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EAST CAROLINA UNIVERSITY

2004-2005 FACULTY SENATE

 

The sixth regular meeting of the 2004/2005 Faculty Senate will be held on

Tuesday, February 22, 2005, at 2:10 p.m. in the Mendenhall Student Center Great Room.

 

FULL AGENDA

  I.  Call to Order

 

 II.  Approval of Minutes   

 

      January 25, 2005

 

III.  Special Order of the Day

 

      A.  Roll Call

 

      B.  Announcements

 

      C.  Steve Ballard, Chancellor

           

      D.  Bill Shelton, Vice Chancellor for Institutional Advancement
Vice Chancellor’s Report

 

      E.  Moment in History, Henry Ferrell

 

F.   John Cope, Faculty Assembly Delegate

      Report on Faculty Assembly meeting of February 4, 2005.

      Resolution on Minimum Standards of Governance (attachment 1).

 

      G.  Election of Faculty Officers Nominating Committee

            According to ECU Faculty Manual, Appendix A, Section VII.

 

      H.  Catherine Rigsby, Chair of the Faculty

 

I.    Question Period

 

IV.Unfinished Business

 

These items were tabled at the last meeting. To be considered at this meeting, a motion must be made and passed to remove the items from the table.

 

A.  Academic Standards Committee, George Bailey

      Proposed Revised Goals of the Liberal Arts Foundations Curriculum (attachment 2).

 

B.  Resolution on Graduation with Distinction, Mohammad Tabrizi (attachment 3).

 

V.   Report of Committees

 

A.  University Curriculum Committee, Timothy Hudson

      Curriculum matters contained in the minutes of the January 27, 2005, and February 10, 2005, meetings.

 

B.  Committee on Committees, Henry Ferrell

      1.   First Reading of a Proposed Addition to the Charges of all Faculty Senate Academic

            Committees (attachment 4).

2.      First Reading of the Academic University Athletics Committee Charge (attachment 5).

 

C. Educational Policies and Planning Committee, Charles Hodson

      For Information Only:

      1.  Notification of Intent to Plan a MS in Software Engineering.

      2.  Request for Authorization to Establish a BS in Sports Studies.

      3.  Request for Authorization to Establish a New Interdisciplinary Minor in Russian Studies.

 

D.  Faculty Governance Committee, Dee Dee Glascoff

      1.  Interpretation to the ECU Faculty Manual, Appendix L (attachment 6).

      2.  Proposed Revision to the ECU Faculty Manual, Appendix L (attachment 7).       

      3.  Proposed Revision to the ECU Faculty Manual, Appendix C (attachment 8).       

      4.  First Reading of Proposed Revisions to the ECU Faculty Manual, Appendix A

           (attachment 9).    

      5.  First Reading of Proposed Revisions to the ECU Faculty Manual, Appendix A

           By-Laws (attachment 10).          

 

E.  Unit Code Screening Committee, Garris Conner
Approval of the following Unit Codes of Operation. 
1
.  New Department of Nutrition and Hospitality Management Unit Code.
2
.  Revised Department of Mathematics Unit Code.

     

      All approved unit codes are available via the Committee’s website at: http://www.ecu.edu/fsonline/AcademicCommittees/uc/codes/unitcodes.htm

 

VI.       New Business

        

 

Faculty Senate Agenda

February 22, 2005

Attachment 1.

UNC FACULTY ASSEMBLY REPORT

Resolution on Minimum Standards of Governance

 

Motion of the Governance Committee (adopted 2/4/05):

 

Be it resolved that the Faculty Assembly directs the Governance Committee (1) to send the following draft document to the senates/councils of the 16 UNC campuses for their comments and recommendations prior to the April 2005 meeting and (2) to present the revised document to the Assembly at that meeting with a recommendation for its ratification.

 

Written comments and recommendations on this resolution should be forwarded to Catherine Rigsby, Chair of the Faculty, at rigsbyc@mail.ecu.edu.

 

Shared Governance on the 16 UNC Campuses
Minimum Standards of Governance

A strong tradition of shared governance is essential to the excellence of any institution of higher learning. The Faculty Assembly recognizes the following as minimum essential standards of governance that must be in place on each of the 16 campuses of the University of North Carolina.

 

The Faculty Senate or Council

1.   The faculty must be represented by an elected Faculty Senate or Council that holds regularly scheduled meetings throughout the academic year.

2.   With few exceptions, voting membership of the senate/council must be limited to elected faculty representatives.

3.   Members of the senate/council must represent departments, colleges, schools, or comparable academic units and must be elected directly by the faculty of those units.

4.   The officers of the senate/council, including its presiding officer (president or chair), must be elected by the membership of that body or by the faculty as a whole.

5.   Procedures for the election of the senate/council's membership and officers, as well as their responsibilities and terms of office, must be codified in published bylaws or other document approved by and amendable by the senate/council.

6.   Procedures for the operation of the senate/council and its committees must be codified in published bylaws approved by and amendable by the senate/council.

7.   The senate/council must be given adequate resources to ensure effective governance, including:

a.   an adequate budget

b.   reasonable authority over its budget

c.   adequate office space

d.   adequate secretarial support

e.   appropriate release time for the chair/president

 

Faculty Governance Responsibilities

1.   The responsibilities and procedures of faculty governance must be codified in a published governance document approved by and amendable by the faculty or their elected representatives.

2.   The university's curriculum is primarily the responsibility of its faculty. The faculty, through its elected senate/council (or through its delegated faculty committees or through elected faculty councils of its colleges and schools) must give approval to campus curricular policies prior to their implementation, including but not limited to the following:

a.   graduation requirements

b.   "basic studies"/"general education" requirements for undergraduates

c.   the establishment of all new departments, schools, and colleges

d.   the establishment of new degree programs (including online programs)

e.   establishment of or substantive changes to majors

f.    the elimination or consolidation of degree programs or departments (except in cases of declared financial exigency)

g.   the establishment of individual new courses

h.   campus admission and retention policies

i.    attendance and grading policies

j.    grade-appeal procedures

k.   drop/add policies

l.    course-repeat policies

m.  policies for graduation with honors and for honors programs

n.   honor-code policies

o.   the granting of honorary degrees

3.   The faculty, through its elected senate/council and consistent with policies in The Code, must exercise authority to determine and amend campus policies of reappointment, tenure, and promotion, and of post-tenure review; all revisions to those policies, without exception, must be ratified by the senate/council.

4.   The faculty, through its elected senate/council, must approve faculty handbooks and academic policy manuals (and campus policies therein).

5.   For joint committees on which the faculty is represented:

a.   Faculty representation must appropriately reflect the degree of the faculty's stake in the issue or area the committee is charged with addressing.

b.   The faculty members of joint committees must be selected by the elected faculty leadership or by processes approved by the senate/council.

 

Administration-Faculty Collegiality

1.   A collegial, candid, and cooperative relationship should exist between the administration and the faculty. When requested, administrators should report to the senate/council and respond to questions.

2.   Except on rare occasions, senior administrators should uphold the decisions of the senate/council in areas in which the faculty has primary responsibility, such as curriculum and tenure/promotion policies.

3.   The chancellor and other senior administrators should consult in a timely way and seek meaningful faculty input on issues in which the faculty has an appropriate interest but not primary responsibility, including but not limited to the following:

a.   the university mission, emphases, and goals

b.   budget

c.   campus master plan or strategic plan

d.   building construction

e.   enrollment growth

4.   The chancellor should effectively advocate the principles of shared governance to the Board of Trustees.

5.   The chancellor should typically sustain the recommendations of faculty tenure, hearings, and grievance committees.

6.   When the chancellor acts against the recommendations of such committees, the chancellor should meet with the committee or otherwise adequately communicate the reasons for not sustaining its recommendations.

7.   The Board of Trustees should exercise due respect for the governance prerogatives of the faculty.

8.   The faculty should participate meaningfully in the selection of academic administrators (through membership on search/hiring committees and the opportunity to meet and comment on "short-listed" candidates before hiring decisions are made).

9.   The professorial-rank faculty of each department should approve the appointment and reappointment of its department head/chairperson.

10.The professorial-rank faculty of each department should approve the term of office of its department head/chairperson.

