) (GE:SO) P: SOCI 2110. Urbanism as a way of life; organization, functions, and problems of urban communities.

3234. The Individual in Society (3) (GE:SO) P: SOCI 2110. Systematic study of symbolic interactionist theories of social interaction, socialization, and social control traced from Charles H. Cooley and George H. Mead to recent theorists.

3235. Population Trends and Problems (3) (GE:SO) P: SOCI 2110. Survey of population theory, the composition, dynamics, and mobility of populations and the problems involved in population trends.

3289. Community Organization (3) (S) (GE:SO) P: SOCI 2110. Study of theoretical perspectives and social organization in communities of varying complexity; theory and practices relative to problems of American communities.

3325. Sociology of Human Sexuality (3) (F) (GE:SO) P: SOCI 2110 or consent of instructor. Provides the student with an understanding of human sexuality as part of social behavior and social interaction. Sexuality as learned via social scripting will be emphasized.

3327. Introductory Medical Sociology (3) (GE:SO) P: SOCI 2110 or consent of instructor. General sociology focusing upon the social aspects of health and health‑related behavior.

3385. History of Sociology (3) (WI) (F)  P: SOCI 2110. Study of schools of sociological thought and development of scientific sociology from Comte to the present.

3400. Introduction to Gender and Society (3) (GE:SO) P: SOCI 2110. Survey of the various expressions of masculinity and femininity and analysis of the structure of gender inequality, with particular Attention given to the intersection of gender, race, and social class.

3410. Introduction to Maritime Sociology (3) (GE:SO) P: ANTH 1000 or SOCI 2110. Systematic study of people in the marine environment, emphasizing the interrelationship of social, economic, and technological systems.

3500. Economy and Society (3) (GE:SO) P: SOCI 2110. Survey of the current state of sociological knowledge and research on the economy as a social institution.

3600. Power and Politics in Society (3) (GE:SO) P: SOCI 2110. Survey of political sociology analyzing the relationship of state and society. Sociological perspectives on power, politics, and the state are considered by analyzing contemporary social issues, conflicts, and political alignments.

4000, 4001. Selected Topics in Sociology (3) 3 classroom and/or lab hours per week. May be repeated for a maximum of 6 s.h. credit. P: SOCI 2110; 6 s.h. of SOCI above 1999. Study of specialized topics and current developments in sociology.

4200. Advanced Techniques in Quantitative Sociology (3) (F01) 2 lecture and 2 lab hours per week. P: DSCI 2223; SOCI 3213. Techniques of statistical analysis in applied sociology are reviewed and practiced. Students learn how to select statistical methods, carry them out and present the results  in technical reports. Computer exercises using contemporary statistical software are emphasized.

4201. Advanced Techniques in Applied Research (3) (F00) P: SOCI 3216. Survey of major techniques in applied research (e.g., needs assessment, process and outcome assessment, organizational analysis, client and consumer surveys, cost-benefit analysis, key informant surveys, and focus groups) and of effective techniques for presenting the results of applied research.

4202. Special Topics in Applied Social Research (3) P: SOCI 2110 and a statistics or research design course. Topics vary based on current faculty applied research.

4320. Sociology of Law (3)  (GE:SO) P: SOCI 2110. Examines the legal system from a social perspective, emphasizing the history of legal and punishment systems, how they are organized, the socialization of participants, and alternatives to traditional organization.

4322. Law and Social Change (3) (F00) (GE:SO) P: SOCI 2110. Examination of the relationship between law and social change including an indepth analysis of the social conditions leading to, and the societal consequences of, such legal decisions as relate to desegregation, age discrimination, abortion, euthanasia, and school prayer.

4325. Marriage and the Family (3) (F) (S) (SS) (GE:SO) P: SOCI 2110. Family cycle, roles, and status of members in their relationships; family and social class; nature, causes, and consequences of family problems; methods of adjustment.

4330. Criminology (3) (GE:SO) P: SOCI 2110. Study of the nature, extent, causes, and methods of treatment and prevention of crime and delinquency.

4337. Principles of Sociology (3) (S) (GE:SO) May not count toward SOCI major. Intensive study of basic sociological concepts and their applications to the understanding of modern society.

4341. Sociology of Religion (3) (S) (GE:SO) P: SOCI 2110. Examination of the mutual effects of religion and society upon each other in the ongoing social system. Focus is upon founded religions in literate societies.

4345. Racial and Cultural Minorities (3) (F) (GE:SO) P: ANTH 1000 or SOCI 2110. Analysis of the origin and present status of American minorities; sources and consequences of prejudice and discrimination; goals and strategies of change in race and ethnic relations.

4347. Social Inequality (3) (S) (GE:SO) P: SOCI 2110. Analysis of stratification systems of various societies, emphasizing concepts and theories relative to American communities.

4350. Social Change (3) (GE:SO) P: SOCI 2110. Critical examination of theoretical perspectives and cross‑cultural analyses of social change in developed and developing societies and resulting consequences.

4385. Theoretical Perspectives and Applications (3) (WI) (F) (S) P: SOCI 2110. History and nature of sociological theory are reviewed and applied to selected social problems and social issues.

4500. Work and Organizations (3) (S) (GE:SO) P: SOCI 2110. Contemporary problems in work and organizational settings are examined from a sociological perspective.

4521, 4522, 4523. Readings in Sociology (1,2,3) (F) (S) (SS) May be repeated for a maximum of 9 s.h. credit. May count a maximum of 9 s.h. of readings in SOCI and from practicum in SOCI (SOCI 4950, 4951, 4952) toward the BA in SOCI major or minor. P: Consent of instructor and department chair. Extensive or selected readings taken from modern sociological research monographs or in specialized areas of sociology in which the student has already taken one or more courses.

4550, 4551. Honors (3,3) (F) (S) P: SOCI major; admission to the Sociology Honors Program. Eligible seniors undertake a reading, research, or service program resulting in the writing of an honors paper. Courses are taken in succession, but no grade or credit is recorded until the completion of the second course.

4800. Senior Seminar (3) (WI) (F) (S) P: SOCI major; SOCI 3216; 3385 or 4385. Integration of sociological knowledge and analysis of the meaning of current sociological issues so that students can develop their own sociological perspectives and better understand the career choices open to them.

