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    Graduate Researcher Profiles

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     Learn what graduate student Sam Myers is doing
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     See why this Health Psychology Ph.D candidate wants
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     Mark Hand
     Doctoral Candidate Mark Hand's research on
     pressure ulcer prevention, may help improve the
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     patients.

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     Mahealani Kaneshiro-Pineiro
     Discover why this researcher is not afraid of jellyfish.

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     She's bringing old-time general stores into new
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     Lance Bollinger
     Discover how graduate student Lance Bollinger's research
     on protein degradation may lead to treatment strategies
     for people with muscle atrophy.

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     Kaitlin Morrison
     This graduate student searches for new targets for
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MINUTES

Graduate School Administrative Board


Monday, December 4, 2006
Mendenhall Underground

Present: Sharon Bland, Sylvia Brown, Dennis Brunt, Stan Eakins, Gerhard Kalmus, John Kramar, George Kasperek, Vivian Mott, Ron Newton, Belinda Patterson, Pat Pellicane, John Placer, Heather Ries, Art Rouse, Carmine Scavo, Mark Taggart, and Ginger Woodard.

1.    Call meeting to order – Pellicane

Patrick Pellicane called the meeting to order at 3:40pm

2.    Approval of minutes of previous meeting – Pellicane

The minutes were approved as submitted by Belinda Patterson

3.    Graduate Curriculum Committee Report – Kasperek

The GCC Meeting Minutes (see attached) and the GCC Graduate Catalogue Minutes were presented for approval.  A motion was submitted for approval of both with the exception of the following:

A question was posed about the availability of resources for new graduate courses that are offered.  Has this issue been discussed with the submission for new course approval?  Are additional resources needed?  Are resources being shifted?  If resources are an issue, then duplication of courses between respective units would increase the demand on a limited resource pool.  Who is in charge of the resource issue in a particular program?   The resource issue applies to the submitted new course, COMM 6031, which overlaps with the presently offered course, ADED 6240. After discussion, a motion to table the approval of COMM 6031 was passed.   Representatives of the affected academic units will be invited to the next GSAB meeting to provide a perspective on the content of the two courses as well as the resources required.  

4.    ECU Research Week  – Newton

The ECU Research Week for students was presented by Newton.  The event will be held during the last week of March, 2007.  Solicitation for participation by faculty and students was encouraged.  It was suggested that a content category, “Human Health,” be included.  It was also suggested that the event be inclusive as possible, particularly to include those students who would be presenting in a “creative” arena.  It was suggested that we provide a tentative schedule for the ten sessions to the GSAB representatives so that they can have that information when asking for faculty and students to participate in the session organizing process. 

5.    Resource Allocation (2006-2007) – Pellicane

Pellicane provided a perspective on his thoughts and ideas relative to resource allocation for graduate studies (see attachment).  He presented several organizing principles.  Help is needed from GSAB in providing guidance and information.  Resource allocation has to be efficient.  Pellicane mentioned that certain units such as Business and Education are self-sufficient, while other units are “sinks.”  Allocations in the past have been based on legacy, therefore the process will need “some fixing.”  Will have to find the available “tools” to do this.  In many cases, institutional data are lacking.  Allocations have not increased since 1999, and we don’t have enough resources.  The timing of resource allocations in the past has not been such where unit strategic planning could take place.  In the future, we will have allocations known on Feb 1.  It was noted that the east and west campuses are funded differently.  We will look to the future, not the past.  We consider models that define income and expenses of a program that are within our institutional values.  We will need to know the extent of the income/expense ratio which will be one of the indicators of evaluation.  We will be making transitions, but must adhere to commitments made to students (who have not had two years of support) in the system.  The graduate student contract process will have to be refined and will need to be more punctual.  It goes without saying that the ECU allocation process is very complex, and will take some time to totally understand. 

It was mentioned that external funding for master’s students is more difficult than for doctoral students.  It is important to have some workshops in informing new graduate programs directors about administering graduate education in their respective units.  Relative to resource allocation, master’s programs have been the mainstay of ECU.  Without deliberate resource allocation considerations, 6 new doctoral programs and 10 new master’s programs have been started since 1999! 

Parameters for resource allocation need to be considered more rationally.  One example is the “time to completion of the degree.”  Master’s programs should provide support for students for 2-yrs, but should not be extended beyond that.  Today many students are being funded for 3, 4, and 5 yrs.  Master’s students (in programs requiring about 30 credits) should not be funded for more years than two years with Graduate School funds. We will have to work hard to get the parameter data that are needed.  The internal process at ECU in obtaining these data will need to be upgraded.  Furthermore, we will have to “filter the data” in a reasonable fashion before we can make adequate evaluations.  Teaching productivity is easy to measure by considering the ratio of SCH/No. FTE’s.  A “discovery productivity” (see attached) needs to define a “common productivity” value that can be used amongst all units.  Rigor of programs (GPA, ECU GPA/entering student quality ratios, number of students/FTE’s ratio) can be calculated.  “At the end of the day,” there will always be a “visual override” of the data – this has to reflect our institutional values.   