11.Each full-time faculty member should regularly evaluate the performance of senior administrators.

a.   The faculty’s evaluation of administrators should be in addition to and independent of the mandated periodic evaluation of administrators.

b.   Administrators evaluated by faculty should include the chancellor, the provost, the faculty member's college/school dean, and the faculty member's department head/chair.

c.   The faculty should determine the questions and format of the faculty evaluations of senior administrators.

d.   The results of these evaluations should be made available, at a minimum, to the person evaluated and to that person's immediate supervisor.

 

Noncompliant Campuses

It is the responsibility of the faculty of each campus to advocate, seek, and monitor the campus's adherence to the Minimum Standards of Governance. When a campus is not in compliance with one or more standards, faculty should seek resolution through processes at the campus level. However, when the faculty's sustained efforts to secure compliance have not been successful, the faculty, either through its senate/council or by the action of one or more faculty members, is encouraged to consult with the officers of the Faculty Assembly.

 

In cases that, in the judgment of the Assembly's officers, may constitute serious noncompliance, the Assembly's officers may authorize appointment of an ad hoc panel to investigate and prepare a report. The members of an investigating panel are faculty members from other campuses who have no previous involvement in compliance issues on that campus. The panel is asked to visit the campus alleged to be noncompliant, to meet with parties in the faculty and administration, and to prepare a report for submission to the Assembly's Governance Committee. The investigating panel's draft report recounts the facts of the case and sets forth conclusions as to whether the campus is in compliance with the Minimum Standards of Governance. The Governance Committee may call for revision of the report prior to its release.

 

The Governance Committee sends the revised text to the principal parties for their corrections and comments. The responses are taken into account in preparing the final text for presentation to the Assembly. If it deems that the campus is neither compliant nor working to achieve compliance, the Governance Committee may seek the good offices of the Office of the President in achieving a resolution. Finally, if all efforts fail, the Governance Committee may recommend that the Faculty Assembly censure the noncompliant administration. The Assembly continues to seek compliance, upon the attainment of which, the Governance Committee recommends to the Assembly that the censure be removed.

 


 

Faculty Senate Agenda

February 22, 2005

Attachment 2.

            UNFINISHED BUSINESS

        ACADEMIC STANDARDS COMMITTEE REPORT

Proposed Revised Goals of the Liberal Arts Foundations Curriculum

 

The overarching goal of the Liberal Arts Foundations Curriculum is to provide students with the fundamental knowledge and abilities essential to their living worthwhile lives both private and public. The curriculum is based on the faculty’s belief that the best way to prepare students for living worthwhile lives is to provide them with a solid foundation in the core disciplines in the Liberal Arts (the Humanities, Arts, Basic Sciences, and Basic Social-Sciences), in conjunction with a multi-disciplinary education in the specific areas of health promotion and physical activity and mastery of writing and mathematics competencies. The core disciplines in the Liberal Arts seek knowledge for its own sake as well as for its application. Multi-disciplinary scholarship in health promotion and physical activity is essential to promoting health and physical well-being. Together these disciplines provide the core knowledge base in which all other scholarship is grounded, including applied disciplinary, multi-disciplinary and interdisciplinary scholarship. The foundations curriculum thus provides a common, unified knowledge and skills base to a body of students who will major in widely different subjects and who come from diverse cultural backgrounds. Foundations courses give members of ECU’s diverse student body the shared knowledge and abilities necessary to integrate their foundational education with their specialized, professional education. Taken from the perspective of the students’ personal, private interests, this foundation and its integration with specialized learning in the students’ majors enables students to live broadly informed, responsible, worthwhile lives. From the public perspective, this integration is essential to good citizenship in an increasingly global yet culturally diverse and conflicted world. 

 

Background

East Carolina University's program of general education is mandated by the Board of Governors' mission statement, Strategic Directions statement, and Strategies statement for the University of North Carolina, and by the Board of Governors' mission statement for East Carolina University. The sections of The General Mission of the University of North Carolina (Long-Range Planning: The University of North Carolina Board of Governors, adopted November 13, 1992) directly addressing general education are reproduced below:

 1 ) UNC Statement of Mission  ...to discover, create, transmit, and apply knowledge to address the needs of individuals and society. This mission is accomplished through instruction, which communicates the knowledge and values and imparts the skills necessary for individuals to lead responsible, productive, and personally satisfying lives. (p.19) I. Instruction: Through instruction, an institution communicates existing knowledge and values and imparts skills to successive generations of students. Instruction includes all of those teaching and related scholarly activities that define the primary purpose of each of the constituent institutions of the University of North Carolina. . . The basic contributions of colleges and universities to the state and to the nation are made through students by their individual contributions through life as citizens. Through instruction in the basic arts and sciences, social sciences, fine arts, and abroad range of professional disciplines, the University prepares students to lead rewarding lives and to function effectively in the work force and as responsible members of society. Thus, teaching and learning constitute the primary service the University renders to society. (p. 20)

2) UNC Strategic Directions : IV. B. Improve the quality of undergraduate education.  One of the basic objectives assigned to the Board of Governors by statute is to improve the quality of education. . .  Educational quality is also determined by the breadth and coherence of the general education, or core curriculum, and by the quality of the programs that constitute academic majors. 

3) UNC Strategies : Strengthen undergraduate degree programs. Urge institutions to establish goals for their general education or core curricula and to review these curricula periodically to ensure their breadth, coherence, and importance to the overall undergraduate degree program.

4) General Statement of Educational Mission. East Carolina University: (Long-Range Planning: The University of North Carolina Board of Governors, adopted November 13,1992, p. 52): ...The fundamental educational goal of the university is to provide students with a substantive general education and to enable students and other constituents to secure specialized and multidisciplinary knowledge.

 

Fundamental Goals

The Foundations Curriculum is divided into four basic, core disciplinary areas (Humanities, Arts, Basic Sciences, Basic Social Sciences), one multi-disciplinary area in Health Promotion and Physical Activity, and two areas of competence: writing and mathematics. The fundamental objectives of the courses in each area of the Foundations curriculum are presented as both the fundamental knowledge and the basic skills a course must address in order for it to fulfill a Foundations requirement in a specific area. Disciplines represented at East Carolina University whose primary educational and research mission is to contribute to the broad base of fundamental scientific knowledge and that also may contribute to the development of new applications and technologies are identified as basic sciences or social sciences. Basic science and social science underpins all applied science, social science and technology.

 

All foundations courses in the core Liberal Arts disciplines must meet the three fundamental goals of a foundational Liberal Arts education:

 

Students must learn the subject matter of one or more of the disciplines in each of the four core areas (Humanities, Arts, Basic Sciences, basic Social Sciences).

 

Students must learn the fundamental concepts and research methods utilized in one or more of the disciplines in each core area.

 

Students must learn the relevance of scholarship in the discipline and in its core area to the student’s overall education.

 

All courses in the required multi-disciplinary area (Health Promotion and Physical Activity) and competency areas (writing and mathematics) must meet the goals specific to each of these areas stated in the appropriate section below.

 

Foundations Curriculum Goals for the Humanities

 

Core disciplines in the Humanities –Classical Studies, English, Foreign Languages and Literatures, Philosophy and Religious Studies, critically examine our diverse, fundamental beliefs about humanity. These disciplines seek knowledge for its own sake as well as for its application. In doing this, they provide the knowledge base necessary to problem-solving applications in other scholarly fields. Scholarship in these disciplines addresses the humanistic dimensions of culture, engaging and seeking answers to ultimate questions about human existence. Where appropriate to their research methodology, these disciplines focus on value, especially as regards the aesthetic, ethical and moral dimensions of public and private life. Scholarly study in the humanities promotes the understanding and intellectual abilities essential for living a worthwhile life and provides a basis for developing the knowledge and skills required for broadly informed, ethical, interdisciplinary and professional specialization.

 

Courses earning Humanities credit must address the following goals:

 

Goal 1. Students will learn the subject matter of at least one discipline in the humanities

Rationale: Disciplines in the humanities value knowledge for its own sake. Understanding scholarship in the humanities is essential to appreciating the importance of the humanities to all aspects of human existence, to scholarly reflection on the meaning and value of human existence and to achieving a full appreciation of life’s aesthetic, ethical and moral dimensions. This knowledge is an essential part of the basic foundation necessary for sound, ethical interdisciplinary scholarship and broadly informed, ethical professional specialization.