4950, 4951, 4952. Practicum in Sociology (3,3,3) (F) (S) 140 work and academic hours per semester for 3 s.h. credit. Practicum must be arranged at least 30 days before term begins. May be taken concurrently for a maximum of 9 s.h. credit. P: SOCI major; 27 s.h. in SOCI with a minimum grade of C in each course; consent of department chair, practicum coordinator, and  faculty member who will supervise the practicum. Supervised internship in an area of applied sociology, providing practical experience in research or agency work and requiring parallel readings and study. Emphasis will be on the guided application of concepts and principles from related courses and structured readings to applied situations in the field.

5100. Seminar in Social Inequality and Diversity (3) P: SOCI 2110 and consent of instructor. Social inequality in industrial and preindustrial societies. A critical examination of theory and research in the analysis of class, race/ethnicity, gender, and social mobility patterns.

5200. Seminar in the Sociology of Health (3) P: SOCI 2110 and consent of instructor. Critical examination of the individual as health care consumer, social factors affecting the distribution of disease in the population, socio-political structure of health care services in the United States, and the health care system from the perspective of various health care providers.

5300. Seminar in Juvenile Delinquency (3) P: SOCI 2110 and consent of instructor. Examination of juvenile delinquency as a socio-legal phenomenon with special Attention to theoretical and methodological issues in the study of delinquency, consequences of and societal responses to delinquency, and prediction and intervention techniques.

5318. Social Aspects of Death and Dying (3) P: SOCI 2110 or graduate standing or consent of instructor. Systematic study of death and dying from a sociological perspective with a focus on the organizational aspects of death and dying as process and status.

5335. Sociology of Marriage Problems (3) P: SOCI 2110 and consent of instructor. Advanced study of the nature, causes, consequences, and treatment of marriage problems; supervised individual experience in sociological and counseling techniques. Designed for students planning to work in the area of marriage counseling.

5400. Seminar in Gender Roles (3) P: SOCI 2110 and consent of instructor. Examines the origins of gender roles and gender stratification; explores personal, interpersonal, and social consequences of gender; and examines alternatives to traditional gender relations.

5500. Seminar in Population (3) P: SOCI 2110 and consent of instructor. Indepth examination of the causes and consequences of population-related phenomena. Special interest is given to the 3 basic components of population change: fertility, mortality, and migration. Other topics include population structure, population aging, and urbanization.

5600. Seminar in Aging (3) P: SOCI 2110 and consent of instructor. Places the experience of aging in a social context, beginning with an examination of aging from demographic and entitlement perspectives and concluding with the application of sociological theory to changing self definition accompanying age-related functional decline.

5700. Seminar in Social Interaction (3) P: SOCI 2110 and consent of instructor. Advanced sociological survey of the empirical research on interaction in small groups and relations between group structure and personality, emphasizing microsociological research methods and results.

5800. Seminar in the Family (3) P: SOCI 2110 and consent of instructor. Comprehensive examination of sociological theories, methods, and applications involving the family and social policies. Emphasizes comparative and social historical perspectives for understanding the family in social context and change.

5900. Special Topics Seminar (3) P: SOCI 2110 and consent of instructor. Selected topics in sociology at an advanced level. Topics will vary depending on student interest and current issues in sociology.

SOCI Banked Courses

2125. The Sociology of Parenthood (3)
3214. Introduction to Quantitative Sociology (0)
3280. Industrial Sociology (2)
3285. Social Thought Before Comte (3)
3429. Sociology of Formal Organizations (3)
4960. Practicum Seminar (3)
5311. Contemporary Social Problems (3)
5314. Sociological Concepts (3)

SOCW: SOCIAL WORK

All SOCW courses numbered above 2999 are social work/criminal justice major-only courses. Students using these courses for concentrations in other degrees may be admitted to the courses with written request from their major adviser.

1010. Introduction to Social Welfare and Social Work (3) (F) (S) (SS) Designed to present a historical and philosophical overview of the development of the social work profession and social welfare institutions.

2010. Introduction to Social Work Practice with Special Populations (3) (F) (S) (SS) P: SOCW 1010. Designed to introduce the student to the dynamics of human diversity as it affects, informs, and shapes social work practice; and to foster an awareness and appreciation for diverse and special populations.

2400. Introduction to Gerontology (3) (F) (S) (GE:SO) Same as CDFR 2400 and GERO 2400. May count toward the social science general education requirement and the SOCI major or minor. Survey of current theory and research in the gerontology field presented from an interdisciplinary perspective.

3101. Human Behavior and the Social Environment I (3) (F) (S) C for SOCW major: SOCW 3201. Provides knowledge of concepts, theories, and frameworks which guide understanding about human behavior in various social environments.

3201. Social Work Practice I (3) (F) (S) P: SOCW major. Prepares students for generalist practice in social work with emphasis on the use of a generalist problem-solving process. Particular attention is given to the development of interviewing and intervention skills with individuals.

3202. Social Work Practice II (3) (F) (S) P: SOCW 3201. Continuation  of preparation for generalist social work practice and the problem-solving process. Particular attention to intervention with small groups and families. Case management skills introduced.

3301. Social Work Policy I (3) (F) (S) P: SOCW 2010. Provides knowledge of social welfare as a social system. Foci on social welfare concepts, policy, and organization. Attention given to programming in relation to social needs, social problems, and social goals.

3302. Social Work Policy II (3) (F) (S) P: SOCW major or consent of dean. Analysis of selected social legislation which may determine policy for the general welfare. Prelegislative and legislative development and major provisions of laws are considered. Interpretation of the laws will be examined from the perspective of significant court opinions related to the constitutional rights of such groups as children, welfare clients, mental patients, juvenile offenders, and persons charged with and convicted of crime.

3401. Social Work Research and Statistics (3) (WI) (F) (S) 2 lecture and 2 lab hours per week. P: SOCW major or consent of dean. Introduces students to research methods and statistics used by social workers as a part of social work practice. Students will acquire the knowledge and skill to critically review the research of others and to conduct basic statistical analysis.

4102. Human Behavior and the Social Environment II (3) (F) (S) May not receive credit for SOCW 4102 and SOCW 5001. P: SOCW 3101; C: SOCW 4203. Advanced theoretical knowledge for generalist social work practice. Sensitivity to human diversity and the need for self awareness in the selection and application of theory in practice will be emphasized.

4203. Social Work Practice III (3) (F) (S) P: SOCW 3202; C: SOCW 4102. Advanced use of problem-solving process for generalist social work practice. Students will focus on practice knowledge and skills in organizational, agency, and community interventions.

4303. Social Work Policy III (3) (F) (S) P: SOCW 3301, 3302. Involvement of the social worker in the policy-making process and the impact on worker, service delivery, and consumers. Impacts of administration and social policy on families, agencies, and professional organizations.

4400, 4401, 4402, 4403, 4404, 4405. Independent Study (1 each) (F) (S) (SS) P: Consent of dean. Faculty conferences to be arranged by student‑faculty contracts for program approved by dean. Selected readings, research, or studies related to social welfare.

4501. Crisis Intervention (3) (F) (S) P: SOCW majors or consent of dean. Designed to teach the student to recognize and intervene appropriately in crisis situations.

4503. Social Work Services in Schools (3) (F) (S) (SS) P: SOCW major or consent of dean. Provides an introduction and orientation to social work practice in school settings.

4504. Ethics in Social Work Practice (2) (F) P: SOCW major or consent of dean. Examination of the values and ethics of social work practice with emphasis on ethical decision making and the resolution of ethical dilemmas.

4505. Community Services for Children (3) (S) 3 hours per week with field trips to various community service agencies for children recommended. P: Consent of dean. Study of primary resources for children and their families. Emphasis is placed on the characteristics of families and children who may need help; adequacies and inadequacies of community resources; families and communities as social systems.

4510. Selected Topics in Human Behavior and the Social Environment (2 or 3) May be repeated for credit with a change of topic. P: SOCW major or consent of dean. Selected topics in human behavior and the social environment. Provides students the opportunity to study new or advanced topics.

4520. Selected Topics in Social Work Practice (2 or 3) May be repeated for credit with change of topic. P: SOCW major or consent of dean. Selected topics in social work practice. Provides students the opportunity to study new or advanced topics.

4530. Selected Topics in Social Work Policy (2 or 3) May be repeated for credit with a change of topic. P: SOCW major or consent of dean. Selected topics in social work policy. Provides students the opportunity to study new or advanced topics.

4540. Selected Topics in Social Work Research (2 or 3) May be repeated for credit with a change of topic. P: SOCW major or consent of dean. Selected topics in social work research. Provides students the opportunity to study new or advanced topics.

4990. Field Education and Seminar (12) (WI) (F) (S) 3 seminar hours per week; 4 days directed field education per week. Applications for admission to this course must be received 2 semesters in advance of placement. P: SOCW majors with a minimum 2.5 GPA and approval of the field education office; all required SOCW courses must be completed. Field education represents the culmination of the student's undergraduate preparation for professional practice. Students are placed in approved agencies and provided a supervised educational experience. Weekly seminar serves to help integrate theory and practice.

5001. Human Behavior and Social Environment for Human Service Professions (3) (F) May not also receive credit for SOCW 4102 and SOCW 5001. P: Consent of dean and graduate standing. Designed to assist the student in the development of a social systems concept of the bio‑psycho‑social elements of one's being. Emphasis on deeper self‑awareness of one's own behavior, attitudes, beliefs, and values as they relate to professional practice. 

5007. Women as Clients (3) (F) (S) Study of women as clients in the human service system; issues and corrective measures to counteract gender bias in service delivery; strengths and vulnerabilities of women as clients.

5008. Supervision in Social Welfare Agencies (3) P: Consent of dean. Study of supervision intervention. Examination of the role of supervision in the social welfare system, the functions it performs, the process of supervising, and the problems and issues concerning the supervisor. Special emphasis on the supervision of social work and criminal justice students who are in field placement, beginning supervisors, and supervisors of beginning workers.

5011. Perspectives on Death and Dying (3) Same as GERO 5011, NURS 5011. P: Graduate- or senior-level standing or consent of instructor. Designed to assist the student in understanding the conditions and problems associated with facing death, dying, and survivorship and to increase awareness of value and attitudes as they relate to professional practice.

5400. Seminar in Aging Studies (3) (F) (S) (SS) Same as CDFR 5400 and GERO 5400. P: Consent of instructor. Entry point for the graduate certificate in gerontology and an exit course for the undergraduate minor in gerontology. Topics include a historical perspective in aging issues, normal aging and aging pathology, aging program administration, aging policy development, research in gerontology, rural aging, and aging and ethnicity.

5900. Foundations of Social Work and Social Welfare (2) (F) P: Graduate standing in SOCW. Introduction to the social work profession and the problem-solving model as it applies to the continuum of practice at all levels.

5901, 5902, 5903. Readings in Aging Studies (1,2,or3) (F) (S) (SS) Same as CDFR 5901, 5902, 5903 and GERO 5901, 5902, 5903. May count maximum of 3 s.h. toward the graduate certificate in GERO or the baccalaureate minor in GERO. P: Consent of instructor and chairperson of instructor's home unit. Selected readings taken from monographs or journals in gerontology or aging studies. The focus is upon specialized areas in which the student has already taken one or more courses in either the graduate certificate in gerontology or the baccalaureate minor.

5920. Social Welfare Policy (3) (F) P: Graduate standing or consent of dean. Historical development and current status of social welfare policies and programs.

5940. Research Methodology for Social Workers (3) (F) P: Graduate standing or consent of dean. Introduction to research methods used by social workers in their practice. Defines research and the ethical issues in conducting research.

SOCW Banked Courses

4991, 4992. Field Education and Seminar (5,5)
5000. Organization and Management of Social Service Agencies (3)
5003. Processes of Group Intervention (3)
5005. Community Programming and Development in Social Welfare (3)
5006. Planning Within Social Welfare Agencies and Institutions (3)

SPAN: SPANISH

The following courses will satisfy the general education humanities requirement: SPAN 2550, 4555, 4556, 4557, 4558, 4560, 4561, 4562, 4563.

1001. Spanish Level I (3) (F) (S) (SS) Lab work required. Recommended early in college career for BA students and potential SPAN majors and minors. First of a four-course sequence. Focuses on the basic skills of listening, speaking, reading, and writing in Spanish with emphasis on the life and culture of the Spanish-speaking world.

1002. Spanish Level II (3) (F) (S) (SS) Lab work required. Recommended early in college career for BA student and potential SPAN majors and minors. P: SPAN 1001 or equivalent or placement by Spanish placement test. Activities increasing exposure to and command over basic skills of listening, speaking, reading, and writing in Spanish, fostering an understanding of Hispanic cultures.