 

Goal 2. Students will learn the research methodology applied by disciplines in the humanities. Students will learnthe principles and concepts required to understand and conduct undergraduate-level research in the discipline, how identify a problem in the discipline, how to collect, organize and analyze the information necessary to solve the problem and how to present the results of these activities in a research paper.

Rationale: Learning how to do research in a basic discipline in the humanities develops the ability to discover, evaluate, and communicate knowledge. This ability is essential to realizing a broadly informed, lifelong commitment to learning.

 

Goal 3. Students will learn about the discipline’s contribution to general knowledge. Students will learn how the discipline relates to other academic disciplines and to the non-academic world and teaching students the discipline’s impact on our culture and on other cultures.

 

Rationale: In order to develop a unified, comprehensive world-view and to understand and be able to contribute to interdisciplinary scholarship, students must understand the contribution to general knowledge of at least one discipline in the humanities, how disciplines in the humanities relate to one another, to other disciplines, and to the non-academic world and must understand specific examples of the impact of this knowledge on their own and on other cultures.

 

Foundations Curriculum Goals for the Arts

 

Core disciplines in the Arts – visual art, dance, theatre, music, and speech create, utilize and critique works of visual and performing art. They engage in the scholarly study of the history and appreciation of the Arts as well of their creation. These disciplines seek to create art for art’s sake for as well as for its social, political and other applications. Creative activity and scholarly study in the Arts promotes the artistic talents and intellectual abilities that contribute to the general well-being of humanity and that enhance the quality of each individual’s life-experience. The Arts are integral to daily life.  Personal, social, economic and cultural environments are shaped by the Arts. Scholarly study in the Arts provides a basis for developing the knowledge and skills required for both creating artistic expression and for appreciating the value of artistic expression in all its diverse forms.

 

Courses earning Arts credit must address the following goals:

 

Goal 1. Students will learn the subject matter, the practice, the history, or the appreciation of the subject matter of at least one art form. Students will learn the basic principles and practice in one or more areas of the Arts. They will gain an understanding and develop an informed appreciation of the importance of the Arts to areas of human activity and to life in general.

Rational: Learning either the subject matter, the practice, the history, or the appreciation of the subject matter of at least one art form develops the ability to discover, evaluate, and communicate knowledge of the Arts. This ability is essential to enhancing both the personal and the public quality of human life.

 

Goal 2. Students will learn the creative methods and skills utilized by one or more disciplines in the Arts, or they will learn the research methods used in scholarship addressing the history or appreciation of at least one of the Arts. Students will learn how to identify and critique (i.e., “appreciate” in an informed, scholarly way) the creative persons, processes and products of at least one Arts discipline.

Rational: Learning how to engage in creative activity in or scholarship in the Arts develops the ability to discover, evaluate, and communicate knowledge of the Arts. This ability is essential to enhancing both the personal and the public quality of human life.

 

Goal 3. Students will learn about the Arts’ contribution to society, to culture and to life in general. Students will learn how the Arts relate to other academic areas and to the non-academic world. 

Rational: In order to develop a unified, comprehensive world-view and to be able to contribute to interdisciplinary scholarship, students must appreciate the value and role of the Arts as they impact on both the academic and non-academic dimensions of life, on our culture and on other cultures.

 

Foundations Curriculum Goals for the Basic Sciences

 

Core disciplines in the Basic Sciences currently represented at East Carolina University are physics, chemistry, biology, and geology. These disciplines seek answers to fundamental questions about the structure and function of the natural world. These disciplines seek knowledge for its own sake as well as for its application. In doing this, they provide the knowledge base necessary to use in problem-solving applications in other scholarly fields. The natural world is organized on a series of levels, each of which has unique properties that supervene on the properties of the next lowest level. Scholarly study of the Basic Sciences promotes the intellectual abilities essential for an understanding of these complex systems. The study of the Basic Sciences promotes understanding of the scientific method and helps people to create and to understand the technological advances upon which society depends. Successful interdisciplinary scholarship in the sciences is grounded on knowledge of the Basic Sciences. A sound foundation in the Basic Sciences is essential to developing the knowledge and skills required for broadly informed, ethical, interdisciplinary and professional specialization.

 

Courses earning Science credit must address the following goals:

 

Goal 1. Students will learn the subject matter of at least one core discipline in the Basic Sciences.  Students will learn the properties and processes of one or more basic component of the natural world. 

 

Rationale: Scholarly study in the basic sciences promotes the intellectual abilities essential for an understanding of the complexly interrelated systems of physics, chemistry, biology, and geology. It promotes understanding of the scientific method – one of the primary ways of knowing, allowing one to distinguish reality from speculation.  It helps students understand the technological advances upon which society depends and provides a basis for developing the knowledge and skills required for broadly informed, interdisciplinary, and professional specialization.

 

Goal 2. Students will learn the research methodology, principles and concepts required to understand and conduct undergraduate-level research in a basic science.  Students will learn how to identify a problem in the science, how to formulate questions and hypotheses, how to design experiments that isolate variables, how to collect and record data, how to interpret data and make correlations, how to draw conclusions, and how to present the results of these activities in a research paper.  It involves laboratory study, which is important for understanding how science is done, how experiments are carried out, and generally how scientists manipulate the world.  

       Rationale: This learning develops the ability to reason logically, and to observe and manipulate the physical world. 

 

Goal 3. Students will learn about the discipline’s contribution to general knowledge. Students will learn that the Basic Sciences are connected and interdependent, how the Basic Sciences relate to other academic disciplines and to the non-academic world, and the impact of basic science on our culture and on other cultures. 

Rationale: Basic Science never stands apart from the social and cultural context in which it is practiced.  It both conditions and is conditioned by society and culture.  It is not the only path to knowledge, but is the one that deals specifically with questions about the physical structure and function of the world. Understanding the Basic Sciences is necessary to understanding the interplay of Basic Science, politics and social policy as well as the crucial interplay among Basic Science and technology, the social order and political decisions.

 

Foundations Curriculum Goals for the Basic Social Sciences

 

Core disciplines in the Basic Social Sciences represented at East Carolina University are anthropology, communication, economics, geography, history, political science, psychology, and sociology. These core disciplines study the past and present activities of individuals, groups, and cultures. These disciplines seek knowledge for its own sake as well as for its application. In doing this, they provide the knowledge base necessary to problem-solving applications in other scholarly fields. Each discipline utilizes theoretical, analytical, and methodological techniques and perspectives in order to understand individual and group behavior. Scholarly study in the Basic Social Sciences provides a foundation for understanding real-world problems, including the underlying origins of such problems Achieving this understanding is necessary for meaningful participation in society. Scholarly study in the Basic Social Sciences promotes the understanding and intellectual abilities essential for life in general and provides a basis for developing the knowledge and skills required for broadly informed, ethical, interdisciplinary and professional specialization.

 

Courses earning Basic Social Science credit must address the following goals:

 

Goal 1. Students will learn the subject matter of at least one discipline in the Basic Social Sciences.

Rationale: Scholarly study in the social sciences promotes the intellectual abilities essential for an understanding of the interrelationships of individuals, group and culture. It provides for a practical understanding of why the field exists, what its driving issues are, and how scholars in the field pursue those issues.

 

Goal 2. Students will learn the research methodology, principles and concepts required to understand and conduct undergraduate-level research in a Basic Social Science. Students will learn how identify a problem in the discipline, how to formulate questions and hypotheses, understand the variety of research designs to collect data, how to interpret data and make inferences from data, how to draw conclusions, and how to present the results of these activities in a research paper. 

Rationale: Such learning develops the ability to observe social phenomena, think and reason in a consistent fashion, and understand how to differentiate between scientific (broadly defined) and pseudoscientific understandings of individual, group and cultural processes.  It is essential to the ability to compare methods of inquiry in one field to those in another and to recognize strengths of the methods used in the social sciences for understanding social phenomena.

 

Goal 3. Students will learn about the discipline’s contribution to general knowledge.

Rationale: In order to develop a unified, comprehensive world-view and to understand and be able to contribute to interdisciplinary scholarship, students must understand the contribution to general knowledge of at least one discipline in the social sciences, how disciplines in the basic social sciences relate to one another, to other disciplines, and to the non-academic world and must understand specific examples of the impact of this knowledge on their own and on other cultures.

 

Foundations Curriculum Goals for the Health Promotion and Physical Activity Disciplines

The health promotion and physical activity disciplines enable students to develop the knowledge and skills required for the physically fit and healthy functioning human body. These closely related disciplines create and critically examine scholarship addressing health and physical activity. Scholarly study in the health promotion and physical activity disciplines promotes the understanding and intellectual abilities essential to making informed decisions about how to lead a healthy, physically active and fit life. Proficiency in engaging in life-enhancing group and individual physical activity is essential to living a healthy, high-quality life. Scholarship in these areas address behaviors and develop skills that have a positive impact on overall human wellbeing.

Goal 1. Students will develop an understanding of the physical, psychological, and socio-cultural factors and human behaviors that influence human health and affect the major health problems in our society.

Rationale: The physical, psychological, and socio-cultural dimensions of health are interrelated.  To make informed decisions about how to lead healthy, productive lives, students must have an understanding of these dimensions of health, and recognize behaviors and develop skills that will have a positive impact on their well-being and the health of society.

Goal 2. Students will develop an understanding of the role of knowledge and personal responsibility in fostering a commitment to human health.

Rationale: Acquiring health knowledge and skills enables students to make informed personal health decisions and thereby positively impact the health of the individual and society.

Goal 3. Students will develop an understanding of the components of health-related physical activity and their relationship to human health.

Rationale: Knowledge of the components of health-related physical activities is essential to changing physical activity habits toward more healthful behaviors.  The Surgeon General has recognized the centrality of physical activity to maintaining human health.  As such, increasing the physical activity of our citizens is a priority National objective.

Goal 4. Students will develop or enhance physical fitness and lifelong sport skills.

Rationale: Individuals who possess physical activity or sport skills are more likely to remain physically active in later life, and thereby will continue to experience the healthful benefits of an active lifestyle.

 

Foundations Curriculum Goals for Writing and Mathematics Competencies

 

Writing Competence

 

The writing competence curriculum focuses on student aptitudes rather than on a particular content because composing is a recursive process that depends not on specific knowledge but on fluent, flexible, creative thinking.  To concentrate on the essentials of composing, the program explicitly treats stages of process such as discovery, drafting, etc. It concentrates on exposition and argument as the modes most useful for the student and the citizen.  It teaches students how to use library resources so that students may expand their access to knowledge essential for informed discourse.  The program emphasizes critical thinking as well as traditional rhetorical skills because only insight can generate substance for the writer’s craft to shape.

 

Courses earning writing credit must address the following goals:

 

Goal 1. Students will learn to use various heuristic and planning tactics in preparing a written composition.  In drafting and revising, they will learn to choose words carefully, exploit English syntax fully, and ensure coherence.  They will learn to edit for standard written English usage, punctuation, and spelling.  They will also become competent in using the computer to perform those processes.

Rationale:  The ability to engage in the writing process—discovering subjects, exploring subjects; and drafting, revising, and editing manuscripts—is an aptitude fundamental to academic achievement and to a full civic life.

 

Goal 2.  Students will improve their reading skills in order to understand literally, to infer, to recognize ideological bias, and to evaluate.  They will deepen their sensitivities to connections and differences among texts.  They will increase their capacities for reflecting on experience and analyzing and solving problems creatively.

Rationale:  The ability to engage in reading and thinking critically is an aptitude fundamental to academic achievement and to a full civic life.

 

Goal 3.  Students will learn the aims and means of the expositor and the advocate and will learn to write in order to inform and to persuade.

Rationale:  The ability to write clear and expository and argumentative compositions is an aptitude fundamental to academic achievement and to a full civic life.

 

Goal 4. Students will learn to formulate research questions, identify and search both print and electronic bibliographic indexes, locate resources in the library, and read widely for selected kinds of information.  They will learn to incorporate information gained from the library and other sources into their compositions, citing documents appropriately.

Rationale:  The ability to conduct bibliographic research and to use library resources effectively in written compositions is an aptitude fundamental to academic achievement and to a full civic life.

 

Mathematics Competence

 

The mathematics competence curriculum provides students with basic skills in mathematics or logic.

 

Courses earning mathematics credit must address the following goals:

 

Goal 1. Students will learn Mathematics that is appropriate to their background and educational needs.

Rationale: Mathematics is an important intellectual activity that trains students in logic and deductive reasoning, which are important in analyzing and solving problems in all disciplines.

 

Goal 2: Students will learn to use mathematical or logical techniques and procedures in problem-solving activities.

Rationale: Developing students’ problem-solving skills in the area of mathematics most appropriate to their major course of study will empower students with knowledge to succeed in their technological and quantitative studies.

 

Goal 3.  Students will develop the ability to recognize and use the words and symbols of mathematics or formal logic.

Rationale: This is a technological and scientific age, and mathematics is the language of technology and science.  It is very important for students to be comfortable with dealing with issues in their discipline, and in everyday life, which are most commonly expressed in mathematical terms.

 


 

Faculty Senate Agenda

February 22, 2005

Attachment  3.   

 

UNFINISHED BUSINESS

Graduation with Distinction

 

Whereas,       A student has come to me to discuss the current graduation requirements related to degrees with distinction policy; and

 

Whereas,       The student expressed her displeasure with the counting of courses transferred to ECU in the final gpa calculation; and

 

Whereas,       Two students met with the Admission and Retention Policies Committee in the Fall to request special allowances in order to graduate with distinction; and

 

Whereas,       Both students’ requests were denied by the Committee.

 

Therefore be it resolved, that the Faculty Senate charges the Admission and Retention Policies Committee to review the current policy on graduation with distinction found in the Undergraduate Catalog, Section 4. Academic Advisement, Progression, and Support.

 

Be it further resolved, that when the Committee meets to discuss this policy, the meeting date is publicized via Announce and students and faculty are invited to speak with the committee on specific situations.

 

Be it further resolved, that concerns of the University community are heard before a final report is presented to the Faculty Senate in April 2005. 

 

 

Faculty Senate Agenda

February 22, 2005

Attachment  4.   

 

 

COMMITTEE ON COMMITTEES REPORT

First Reading of a Proposed Addition to the Charges of all Faculty Senate Academic Committees

 

 

Add to all of the charges of the Faculty Senate Academic Committees the following additional responsibility:

 

“The Committee reviews at least annually those sections within the University Undergraduate Catalog that correspond to the Committee’s charge and recommend changes as necessary.”

 

 


Faculty Senate Agenda

February 22, 2005

Attachment  5.   

 

COMMITTEE ON COMMITTEES

First Reading of the Academic University Athletics Committee Charge

 

1.         Name:     University Athletics Committee

 

2.         Membership: 

8 faculty members and 1 student member.  5 elected by the Faculty Senate, 3 appointed by the Chancellor, and 1 student appointed by the Student Government Association.

 

Ex-officio members (with vote): The Chair of the Faculty, NCAA Faculty Athletics Representative, President of the Alumni Association, and President of the Pirate Club or their alternates.

 

Ex-officio member (without vote but with all other parliamentary privileges): Chancellor, Provost/Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs, Director of Athletics, Assistant Director of Athletics for Student Development, Director of Compliance, Chair of the University Academic Standards Committee; or their designees, the President of the Student Government Association, and the President of the Student Athlete Advisory Council.

 

3.         Quorum: 5 elected members exclusive of ex-officio.

 

4.         Committee Functions:

A.   The Committee is concerned with issues pertaining to intercollegiate athletics at East Carolina University.

B.      The Committee’s primary functions are oversight responsibility in the area of academic integrity, compliance with NCAA rules and regulations, and the overall development of student athletes.

C.      The Committee is also concerned with general issues such as budget, conference matters, fund-raising, and public relations are inclusive in the charge, but not restricted to those cited.

D.      The Academic Integrity Subcommittee, composed of the faculty members on the committee, will report on the academic quality of the athletic program.

 

5.         To Whom the Committee Reports:

A.      The Committee makes recommendations concerning the implementation and administration of policies and procedures pertaining to intercollegiate athletics at East Carolina University to the Chancellor. 

B.      The Committee reports to the Faculty Senate concerning its recommendations to the Chancellor and/or requests it has received from the Chancellor. 

C.      The Committee makes recommendations concerning academic policies that impact the academic integrity of the athletic programs to the Faculty Senate.