1003. Spanish Level III (3) (F) (S) (SS) Lab work required. Recommended early in college career for BA students and potential SPAN majors and minors. P: SPAN 1002 or equivalent or placement by Spanish placement test. Further practice refining command over the basic skills of listening, speaking, reading, and writing in Spanish, thereby fostering an understanding of Hispanic cultures.

1004. Spanish Level IV (3) (F) (S) (SS) Recommended early in college career for BA students, and potential SPAN  majors and minors. P: SPAN 1003 or equivalent or placement by Spanish placement test. Further practice refining command over basic skills of listening, speaking, reading, and writing in Spanish. Readings are designed to further acquaint the student with life, literature, and cultures of the Hispanic world.

1220. Conversational Spanish Practiced in a Spanish‑Speaking Country (3) P: Consent of the department chair. Conversational Spanish practiced in a formal classroom situation as well as outside the classroom in a Spanish‑speaking country. Exceptions to the classroom requirement would be a Spanish language program approved by the department chair.

1440. Spanish Culture Experienced in a Spanish‑Speaking Country (2) 3 months' residence in a Spanish‑speaking country. Culture (social customs, the fine arts, architecture, historical and political influences) of a Spanish‑speaking country experienced while living in the country.

2110. Cultural Readings in Spanish (3) (F) P: SPAN 1004 or consent of department chair. Further develops language proficiency and cultural appreciation through the study of selected works of literature (including children's literature), film, and the fine arts.

2117. Spanish for Professions (3) P: SPAN 1004 or consent of department chair.  Introduction to the vocabulary and cultural concepts necessary to communicate and function effectively in the Spanish-speaking professional world.  Fields may include but are not limited to business, criminal justice, health sciences, and social sciences.

2222. Intermediate Spanish Conversation (3) (F) (S) P: SPAN 1004 or consent of department chair; RC: SPAN 2330. Designed for students with limited prior experience in a Spanish-speaking environment.  Development of oral communication skills with emphasis on the use of language in everyday situations, vocabulary growth, listening comprehension, and correctness in grammar.

2330. Intermediate Spanish Composition and Review of Grammar (3) (WI) (F) (S) P: SPAN 1004 or consent of department chair; RC: SPAN 2222. Intensive practice in task-oriented compositions and comprehensive review of grammatical forms and usage with emphasis on vocabulary development.

2440. Spanish Culture and Civilization (3) (WI) (S) P: SPAN 2222 or 2330; or consent of department chair. Study of Spain, including readings films and discussion concerning its artistic, political, historical, and social development as well as its geography and regional diversity.

2441. Latin‑American Culture and Civilization (3) (F) P: SPAN 2222 or 2330 or consent of department chair. Overview and contrastive study of the geography, history, social and political structures, currents of thought, and artistic expressions of Latin America which have contributed to contemporary life.

2550. Approaches to the Study of Hispanic Literature (3) (S) P: SPAN 2222 or 2330 or consent of department chair. Introduction to the interpretation of Spanish literature, including the study of relevant terminology and its application to representative Spanish and Spanish-American prose, poetry, and drama.

2611. Early Experiences for the Prospective Teacher (1) (S) Minimum of 16 hours of directed observations and planned participation in appropriate school environments and 8 hours of seminar class instruction in the teaching area. May not count toward BA major or minor. Introduction to the teaching of Spanish designed for prospective teachers.

2700. Special Topics in Hispanic Studies (3) May be repeated for a maximum of 6 s.h. with change of topic. P: SPAN 1004 or consent of department chair. Selected topics relating to the language, literature, culture, or civilization of Spain or Latin America.

3220. Advanced Oral Communication Through Multimedia (3) (S) P: SPAN 2222 or consent of department chair. Advanced practice in the spoken language with emphasis on discussions relating to topics of current interest.  Use of material available through the various media: newspapers, magazines, films, and radio and television broadcasts, software, and the world wide web.

3225. Spanish Phonetics (3) (S) Lab work required. P: SPAN 2222, 2330; or consent of department chair. Physiology of phonetics applied to the Spanish language. Sound system of Spanish contrasted with English.  Introduction to various dialects. Emphasis on improving pronunciation. Phonetic transcription.

3330. Advanced Composition (3) (WI) (F) (S) P: SPAN 2222 or 3220; SPAN 2330. Designed to refine writing skills in Spanish through exercises enhancing the control of grammar, expanding vocabulary, and promoting a greater awareness of rhetoric, critical reading, and revising.

3335. Structure of the Spanish Language (3) (F) P: SPAN 3330 or consent of department chair. Contemporary linguistic theory and its practical application to the teaching of the syntactic and semantic components of the Spanish language.  Prepares the student to understand the contrasting structures of Spanish and English.

3340. Introduction to Translation (3) (S) P: SPAN 3330 or consent of department chair; RC: SPAN 3335. Introduction to the history, theory, and techniques of translation, and intense practice in both directions (Spanish-English, English-Spanish) with short prose texts from areas of general knowledge, such as those dealing with cultural information and current events.

3700. Special Topics in Hispanic Studies (3) May be repeated for a maximum of 6 s.h. credit with change of topic. P: SPAN 2222 or 3220; 2330; or consent of department chair. Selected topics relating to the language, literature, and culture or  civilization of Spain or Latin America.

4340. Intermediate Translation (3) (F) P: SPAN 3335, 3340; or consent of department chair. Further practice in Spanish-English and English-Spanish translation with longer texts from areas of general knowledge, introduction to the translation of specialized material (such as business, medical and legal documents, and literary texts), and study of related lexical and stylistic problems.

4555. Medieval Spain (900-1499) (3) (WI) P: SPAN 2440, 2550; or consent of department chair. Study of selected texts of Medieval Spain from the primitive lyric to La Celestina examined against the background of cultural, social, and historical transformations of the Spanish Middle Ages.

4556. Renaissance and Baroque Spain (1500‑1681) (3) P: SPAN 2440, 2550; or consent of department chair. Reading and discussion of representative works from the drama, poetry, and prose of the great literary figures of the Renaissance and Golden Age (such as Garcilaso de la Vega, the Mystics, Cervantes, Lope de Vega, Calderon de la Barca, Gongora) together with a study of the cultural, social, and political factors that influenced their development.