D.      The Academic Integrity Subcommittee will report its evaluations of the academic integrity of the athletic programs to the Chancellor and to the Faculty Senate.

 

6.         How Often the Committee Reports:

The Committee reports to the Faculty Senate at least once a year and other times as necessary. The Academic Integrity Subcommittee will report to the Chancellor and to the Faculty Senate each spring.

 

7.         Power of the Committee to Act Without Faculty Senate Approval:

The Committee makes recommendations concerning the implementation and administration of policies and procedures regarding academic oversight to the Chancellor. The Committee makes recommendations concerning academic policies and procedures that impact the academic quality of the athletic program to the Faculty Senate.

 

8.         Standard Meeting Time:

            The committee does not have a standard meeting time.


 

 

Faculty Senate Agenda

February 22, 2005

Attachment  6.   

 

fACULTY GOVERNANCE COMMITTEE

Interpretation to the ECU Faculty Manual, Appendix L. ECU Code

 

An interpretation is needed in Section D. Code Unit Changes of the ECU Faculty Manual, Appendix L to guide units wanting to move an ”uncoded” department or disciplinary group from a coded unit to another coded unit.  Section D.1.f. references “renaming a code unit, in addition, changes in unit nomenclature shall be approved by UNC General Administration before such changes become effective.”

 

Therefore, we provide the following interpretation to Section D.1.f. of Appendix L. for your consideration.

 

“Changes in unit nomenclature” referenced in Appendix L., Section D.1.f. include moving groups of faculty and/or disciplines from one coded unit to another. This type of move does not require UNC General Administration approval.”

 

 

 

Faculty Senate Agenda

February 22, 2005

Attachment  7.   

 

fACULTY GOVERNANCE COMMITTEE

Proposed Revision to the ECU Faculty Manual, Appendix L. ECU Code

(Additions are noted in bold print and deletions are noted in strikethrough)

 

Proposed revision to Appendix L, Section C as follows:

 

3. To provide consistency unit codes should be developed following an approved outline that includes at least:

a. a preamble

b. definitions of the unit's faculty, its voting faculty, its graduate faculty

c. the administrative organization of the unit

d. the membership, terms, and duties of standing committees

e. a section that states regulations, criteria, and weights governing the evaluation of faculty members annually and otherwise for all personnel actions, including recommendations for merit awards, reappointment, promotion, and the award of permanent tenure (ECU Faculty Manual, Appendices C and D).

f. procedures for meetings within the unit

g. procedures for the unit's faculty members to indicate in a timely fashion and by vote their approval or disapproval of the unit's major planning documents, assessment documents, and other major reports prior to their submission in

final form to person(s) outside the unit (Faculty Senate Resolution #03-37, October 2003)

h. procedures for discussing with its unit administrator the unit's annual budget request and annual report

i. procedures for developing criteria for salary increases

j. i. amendment procedures.

 

 

 

Faculty Senate Agenda

February 22, 2005

Attachment  8.   

 

fACULTY GOVERNANCE COMMITTEE

Proposed Revision to the ECU Faculty Manual, Appendix C. Personnel Policies and Procedures for the Faculty of East Carolina University

(Additions are noted in bold print and deletions are noted in strikethrough)

 

Proposed revision to Appendix C, Section I.D as follows:

 

Among the many qualifications which may be considered when making appointments, the following are essential:

 

Instructor - Evidence of character traits which contribute decidedly to the professional advancement of the well-trained person;   Evidence of a sound educational background for the specific position, including sufficient progress toward a terminal degree that the degree will be obtained within a short period of time as agreed upon by the academic unit and the appointing officer; and evidence of teaching capacity.

 

 

 

Faculty Senate Agenda

February 22, 2005

Attachment  9.   

 

fACULTY GOVERNANCE COMMITTEE

First Reading of Proposed Revisions to the ECU Faculty Manual,
Appendix A. Faculty Constitution of East Carolina University

(Additions are noted in bold print and deletions are noted in strikethrough)

 

I.  Purpose

The purpose of the faculty organization shall be to provide the means by which the faculty is enabled to fulfill its function with respect to academic and educational policies and other affairs of East Carolina University.  The faculty organization shall be comprised of the general faculty and the Faculty Senate.  The general faculty shall be the general electorate, and the Faculty Senate shall be a legislative and advisory body representing the general faculty and shall consist of elected and ex-officio members.  The functions, duties, and privileges of these two bodies, stipulated in the following document, shall be exercised under the authority of the Chancellor of East Carolina University.

 

The Faculty Senate and the various committees on which the faculty serve shall be the primary media for the essential joint effort of faculty and administration in the government of East Carolina University.  The Chancellor and the Chair of the Faculty shall facilitate communication which will enable continuing and effective faculty participation.

 

ii.  Organization of the General Faculty

The general faculty shall consist of all full-time members of the teaching, research, or administrative staff who hold an academic title, including those on special faculty appointment.  

 

The general faculty shall have as its presiding officer the Chair of the Faculty, who shall be responsible for calling its meetings and for keeping a record of its proceedings.  The presence of a majority of the members shall constitute a quorum, except in special cases provided for in this constitution.  Each member of the general faculty shall have one vote.  A vote by voice will be the regular method of voting on any motion that does not require more than a majority vote for its adoption.  Upon the request of ten percent of those present, a secret ballot will be in order. 

 

III.  Functions of the General Faculty

The general faculty shall be empowered to perform the following functions: consider reports from and make recommendations to the Chancellor, the appropriate vice chancellor, and the Faculty Senate; discuss any matter relating to the welfare of East Carolina University or of the members thereof; amend or rescind the articles establishing the Faculty Senate as provided for in this constitution; amend or rescind the action of the Faculty Senate as provided for in this constitution.

 

IV.  Meetings of the General Faculty

The general faculty shall meet at the pleasure of the Chancellor or the Faculty Senate of East Carolina University or upon petition to the Chancellor by at least fifteen percent of the general faculty.

 

V.  The academic units shall be organized into autonomous code units according to guidelines approved by the Faculty Senate and the Chancellor.  Each code unit shall consist of at least seven faculty members and, except for the academic libraries, be responsible for at least one degree program.

 

VVI.  Organization of the Faculty Senate

Electoral units for the Faculty Senate shall be the academic code units.  All full-time faculty members of East Carolina University are eligible to vote for faculty senators.  All full-time faculty members of East Carolina University in at least their second year of appointment to the electoral unit which they will represent are eligible for election to the Faculty Senate.  The membership of the Faculty Senate shall consist of elected representatives and of ex-officio members.     

 

The number of elected faculty senators shall not exceed 58 nor be fewer than 52.  Prior to the election in the spring February of each academic year, the ratio of faculty members to elected faculty senators will be determined by the Chair of the Faculty, Vice Chair of the Faculty, and the Secretary of the Faculty.  The number of faculty within each department/school/college will be gathered from part of a personnel data file that is prepared and submitted to the UNC General Administration by the Office of Institutional Planning, Research, and Effectiveness Department of Planning and Institutional Research in November January of each year. 

 

Faculty members included in the University's annual personnel data report who satisfy all of the following criteria shall be counted in determining the number of each electoral unit's faculty senators: (1) currently employed (as of the date of the report), (2)  permanent employee (including those on leave with or without pay), (3) EPA employee, (4) full time employee, (5) included in the occupational activity categories of 10 (executive, administrative and managerial) or 20 (instructional faculty), (6) holding a professorial rank or title (modified or unmodified) of instructor, assistant professor, associate professor, or professor.  Faculty members meeting these criteria will be counted as belonging to their department/school/college of rank (not home department) where these two differ.  When a faculty member's department of rank is part of a professional school or college, and the school or college is the recognized electoral unit, the faculty member will, for purposes of Faculty Senate representation, be counted as a member of the school or college which is his or her electoral unit.

 

Each electoral unit represented will then be informed as to the number of elected faculty senators to which that electoral unit is entitled.  No electoral unit will be allocated more than 15 percent of the elected Faculty Senate members.  Electoral units for the purpose of this constitution shall be the various professional schools and colleges, Academic Library Services, Health Sciences Library, and the departments of the College of Arts and Sciences.  In the event that an electoral unit must reduce its existing number of faculty senators, it shall do so by following democratic procedures.          

           

Each department of the College of Arts and Sciences shall have at least one elected faculty senator and will elect its faculty senator as an electoral unit.  The various professional schools and colleges, Academic Library Services, and the Health Sciences Library will have at least one elected Faculty Senator.  Each department/school/college may choose to elect its senators from the department/school/college as a whole or in the alternate manner described as follows. Each department within the school/college shall be allowed to nominate the number (less the number whose terms are not expired) to which it would be entitled if it were considered as a separate electoral unit.  The persons nominated by each department shall be placed on a ballot for the election of the number allotted to the electoral unit by the faculty of the electoral unit.

 

The count of faculty members for the purpose of apportionment shall include those members who are absent from the campus because of illness or leave of absence, unless replaced by a full-time instructor or above under annual contract.

 

The ex-officio members of the Faculty Senate shall include the following representatives of the East Carolina University administration: Chancellor, Provost/Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs, Vice Chancellor for Health Sciences, Vice Chancellor for Research and Graduate School, Economic Development and Community Engagement, and an academic dean elected by the Administrative Council Chancellor’s Cabinet in a manner determined by the Council Cabinet. The immediate past Chair of the Faculty and the elected representatives of East Carolina University to the Faculty Assembly of the University of North Carolina who are not members of the Faculty Senate shall also be ex-officio members.  These ex-officio members shall have a vote in allSenate matters except the election of officers and committee members.

 

VI VII. Method of Election of the Faculty Senate

The Secretary of the Faculty shall request that each electoral unit proceed to elect its representatives.  Elections shall be held in February of each year with members-elect to take office on the day following the last regular meeting of the Faculty Senate in the spring semester.

 

To obtain nominations, each department/school/college or department shall develop a ballot that lists every eligible member of that department/school/college or department. Each member of the faculty shall vote by secret ballot for twice as many nominees as that faculty member's department/school/college or department is entitled to elect.  That group of nominees equal to twice the number of representatives to be elected that receive the largest number of votes shall then be placed on a separate ballot for the election of representatives.  An alternate method of nominating Senators by the schools is found in Section V.

 

To elect representatives each faculty member shall then vote by secret ballot for the number of representatives allotted that electoral unit. Votes shall be counted in accordance with procedures agreed upon by the electoral unit.

 

The administrative officer of each electoral unit shall report the results of the election to the Secretary of the Faculty.

 

Each senator shall serve a two-year term.  Senators may be elected to succeed themselves twice.  After a lapse of one year following the expiration of this third term, they will again be eligible for election.  The seat of an elected senator who fails to attend more than three consecutively held meetings of the Faculty Senate shall be declared vacated by the Chair of the Faculty.

 

Each electoral unit concerned shall hold special elections to fill unexpired or vacated terms.  The Senate may establish and promulgate procedures for selecting alternates for elected and ex-officio members.  The administrative office of each electoral unit so affected shall certify to the Secretary of the Faculty the credentials of individuals thus elected.

 

VII VIII.  Officers of the Faculty and Faculty Senate

[Please refer to interpretation #I93-2 located in the Index of ECU Faculty Manual Interpretations at  http://www.ecu.edu/fsonline/FacultyManual/interpretations.htm.]

 

The officers of the faculty and Faculty Senate shall consist of the following: the Chair of the Faculty, the Vice Chair of the Faculty, and the Secretary of the Faculty.  Other officials may be established as they become advisable or necessary.  All officers shall be elected by a majority vote of the elected members of the Faculty Senate present.   All full-time, permanently tenured faculty are eligible to serve as Chair or Vice Chair of the Faculty.  All full-time faculty members of East Carolina University in at least their second year of appointment are eligible to serve as Secretary of the Faculty.  In the event that a Faculty Officer is also a faculty senator, the electoral unit having elected the Senator is invited to elect a replacement.  Officers of the Faculty, who are not members of the Faculty Senate will not have vote, count toward a quorum, or vote and occupy a seat assigned to a Faculty Senator. The term of faculty officers shall be one year with the privilege of reelection.

 

At the second regular meeting of the spring semester the elected members of the Faculty Senate shall nominate and elect a nominating committee to consist of five members.  The nominating committee shall be elected from the ranks of elected members of the Faculty Senate by a majority of those present and voting.  Voting for members of the nominating committee shall be by written, secret ballot.  The nominating committee elected by the Faculty Senate shall submit to the Secretary of the Faculty a slate of candidates for each office of the Faculty Senate at an organizational meeting to be held on a Tuesday following the last regular meeting of the spring semester but before the beginning of the examination period.

 

Further nominations, from the ranks of the elected membership and by the elected members, will be accepted from the floor.  Officers will be elected by a majority of those present and voting.  They shall assume their duties on August July 1 following election.  If the office of the Chair of the Faculty shall become vacant, the position shall be assumed by the Vice Chair of the Faculty.  If other offices shall become vacant, they shall be filled by a special election conducted by the Faculty Senate.  Voting for all officers shall be by written, secret ballot.

 

VIII IX.  Duties of the Officers of the Faculty Senate

The Chair of the Faculty shall preside at all meetings. He or she is empowered to call special meetings as hereinafter provided.  The Chair is an ex-officio member of all academic committees and various administrative committees.  The Chair may delegate to the Vice Chair or an appointed representative his or her seat on any of the academic or various administrative committees.  He or she shall appoint persons to fill unexpired terms of committees.

 

Before the first regular meeting of the Faculty Senate, the Chair will appoint the Parliamentarian of the Faculty.  The Parliamentarian need not be a member of the Faculty Senate, but shall advise the Chair and the faculty on the parliamentary matters according to the latest edition of Robert's Rules of Order, Newly Revised and the Faculty Constitution and its By-Laws.

 

The Chair of the Faculty supervises the Faculty Senate office personnel, and with their assistance, plans the General Faculty Convocation.  The Chair is responsible for conveying greetings of the Faculty at commencement exercises and representing the Faculty at university functions and Board of Trustee meetings.   For the length of his/her term as Chair, the Chair of the Faculty serves as a Delegate to the Faculty Assembly (but not exceeding six consecutive years), with duties as a delegate described in the Bylaws of the Faculty Assembly of the University of North Carolina, Part X of the ECU Faculty Manual.  Section II.A., Members of the Assembly.

 

The Vice Chair of the Faculty shall perform all of the duties of the Chair in the absence or incapacity of the Chair.  The Vice Chair of the Faculty shall serve, at the request of the Chair of the Faculty, as the Chair's representative on faculty committees.  The Vice Chair of the Faculty shall succeed to the office of Chair of the Faculty in the event that office should become vacant during the term of the incumbent.

 

The Secretary of the Faculty, with assistance of the office personnel, shall keep accurate minutes of all regular and special meetings, ensure distribution of copies of the minutes to all members of the general faculty, keep an accurate list of membership of the Faculty Senate, keep an accurate record of attendance, inform the Chair of the Faculty when a seat becomes vacant, serve, at the request of the Chair of the Faculty, as the Chair's representative on faculty committees, and perform such other appropriate duties as directed by the Faculty Senate.

 

IX X.    Meetings of the Faculty Senate

Four regular meetings of the Faculty Senate will be held each fall and spring semester according to a schedule prepared by the Agenda Committeeand approved by the Senate in the Fall Semester of the preceding year. 

 

The organizational meeting of the Faculty Senate will be held on a Tuesday following the last regular meeting of the spring semester but before the beginning of the examination period.

 

Upon written petition of fifteen members of the Faculty Senate, the Chair shall call a special session of the Faculty Senate within four days.  In an exceptional situation in which the regular procedures for scheduling a meeting of the Faculty Senate are clearly inadequate and would occasion undue delay, the Chair of the Faculty shall be empowered to call a special session of the Faculty Senate.  A notice stating the purpose of the special session shall be distributed to the members of the Faculty Senate and the general faculty twenty-four hours prior to the meeting.

 

Meetings of the Faculty Senate shall be open to all members of the general public in accordance with the North Carolina Open Meetings Law faculty

 

The general faculty shall be informed of the time, place, and agenda of all regular and special meetings.

 

X XI.    Functions of the Faculty Senate

The Faculty Senate may, at its own discretion, seek the advice and counsel of any member of the general faculty.  In exercising its function the Faculty Senate shall establish whatever procedures are necessary.

 

The Faculty Senate shall be authorized to set up such committees as are necessary for the performance of its duties.