4557. Spain from Neo‑Classicism to Realism (1681-1898) (3)  P: SPAN 2440, 2550; or consent of department chair. Study of selected texts from Spain from the Neoclassic Period to the end of the nineteenth century emphasizing their social, political, and cultural context.

4558. Contemporary Spain (1898-Present) (3)  P: SPAN 2440, 2550; or consent of department chair.  Study of selected texts of contemporary Spain analyzed in the social, political, and cultural contexts of monarch, republic, dictatorship, and democracy.

4560. Major Latin‑American Authors (3) P: SPAN 2441, 2550; or consent of department chair. Survey of the evolution of Latin-American literature from the period of discovery to the present examined through readings and discussion of representative writers, movements, and genres within the context of political, social, historical, and artistic realities.

4561. Latin-American Texts of the Pre-Columbian and Colonial Periods (3) P: SPAN 2441, 2550; or consent of department chair; RP: SPAN 4560. Study of the development of Latin-American literature and culture through the analysis of representative texts from late Pre-Columbian times through the Colonial Period.

4562. Latin-American Texts of the Nineteenth and Early Twentieth Centuries (3)  P: SPAN 2441, 2550; or consent of department chair; RP: SPAN 4560. Study of representative literary works and reappraisal of critical problems and themes within the aesthetic framework of the movements of Neoclassicism, Romanticism, Realism, Naturalism, Modernism, and the Avantgarde, and within the political, social, and economic realities of the period from Independence to the early twentieth century.

4563. Latin-American Texts: The Boom and Beyond (3)  P: SPAN 2441, 2550; or consent of department chair; RP: SPAN 4560. Major Latin‑American writers from the mid-twentieth century to the present.

4611. Teaching Second Languages in Grades K‑12 (5) (F) 5 lectures per week and approximately 60 hours of field experience per semester.  May not be used to fulfill requirements for BA major or minor. P: 18 s.h. of SPAN above 1004 or consent of department chair. Modern methodologies, techniques and strategies, instructional resources, and evaluation procedures for teaching second languages in grades K‑12.

4700. Special Topics in Hispanic Studies (3) May be repeated for a maximum of 6 s.h. of credit with change of topic. P: Consent of department chair. Selected topics relating to the language, literature, culture or civilization of Spain or Latin America.

4880. Internship in Spanish (10) Full-time, semester-long internship. P: Admission to upper division; SPAN 2110, 2440, 2441, 3225, 3330; 15 s.h. in SPAN above 2999, including 9 s.h. in SPAN 4555, 4556, 4557, 4558, 4560, 4561, 4562, 4563, with a minimum of 3 s.h. in SPAN 4555, 4556, 4557, 4558 and 3 s.h. in SPAN 4560, 4561, 4562, 4563. Observation and supervised internship in an assigned Spanish K-12 public school classroom.

4881. Internship Seminar: Issues in Spanish Teaching (1) P: Admission to upper division; C: SPAN 4880. Individualized study of problems or issues related to teaching Spanish.

4882. Internship for Professions (3) P: Consent of department chair. Supervised internship during the junior or senior year of the Hispanic studies degree program in an appropriate professional setting. Fields may include, but are not limited to, business, criminal justice, health sciences, and social sciences.

4950, 4951, 4952, 4953, 4954. Directed Readings in Spanish (1 each) P: Consent of department chair. Indepth exploration of selected topics relating to the language, literature, culture or civilization of Spain or Latin America.

4990. Honors (3) Open to students having a minimum 3.5 GPA in SPAN. Independent study  of a selected aspect of Spanish culture under the direction of a faculty member in the student's major area of interest.

5340. Advanced Translation I (3) (F) P: SPAN 4340. Practice of the translation skills introduced in SPAN, with greater variety of style and subject matter.

5440. Contemporary Issues of the Hispanic World (3) May be repeated for a maximum of 6 s.h. credit with a change of topic. P: Consent of department chair. Study of selected events, artistic trends, and currents of thought that significantly contribute to life in contemporary Hispanic societies.

5445. Hispanic Cinema (3) May be repeated for a maximum of 6 s.h. credit with a change of topic. P: Consent of department chair. Study of Hispanic cinema as cultural product reflecting social, political, and economic realities as well as in terms of its power to represent, to inform, and to create. Viewing and discussion of films by representative directors.

5550. Hispanic Women Writers (3) May be repeated for a maximum of 6 s.h. credit with change of topic. May not be repeated for credit by students in the Women's Studies program. P: Consent of department chair. Indepth study and discussion of representative writings by women in Hispanic countries with special attention to the relationships between society and the origin, content, and form of the texts. Works will be selected from a variety of genres.

5700.  Special Topics in Hispanic Studies (3) May be repeated for a maximum of 6 s.h. credit with change of topic. P: Consent of department chair. Selected topics relating to the language, literature, culture or civilization of Spain or Latin America.

5940. Advanced Translation II (3) (S) Candidates who successfully complete this course may be allowed to take qualifying exams for award of the Certificate in Spanish Translation. P: SPAN 5340. Continuation of the skills practiced in SPAN 4340 and 5340 at advanced level, entailing the translation of written texts in a variety of styles and on different topics, from Spanish into English and vice versa.

SPAN Banked Courses

1060. Spanish for Reading Knowledge (0)
3005. Spanish Business Communication (3)
3006. Spanish for International Business (3)
3290. Spanish Poetry (3)
4319. Teaching Foreign Languages in the Middle Grades (3)
4350. The Spanish Novel (3)
4360. Spanish Theatre (3)
4385. History of the Spanish Language (3)

SPCH: SPEECH

2510. Public Speaking (3) (F) (S) (SS) (GE:FA) 1 lecture and 2 lab hours per week. Means of public address, the outlining and presentation of speeches for all occasions, including informative, persuasive, and ceremonial.

2520. Business and Professional Communication (3) (F) (S) (SS) (GE:FA) 1 lecture and 2 lab hours per week. For noncommunication majors. Prepares the business or professional student for effective oral communication in the work place.

SPED: SPECIAL EDUCATION

2000. Introduction to Exceptional Children (2) (F) (S) (SS) General survey of the areas of exceptionality: incidence, causes, education, and rehabilitation of exceptional children.

2102. Introduction to Mental Retardation (3) (F) (S) (SS) Comprehensive survey of mental retardation, with emphasis on etiology, characteristics, diagnosis, institutionalization, social and family relationship, multicultural education, and historical aspects of mental retardation.

2103. Introduction to Learning Disabilities (3) (F) (S) (SS) 3 lecture hours and 1 lab/studio hours per week. P: SPED 2000. Comprehensive survey of learning disabilities with emphasis on characteristics, theoretical explanations and models, assessments, and placement alternatives.

2104. Introduction to Behavior Disorders (3) (F) (SS) P: SPED 2000. Comprehensive survey of behavior disorders with emphasis on characteristics, theoretical explanations and models, assessments, and placement alternatives.

2123. Early Experiences for Prospective Teachers (1) (F) (S) C: SPED 2000. Minimum of 16 hours of directed observations and planned participation in appropriate school environments and 8 hours of seminar class instruction in the teaching area. Introduction to the teaching of exceptional children designed for prospective teachers.

3000. Instructional Programming in Special Education (3) (F) (SS) Development of knowledge and skills fundamental to effective teaching of handicapped learners. Areas emphasized include assessment, instructional planning, classroom management, and program evaluation.

3210. Instructional Programming in Mental Retardation (3) (S) (SS) P: Admission to upper division; SPED 2102, 3000; C: SPED 3211. Development of appropriate diagnostic and remedial interventions for teaching the mildly and moderately mentally retarded. Practical application of a variety of methods and settings used in the instruction of the mentally retarded child.

3211. Practicum in Mental Retardation (2) (F) (S) Must be taken semester prior to internship in special education. P: SPED 3210. Minimum of 20 hours of directed observation and planned participation with mentally handicapped children in an appropriate school environment.

3310. Instructional Programming in Learning Disabilities (3) (S) (SS) P: Admission to upper division; SPED 2103, 3000; C: SPED 3311. Development of appropriate diagnostic and remedial interventions for the teaching of learning-disabled students.

3311. Practicum in Learning Disabilities (2) (F) (S) Must be taken semester prior to internship in special education. P: SPED 3310. Minimum of 20 hours of directed observation and planned participation with learning-disabled children in an appropriate school environment.

3410. Instructional Programming in Behavior Disorders (3) (S) (SS) P: Admission to upper division; SPED 2104, 3000; C: SPED 3411. Development of appropriate management interventions based upon individual needs of the child. Practical application of a variety of methods and settings used in the instruction of the behavior‑disordered child.

3411. Practicum in Behavior Disorders (2) (F) (S) Must be taken semester prior to internship in special education. P: SPED 3410. Minimum of 20 hours of directed observation and planned participation with behavior‑disordered children in an appropriate school environment.

3510. Methods in Early Childhood Special Education (3) (S) P: Admission to upper division; SPED 3000; C: SPED 3511. Development of skills in the areas of assessment, classroom organization, interagency collaboration, family consultation, inclusion and educational plan development as they relate to meeting the needs of preschool children with disabilities and their families.

3511. Practicum in Early Childhood Special Education (1) (F) (S) C: SPED 3510. Minimum of 30 hours of directed observation and planned participation in an appropriate school environment with preschool disabled children.

4000. Technology in Special Education (3) (F) (S) (SS) 3 lecture and 2 lab hours per week. P: SPED 2000. Introduction to the use of instructional technology in special education settings. Specialized hardware and software, including a variety of adaptive and assistive devices, computer adaptations and peripherals, special educational instructional and productivity software, and issues related to each of these areas will be emphasized.

4010. Exceptional Students in the Regular Classroom (2) (F) (S) 2 lecture and 1 lab hours per week. RP: SPED 2000. Development of knowledge and skills fundamental to effective teaching of exceptional learners in the regular classroom. Emphasis on individualization, content modification, instructional techniques, and classroom management.

4302. Education and Retardation (2) P: Consent of instructor. Basic information about the educational programs for trainable and educable retardates with special Attention given to curriculum development and special programs in public school and institutional settings.

4324. Internship in special Education (10) (F) (S) Full-time, semester-long internship. P: Admission to upper division; SPED 3000, 4000. Observation and teaching in an assigned special education public school classroom.

4352. Seminar in Mental Retardation (2) (F) (S) C: SPED 4324. Integration of theory, research, ethics, and legislation as applied to teaching mentally handicapped students. Effective teaching and reflective thinking skills are emphasized.

4353. Seminar in Learning Disabilities (2) (F) (S) C: SPED 4324. Integration of theory, research, ethics, and legislation as applied to teaching mentally handicapped students. Effective teaching and reflective thinking skills are emphasized.

4354. Seminar in Behaviorally Emotionally Handicapped (2) (F) (S) C: SPED 4324. Integration of theory, research, ethics, and legislation as applied to teaching mentally handicapped students. Effective teaching and reflective thinking skills are emphasized.

5101. Introduction to Exceptional Children (3) (F) (S) (SS) Information on incidence, nature, causes, rehabilitation, and education of exceptional children.

5102. Perspectives in Mental Retardation (3) (F) (SS) Emphasis on historical perspectives, educational terminology, and the responsibility of the community, school, homes, and institutions for the prevention of mental retardation and the care and education of mentally retarded persons.

5301. Tests and Measurements in Special Education (3) (F) (SS) P: Consent of instructor. Basic theory testing considered in terms of exceptional children.

5501, 5502. Minor Problems in Special Education (3,3) (5501 WI) (F) (S) (SS) Each may be repeated for a maximum of 6 s.h. credit. P: Consent of instructor. Conference, library, or lab work in an area of special education.

SPED BANKED COURSES

4301. Remedial Reading for Handicapped Children (2)

THEA: THEATRE ARTS

1000. Introduction to Theatre (2) (F) (S) (SS) (GE:FA) For non-theatre arts majors. Concerns the audience's appreciation of the art of the playwright, actor, director, and designer.

1010. Introduction to Acting I (3) (F) (S) (SS) (GE:FA) Introduction to acting through the use of exercises and improvisational techniques.

1020. Introduction to Acting II (3) (S) P: THEA 1010. Introduction to acting through the use of exercises, improvisations, and scenes.

2001. Stage Scenery I (3) (F) (S) (GE:FA) Introduction to backstage organization and the basic scenery production methods through lectures and mandatory participation in construction and running crews on department productions.