 

The legislative powers of the general faculty are delegated to the Faculty Senate and the Faculty Senate shall have the powers of the general faculty, subject to the limitations stated in this constitution, in formulating the policies of East Carolina University.

 

The Faculty Senate shall ratify, amend, or remand all matters of academic policy or faculty welfare which have been recommended by any standing or special committee of East Carolina University, or initiate any policies in such matters which it deems desirable.

 

XI XII.  Agenda of the Faculty Senate

The Faculty Senate shall be free to establish its own agenda, provided that all matters of academic policy brought before the Agenda Committee by action of the general faculty, any senator, or any standing or special committee shall be placed on the agenda not later than the time of the second regular meeting of the Faculty Senate after receipt of the recommendation.

 

Matters to be brought before the Faculty Senate shall ordinarily be considered in the order set forth by the Agenda Committee.  Matters for consideration may be taken out of order and/or new matters considered in any order upon a two-thirds vote of faculty senators present and voting at any meeting of the Faculty Senate.

 

The Agenda Committee, with assistance of the office personnel, collects all recommendations and reports from academic committees, including all standing and ad hoc committees of the Faculty Senate.  The committee draws up the agenda, on the basis of the recommendations and reports received from the committees, as well as from the officers and members of the Faculty Senate, for each regular and special meeting of the Faculty Senate.  The committee has the responsibility of providing each member of the faculty seeing that each member of the faculty receives a copy of the agenda for each meeting of the Faculty Senate one week before the date of the meeting. 

 

The membership of the Agenda Committee shall consist of five elected Senators, elected to the Committee by the Faculty Senate for one-year terms at the organizational meeting of the Faculty Senate each spring semester, plus ex-officio:  Chair and Vice Chair of the Faculty and Secretary of the Faculty.  The immediate past Chair of the Faculty, in residence, the Parliamentarian of the Faculty, and the Faculty Assembly Delegates shall serve as members without vote.  The Chair and Secretary of the Agenda Committee shall be chosen by the members from among its elected membership.  The quorum shall be three elected committee members.

 

The Agenda Committee is empowered to draw up, and arrange for the distribution of, the agenda for each meeting of the Faculty Senate.

           

The Committee reports the agenda directly to the members of the faculty and the Faculty Senate.  

 

The Agenda Committee It also reports to the Faculty Senate on any other matter within its charge requiring Faculty Senate action.

 

XII XIII. Order of Business for the Faculty Senate

The following order of business shall be observed in meetings of the Faculty Senate unless Senators vote to change the procedures as provided in this constitution: (I) call to order, (II) approval of the minutes, (III) special order of the day, (IV) unfinished business, (V) reports of committees, (VI) new business.

 

Each elected member of the Faculty Senate shall have one vote. Unless otherwise indicated, the ex-officio members shall have one vote each. Voting by the Faculty Senate shall ordinarily be by voice vote.  All matters shall be decided by a majority vote of those Senators present and voting except as stated in this constitution.          

 

A quorum shall consist of three-fifths of the elected faculty members of the Faculty Senate.

 

XIII XIV.  Limitations Upon Functions of the Faculty Senate

The general faculty shall be empowered to amend or rescind any act of the Faculty Senate, provided that a majority of the total membership of the general faculty at a regular or special meeting at which a quorum of at least two-thirds of the general faculty vote. shall be present and voting, so votes.

 

Acts or decisions of the Faculty Senate shall be considered approved unless vetoed within thirty days of the action by the Chancellor of East Carolina University by written notice to the Chair of the Faculty or unless the Chancellor notifies the Chair of the Faculty in writing that the proposal has been forwarded to the Board of Trustees or to the Board of Governors.

 

XIV XV.  Amendments to the Faculty Constitution

All proposed amendments to the Faculty Constitution shall be presented first at a regular meeting of the Faculty Senate for discussion, amendment or substitution.  At the next regular meeting of the Faculty Senate the amendment will be voted upon for submission to the general faculty for approval.

 

An amendment to the Faculty Constitution shall be effected only by action of the general faculty.

 

As the creating body, the general faculty shall be empowered to amend or abolish these articles establishing the Faculty Senate.  Any amendment to these articles or any action abolishing them shall require a vote of two-thirds of those present and voting at the annual Fall Faculty Convocation. a majority of the total membership of the general faculty, at a regular or special meeting at which a quorum of at least two-thirds of the general faculty shall be present and voting.

 

XV XVI.  Adoption and Changing of By-Laws of the Faculty Constitution

The Faculty Senate shall establish whatever by-laws are necessary.  A motion to amend the by-laws shall be presented first at a regular meeting of the Faculty Senate for discussion only.  At the next regular meeting of the Faculty Senate the motion to amend the by-laws will be acted upon, requiring a vote of two thirds of those elected senators present and voting for approval.  An amendment to the By-Laws of the Faculty Constitution shall be effected only by action of the Faculty Senate.

 

 

Approved:      Faculty Senate Resolution #94-40

                        22 August 1995

                        East Carolina University Chancellor

 

Amended:      Faculty Senate Resolution #97-13, March 1997

                        Interpretation made to Section VII. (3-30-93)

 

 

 

Faculty Senate Agenda

February 22, 2005

Attachment  10.   

 

fACULTY GOVERNANCE COMMITTEE

First Reading of Proposed Revisions to the ECU Faculty Manual,
Appendix A. By-Laws of the Faculty Constitution

 (Additions are noted in bold print and deletions are noted in strikethrough)

 

I.    Attendance, Seating, and Participation

A.  To facilitate the efficient flow of business, Senators shall be seated as follows:

1.         Ex-officio members shall be assigned seats on the first one row.

2.   Elected members shall be assigned seats in alphabetical order by electoral units school or department

B.  Only elected and ex-officio members (including alternates, if representing their electoral units) may answer the roll call, vote, or occupy seats assigned to senators.

C.  Faculty members visiting the Senate shall seat themselves in the back of the meeting room, behind the seats assigned to Senate members.

D.  Visitors may not participate in Senate discussions and business except by advance invitation of the Senate Agenda Committee or the Chair of the Faculty.  Such an invitation will be announced to the Senators prior to the meeting.

E.  Each electoral unit of the University may elect a number of alternate representatives equal to its allotment of senators, not to exceed the electoral unit’s number of apportioned senators.  If more than one alternate is elected, they should be elected to two-year staggered terms.  The alternate(s) will be elected in the same manner as faculty senators at the time of regular election of senators, and will serve for a two-year term.

 

Alternates shall be eligible for re-election.  The alternate will represent that electoral unit at the discretion of any Senator within the electoral unit, and in such a situation, shall notify the Secretary of the Faculty or Faculty Senate office in writing that he or she is representing that electoral unit prior to the convening of the Senate session in question.

           

II.  Minutes of the Faculty Senate

A.  There shall be a Faculty Senate Committee on Minutes composed of the Chair of the Faculty, Vice Chair of the Faculty, and Secretary of the Faculty.

B.  Minutes shall become official on approval by the Faculty Senate Committee on Minutes.  The official minutes, or an abbreviated version thereof, shall be mailed distributed to all faculty as soon as possible after a Senate meeting.  Any corrections to the minutes by the Senate shall be made a part of the official minutes of the subsequent meeting.

C.  Incorporation into the official minutes of verbatim remarks shall be allowed or disallowed at the discretion of the Chair of the Faculty Faculty Senate Committee on Minutes.  The Chair of the Faculty may request that these verbatim remarks be submitted in writing to the Secretary of the Faculty.

 

III.  Special Committees

A.  Special committees shall be established by the Senate at the discretion of the Chair of the Faculty, in consultation with the Faculty Officers.

B.  Members of the special committees may be appointed by the Chair of the Faculty or he or she may ask the Senate to elect committee members.  At least one senator shall be on each special committee.

      C.  The Chair of the Faculty may appoint the chair of special committees or these chairs may be elected by the committee members.

D.  Non-Senate faculty members as well as Senators may serve on special committees.  At least one senator shall be on each committee.

E.  Appellate Committee members, excluding the Faculty Grievance Committee, must be permanently tenured, voting faculty holding no administrative title (Appendix D, Tenure and Promotion Policies and Procedures of ECU).