2002. Stage Scenery II (3) (F) (S) (GE:FA) P: THEA 2001. Introduction to backstage organization and the basic scenery production methods through lectures and mandatory participation in construction and running crews on department productions.

2003. Scene Painting (3) (GE:FA) 4 hours per week. P: THEA 2001, 2002. Study of scene painting techniques and materials.

2006. The Art of Make‑up (1) (F) (S) P: THEA major; C: THEA 2007. Basic knowledge of materials and techniques involved in the art of make‑up for the stage.

2007.  Make‑up Laboratory (1) (F) (S) C: THEA 2006.

2009. Decor and Ornament for the Stage (3) (GE:FA) Survey of decorative modes in Western civilization from the Renaissance to the present.

2010. Professional Acting Technique I (3) (F) 6 hours per week. P: THEA 1020 and audition and faculty jury. Introduction to the reality of doing, the repetition exercise, adjustment with fellow actor, independent activity, justification, and simple objectives. To free the impulses of the young actor within the structure of the improvisational exercise. Scene work and auditions for department productions are required.

2015. Voice and Articulation (3) (F) (S) (SS) P: Intended THEA, DNCE, or EMST media performance or electronic news majors. Designed to develop personal and professional speech effectiveness.

2016. Vocal Production for the Actor (3) (F) P: THEA 2015; professional acting and musical theatre major; or consent of instructor. Exercises designed to improve and develop the actor's voice.

2020. Professional Acting Technique II (3) (S) 6 hours per week. P: THEA 2010. Beginning work with daydream. Incorporation of emotional preparation into repetition exercise. Enriched work on personalizing imaginary circumstances. Introduction to relationship. To sustain the young actor with true inner life from moment to unanticipated moment. Scene work and auditions for department productions are required.

2035. Literature for the Theatre (3) (WI) (S) (GE:FA) Survey of important plays emphasizing a systematic approach to analysis for production.

2123. Early Experiences for the Prospective Teacher (1) Minimum of 16 hours of directed observations and planned participation in appropriate school environments and 8 hours of seminar class instruction in the teaching area. May not count toward a BA major or minor. Introduction to the teaching of theatre arts designed for prospective teachers.

3000, 3001. Special Theatre Projects (1,1) May not be taken concurrently with THEA 2001 or 2002. P: Consent of instructor. Special projects in various areas of theatre production and performance supervised by the faculty.

3002. Advanced Theatrical Drafting (3) (F) P: THEA 2002 or consent of instructor. Introduction to advanced theatrical drafting techniques and tools with a primary focus on computer-aided drafting.

3003. Stage Lighting (3) (F) (S) P: Consent of instructor. Theory and practice of the methods of stage lighting.

3004. Scenery Design I (3) (F) P: THEA 2002 or consent of instructor. Principles of scenery design for production.

3005. Scenery Design II (3) P: THEA 3004. Further development of design responses and rendering ability.

3007. Costume Design (3) (F) (S) (GE:FA) 3 lecture and 2 lab hours per week. Introductory course in the principles and process of stage costume design.

3008. Advanced Costume Design (3) 6 studio hours per week. P: THEA 3007 or consent of instructor. Studio course in costume design for the stage. Emphasis is on the design process through the design phase with concentration on character development and rendering skills.

3010. Professional Acting Technique III (3) (F) 6 hours per week. P: THEA 2020. Introduction to interpretation with emotional colors of previous work. Introduction to characterization work through a physical impediment. Introduction of character idea. To organize and synchronize the student to the role. Scene work and auditions for department productions are required.

3015. Oral Interpretation (3) (S) P: THEA 2015 or consent of instructor.  Trains the student to read aloud prose, narrative, dialogue, and poetry to an audience.

3020. Professional Acting Technique IV (3) (S) 6 hours per week. P: THEA 3010. Introduction of monologue work; text work includes actions, beats, paraphrasing, phrasing, particularizations, and justification. To play the reality of action from a consistent and meaningful point of view. Scene work and auditions for department productions are required.

3025. Intermediate Voice and Articulation (3) (F) (S) P: THEA 2015 or consent of instructor. Develops professional competence in pronunciation, intonation, and the strenuous use of the voice.

3050. Advanced Acting I (3) Advanced acting training for students not involved in THEA 2010‑3020. Provides the actor with a basic approach to role development through intensive scene study and improvisational exercises.

3055. History of the American Musical Theatre (3) (WI) (S) Same as MUSC 3055. P: MUSC 2166 or consent of instructor. Styles and periods of the American musical theatre.

3060. Advanced Acting II (3) P: THEA 3050. Continued role development through intensive scene study and improvisational exercises.

3070. Directing I (3) (WI) (F) P: THEA 1010 or 2020. Practical study of techniques and methods of directing a play. Students are required to work as a stage manager on one departmental production.

3080. Directing II (3) (S) P: THEA 3070. Practical work in staging a play and coordinating an entire production. Students are required to work as a stage manager on one department production.

3090. Musical Theatre Performance Techniques I (3) (F) 2, 2‑hour weekly performance labs and/or lectures. P: THEA 1020; demonstrated vocal skill; and/or consent of instructor. First of a four-part process-oriented approach to analyzing and developing musical and dramatic techniques for performing musical material in  context of its original setting. Music from the standard Broadway repertoire is used.

3095. Musical Theatre Performance Techniques II (3) (S) 2, 2-hour weekly performance labs. P: THEA 3090; audition or consent of instructor. Continuation of the technical development begun in THEA 3090; difficulty level increases musically and dramatically, with emphasis on lyric analysis and period musical styles.

3501, 3502, 3503. Independent Study in Theatre (1,2,3) (F) (S) (SS) (GE:FA) May be repeated for a maximum of 4 s.h. credit with a change of topic. P: Consent of instructor and department chair. Independent study of scholarly topic related to theatre.

3601, 3602, 3603. Selected Topics in Theatre (1,2,3) (3603: WI*) (F) (S) (SS) (GE:FA) May be repeated for a maximum of 4 s.h. credit with a change of topic. P: Consent of instructor and department chair. Intensive study of selected topics related to theatre.

4000, 4001. Special Theatre Projects (1,1)  May not be taken concurrently with THEA 2001 or 2002. P: Consent of instructor. Special projects in various areas of theatre production and performance supervised by the faculty.

4002. Advanced Technical Production (6) Minimum of 280 work and academic hours per semester. P: Junior standing and consent of instructor. Supervised internship in an area of technical production, providing extensive practical experience and emphasizing professional methods in a group situation, and requiring parallel readings and study.

4003. Advanced Stage Lighting (3) 4 classroom and/or lab hours per week. P: THEA 3003 or consent of instructor. Advanced theory and application of lighting design for the theatre.

4025. Television and Film Practicum for the Actor I (3) (F) 6 hours per week. P: THEA 3020; or consent of instructor. Development of the actor's craft and instrument as they are used as expressive tools for the film media. Included are the major genres in TV/film, both in the studio and on location. Auditions for departmental productions are required.

4026. Television and Film Practicum for the Actor II (3)  6 hours per week. P: THEA 4025 or consent of instructor. Continued development of the actor's craft and instrument as they are used as expressive tools for the film media. Included are the major genres in TV/film, both in the studio and on location. Auditions for department productions are required.

4030. Creative Dramatics (3) (S) (GE:FA) Involves informal, improvised dramatics with children and the preparation of leaders to conduct such sessions in the school and community.

4031. Dialects for the Stage (2) (S) P: THEA 2020 or consent of instructor. Selected dialects for the performer.

4036. Playwriting (2) (WI) Structure of a play as a piece of writing with special emphasis on the actual writing of one‑act plays.

4055. Theatre History I (3) (F) (GE:FA) Significant developments in the theatre from its beginning to the nineteenth century.

4056. Theatre History II (3) (S) (GE:FA) Significant developments from the last quarter of the nineteenth century to the present.

4065. Stage Management (3) (F) (S) (GE:FA) 2 lecture and 1 lab/studio hours per week. Duties and operating procedures of the stage manager in the professional and nonprofessional theatre.

4066. Theatre Management (3) (F) (S) (GE:FA) Theory and practice of administration for nonprofit and commercial theatres. Involves the study of theatre unions, financial considerations, promotion, grantsmanship, audience development, and career opportunities in the field of theatre management.

4070. Professional Preparation and Audition Technique for Actors (3) (WI) (S) 2 lecture and 2 lab hours per week. P: THEA 4025. Practical study for performers in preparation for the professional entertainment industry market. Includes development of a diverse audition repertoire and various market-entry skills. Auditions for departmental productions required.

4080. Musical Theatre Practicum (1)  P: THEA 3095. Faculty supervised senior recitals for graduating performers in the BFA musical theatre concentration.

4090. Musical Theatre Performance Technique III (3) (F) 4 studio hours per week. P: THEA 2035, 3095. Musical material–solos, duets, and trios–from the Broadway repertoire is utilized for advanced in context scene study.

4095. Musical Theatre Performance Technique IV (3) (S) 4 studio hours per week. P: THEA 4090. Audition technique and preparation for a mock audition performed for a jury of stage directors at the end of the semester.

4099. Design and Production Portfolio (1) 3 hours per week. P: Junior or senior standing and consent of instructor. Assembly and presentation of a portfolio and resume in the area of theatrical scenography.

4323. The Teaching of Theatre Arts in Grades K‑12 (3) May not count toward BA major or minor. Examination of teaching methods and practice application of theory.

4324. Internship in Theater Education (10) Full-time, semester-long internship. P: Admission to upper division; THEA 2123; C: THEA 4325. Observation and supervised teaching in an assigned  theatre arts public school classroom.

4325. Internship Seminar: Issues in Theater Education (1) P: Admission to upper division; C: THEA 4324. Individualized study of problems or issues pertinent in   theatre education.

5000. Dramatic Arts Workshop (3) Presentation and evaluation of workshop projects in various aspects of theatre arts.

THEA Banked Courses

2005. Oral Communication (2) 
2200. Creative Dance and Drama for the Elementary School (2)
3027, 4027, 4028. Vocal Production Laboratory I, II, III  (1,1,1) 
3030. Acting I (3)
3040. Acting II (3)
4010. Master Class in Advanced Acting I (3)
4021. Master Class in Advanced Acting II (3)
4029. Advanced Oral Interpretation (2)
4032. Dialects for the Stage (2)

WOST: WOMEN'S STUDIES

2000. Introduction to Women's Studies: Humanities (3) (F) (S) (SS) (GE:HU) May receive credit for only one of WOST 2000, 2200, 2400. Interdisciplinary approach to the study of women in society, stressing women as contributors to that society and to their own human development.

2200. Introduction to Women's Studies: Arts (3) (GE:FA) May receive credit for only one of WOST 2000, 2200, 2400. Interdisciplinary approach to the study of women in society, stressing women as artists and subjects of art.

2400. Introduction to Women's Studies: Social Sciences (3) (GE:SO) May receive credit for only one of WOST 2000, 2200, 2400. Interdisciplinary approach to the study of women in society, stressing historical and contemporary roles of women as contributors to that society and to their own human development.

3000. Motherhood of God in Asian Traditions (3) (GE:SO) Same as ANTH 3009 and RELI 3000. Study of female representation of deities in Eastern traditions, including Hinduism, Mahayana Buddhism, and Taoism; examination of religious and social impact of such representation.

3500. Selected Topics in Women's Studies (3) May be repeated for credit with change of topic. P: WOST 2000 or 2200 or 2400 or consent of program director.

3910, 3920, 3930. Directed Readings in Women's Studies (1,1,1) (F) (S) (SS) P: WOST 2000 or 2200 or 2400; consent of instructor or director. Directed study based on the needs and interests of individual students in the women's studies program.

4000. Senior Seminar in Women's Studies (3) (S) P: WOST 2000 or 2200 or 2400; additional 3 s.h. in WOST; or consent of instructor. Interdisciplinary seminar in women's studies.

4200. Feminist Theory (3) (WI) (F) P: WOST 2000 or 2200 or 2400; 1 other course accepted for WOST major or minor. Study of the origin, development, and praxis of contemporary feminist theories.

4500. Internship in Women’s Studies (3) (F) (S) (SS) P: Senior standing; WOST 4000; minimum 2.5 GPA or consent of director. Supervised work experience in women-centered community projects.

5000. Advanced Seminar in Women's Studies (3) (S) P: Consent of instructor. Interdisciplinary course designed to analyze the history and development of feminist theories which shape the field of women's studies. Readings will reflect an international and multi‑ethnic perspective by including materials from a variety of countries and cultures.


ECU Undergraduate Catalog 2000-2001