F.   The process for election of Appellate Committees (Appendix D, Tenure and Promotion Policies and Procedures of ECU) will be as follows:

1.   The Appellate Committee preference form will be distributed to all faculty, by the Committee on Committees with assistance of the office personnel (via the Faculty Senate office), in January.  The completed preference form is due in the Faculty Senate office in February.

2.   The Committee on Committees will review all preference forms and present to the Faculty Senate a slate of one or more nominees as there are vacancies to fill.  Nominations may also be made from the Faculty Senate floor.  Appellate Committee members will be elected at the Faculty Senate Organizational meeting in April.  Election will be by majority present and voting.

3.   This by-law may be suspended in accordance with procedures specified in Robert's Rules of Order, Newly Revised.

4.   Members of the Faculty Governance Committee can not be elected concurrently to an appellate committee.

 

IV.  Faculty Senate, Academic and Administrative Committees, Membership, and Structure

Membership

Membership of Faculty Senate Committees and Academic Committees shall consist of faculty holding academic rank (instructor, assistant professor, associate professor and professor).  The Chancellor and the Chair of the Faculty are ex-officio members of all committees. 

 

Members of committees serve in accordance with their ability, training, and experience rather than as representatives of their electoral unit. several departments or schools.

 

The process for election of academic and selective administrative committees will be as follows:

1.   The Academic and Administrative Committee preference forms will be distributed to all faculty, by the Committee on Committees with assistance of the office personnel (via the Faculty Senate office), in January.  The completed forms are due in the Faculty Senate office in February.

2.   The Committee on Committees will review all preference forms and present to the Faculty Senate a slate of one or more nominees as there are vacancies to fill.  Nominations may also be made from the floor of the Faculty Senate.  Election of Academic and Administrative Committee members will take place at the Faculty Senate Organizational Meeting in April.  Election will be by majority present and voting. 

 

Members are elected to staggered three-year terms, which may extend to the beginning of the fall semester; faculty members are generally not elected to more than one academic committee.  Service on a single academic or administrative committee is limited to election to two consecutive 3-year terms with ineligibility for election to the same committee for at least one year.  Student members are nominated by the Student Government Association for appointment by the Chancellor.

 

Faculty Senate and Academic Committees meet on a standard schedule, set and revised by the Committee on Committees. When a Faculty Senate academic committee deals with matters which directly concern any administrator administrative official, these matters should be discussed with the person administrator during the development of a proposed policy.  Further, the official administrator should have adequate input before the finished resolution is presented to the Senate.  This not only would involve ex-officio committee members but also would involve working with any administrator involved in a particular policy under consideration.

 

All University Academic Committees are Standing Committees of the Faculty Senate.  The official list of committee membership shall be distributed by the Faculty Senate office in the fall of each year.  Information relating to each committee is available in the Faculty Senate office and electronically on the Faculty Senate web site.

 

Officers:    Officers of each committee are elected from the membership of the committee, excluding ex-officio, by the members of the committee, for a term of one year. Previous service as a committee officer shall not prejudice a member's election to any committee office. Under normal circumstances each committee shall have a chairperson, a vice chairperson, and a secretary.  Upon organization of the new committees, at the Committees' Organizational meetings beginning in the Fall, the former chairperson if available will turn over committee records to the new chairperson.  A committee chair The Chair of the Faculty may declare an elected member's seat vacant upon the occurrence of three consecutive absences of that member.   The Chair of the Faculty will appoint faculty members to fill vacancies of any University Academic Committee that may occur during the academic year.  Interim elections may be held to fill an office that has become vacant or to replace an officer that two-thirds of the full committee membership deems is not fulfilling the obligations of the office.     

 

The charge of each Faculty Senate and academic committee is on file in the Faculty Senate office and available electronically on the Faculty Senate web site (www.ecu.edu/fsonline). Many administrative committee charges are available on the East Carolina University web site. on file in the Chancellor's office.

 

Each committee shall operate according to the latest version of Robert's Rules of Order, Newly Revised. Minutes of each committee are on file in the Faculty Senate office and available electronically on the Faculty Senate web site and shall be sent to members of the committee and Chair of the Faculty.  , the Faculty Senate office, and the Chair of the Committee on Committees.    

 

A file on each committee's activities, minutes, and other records shall be maintained in the Faculty Senate office.  All committees and subcommittees, unless prohibited explicitly by the committee's charge, University policies, or state statutes, shall hold their regular and special meetings in open session in accordance with the North Carolina Open Meetings Law, and the chairperson of committees shall inform the Senate office of the time and place of such meetings so they may be placed on the Senate calendar and publicized in order that interested faculty may attend.

 

The committees' annual reports shall be composed by the committee officers according to the official form and submitted to the Faculty Senate office for duplication and distribution to the Chair of the Faculty, the Chair of the Committee on Committees, the present members of the committee, and the new members of the committee whose terms begin next academic year.  Copies of the committees' annual reports will be kept on file in the University Archives Joyner Library, Faculty Senate office, and made available electronically on the Faculty Senate web site.  Upon request, copies of committees' annual reports shall be made available by the Faculty Senate office.

 

The Chair of the Faculty shall each year compile the Annual Report of the Faculty Senate. This report, among other things, shall contain a summary of Senate and Senate committees' activities for the immediate past year. 

 

The Chair's Annual Report of the Faculty Senate will be distributed to the Chancellor, academic Vice Chancellors and made available on the Faculty Senate web site. for Academic Affairs, the Vice Chancellor for Health Sciences, the Vice Chancellor for Student Life, the Vice Chancellor for Institutional Advancement, and Chairs of all Faculty Senate and Academic Committees.  Copies of the report will also be kept on file in the University Archives Joyner Library and the Faculty Senate office.  In addition, copies of the Chair's Annual Report of the Faculty Senate will be distributed to the members of the Faculty Senate not later than the first regular Faculty Senate meeting of the next academic year.

 

Currently there are two Faculty Senate committees (Agenda Committee and Committee on Committees), five appellate committees (Due Process Committee, Faculty Grievance Committee, Grievance Board, Hearing Committee, and Reconsideration Committee), and eighteen seventeen academic committees as follows: 

Academic Awards Committee

Academic Standards Committee

Admission and Retention Policies Committee

Calendar Committee

Continuing and Career Education Committee

Educational Policies and Planning Committee

Faculty Governance Committee

Faculty Information Technology Review Committee

Faculty Welfare Committee

Libraries Committee

Research/Creative Activity Grants Committee

Student Academic Appellate Committee

Student Scholarships, Fellowships, and Financial Aid Committee

Teaching Grants Committee

Unit Code Screening Committee

University Athletics Committee

University Budget Committee

University Curriculum Committee

 

As the need arises, additional committees are created, by the Committee on Committees to assist in the academic policy-making process.

 

V.  Graduate School Administrative Board  Administrative Board of the Graduate School

The Chair of the Faculty or his/her designee shall serve as an ex-officio member without vote.  The duties and responsibilities of this Board are described in Appendix F. of the ECU Faculty Manual.

 

VI.  Faculty Assembly Delegates and Alternates

The process for election of Faculty Assembly Delegates and Alternates (Part X, Charter of the University of North Carolina Faculty Assembly) will be as follows:

1.  The Faculty Assembly nomination form will be distributed to all faculty by the Committee on Committees with assistance of the office personnel (via the Faculty Senate office), in November.  The completed nomination forms are due in the Faculty Senate office in December.

2.  The Committee on Committees will review the nominations and present to the Faculty Senate a slate of one or more nominees as there are vacancies to fill.  Nominations may also be made from the Faculty Senate floor.  Faculty Assembly representatives will be elected by the Faculty Senate at its January regular meeting.  Election will be by majority present and voting.  One Faculty Assembly Delegate will be the Chair of the Faculty, holding a term for each year he/she is elected to serve as Chair of the Faculty.  No Chair of the Faculty may serve as a Faculty Assembly Delegate for more than six consecutive years.

 

 

Approved:      Faculty Senate Resolution #93-21

21 April 1993

                        East Carolina University Chancellor

 

Amended:      Faculty Senate Resolution #94-40, August 1995
                       
Faculty Senate Resolution #96-20, August 1996
                       
Faculty Senate Resolution #97-14, March 1997
                       
Faculty Senate Resolution #00-19, April 2000
                       
Faculty Senate Resolution #01-9, February 2001