Are the institutional values regional? national? global? how do you relate these values to student quality?  We will have both regional and national values – master’s programs usually are more regional – doctoral programs are usually more national (global).  Some programs have dictate policies that we will have to adhere to (ex. limited enrollment, mandates from the legislature, etc.).  In summary, all of the parameters will have to consider in their totality, i.e. a cumulative frequency (see attachment) where parameter frequency vs. parameter of interest are related as shown graphically with a curve.  The question that can be posed is: where on the curve does a particular program lie?  If a unit is consistently low in many parameters of interest, then the program should be more scrutinized. 

The presentation and discussion ended.

Pellicane thanked the GSAB for their interest and attendance and wished them a happy holiday season.  He was particularly thankful for their wisdom and discussion remarks and for the joy he has received in conducting the bi-weekly meetings.  The meeting was adjourned at 4:50pm.  
           
Respectfully submitted,

Ronald J. Newton. Recorder




















Graduate Curriculum Committee (GCC)
Catalog Minutes
Wednesday, November 15, 2006


The following Catalog revisions were approved by the GCC:


PAGE 198

COMM: COMMUNICATION

6000. Communication Theory (3) P: Admission to MA in communication or consent of graduate program coordinator. Examination and analysis of principal communication theories, including interpersonal, intercultural, organizational, small group communication and media.

6030. Research Methods (3) P: Admission to MA in communication or consent of graduate program coordinator. Qualitative and quantitative methodologies used in the field of communication.


TABLED

6031. Communication Pedagogy (3) P: Admission to MA in communication or consent of graduate program coordinator. Focuses on communication education, research, theory, and application.

6110. Media Effects (3) P: Admission to MA in communication or consent of graduate program coordinator. Survey of psychological and sociological effects that media has on attitudes, knowledge, values and behaviors.



PAGE 139

PTHE: PHYSICAL THERAPY

PTHE 8001. Advances in Muscle Research (2) P: PTHE 7104 or consent of the instructor. Foundation in pathophysiology and/or rehabilitation of muscle with emphasis on evidence-based research.

PTHE 8002. Advances in Foot and Ankle Pathology Lower Extremity Evaluation (2) P: PTHE 7300. Advanced techniques for evaluation and treatment of patients with foot and ankle lower extremity pathology. Detailed information in , including biomechanics and instrumented gait analysis.

PTHE 8003. Advances in Prosthetics and Orthotics (2) P: PTHE 7200. Current amputee, prosthetic and orthotic therapeutic interventions with emphasis on evidence-based research.

PTHE 8005. Advanced Topics in Pediatric Physical Therapy (2) P: PTHE 7401. Advanced techniques for examination, evaluation and intervention for infants, children, and adolescents with/at risk for movement dysfunction in the pediatric population. Use of scientific evidence to aid in clinical decision-making.

PTHE 8006. Geriatric Balance and Gait Disorders (2) P: PTHE 7402. Advanced knowledge and skill in the evaluation and treatment of geriatric patients with balance and gait disorders. Emphasis on selected populations at high risk for falls.

PTHE 8070. Research Concentration (3) May be repeated. May count maximum of 9 s.h. toward the degree. P: Consent of the instructor. Directed research with graduate level faculty.



PAGE 63

BIOL: BIOLOGY

DEPARTMENT OF BIOLOGY

Ronald J. Newton Thomas J. McConnell, Interim Chairperson, BN-108 Howell Science Complex
Gerhard W. Kalmus, Director of Graduate Studies, BN-108E Howell Science Complex

As a prerequisite to graduate study in a degree program, the Department of Biology requires that the applicant meet the admission requirements of the university, make satisfactory scores on the Graduate Record Examinations, and show competence in specific related areas. Each entering student should consult the director of graduate studies in biology prior to beginning graduate work.

Students must complete a minimum of 30 s.h. of course work (15 s.h. must be at the 6000-7000 level), a research-based thesis, a written comprehensive examination, a seminar based on thesis research, and a thesis defense and must show competence in teaching. Successful completion of the comprehensive examination consists of a passing grade on a written examination developed and graded by the student’s thesis committee.

Up to 20 percent of required credit hours may be earned at another institution. See the director of graduate studies for acceptable transfer courses or consent to take courses off campus. The department attempts to offer courses on a one- or two-year rotation. However, because of changing interests of graduate students, it is unlikely that all the courses listed below will be offered in a two-year period.

For the PhD in interdisciplinary biological sciences, see the Brody School of Medicine.

MS in Biology

1. Core: BIOL 6880, 7000*; BIOS 7021 or 7022; and 7 s.h. of electives.............15 s.h.
2. Concentration area (Choose a minimum of 15 s.h. from one area.)................15 s.h.
Cell biology:
BIOL 5450, 5451, 5630, 5631, 5800, 5810, 5821, 5870, 5890, 5900, 5901, 6030, 6082, 6083, 6100, 6120, 6130, 6200, 6230, 6231, 6250, 6251, 6300, 6301, 6504, 6900, 7080, 7090, 7091, 7130, 7170, 7180, 7181, 7190, 7210, 7211, 7212, 7213, 7345, 7370, 7480, 7481, 7870, 7890, 7895.
Environmental and organismic biology:
BIOL 5070, 5071, 5150, 5151, 5200, 5201, 5220, 5221, 5230, 5231, 5260, 5261, 5270, 5351, 5400, 5401, 5550, 5551, 5600, 5601, 5640, 5641, 5680, 5730, 5731, 5740, 5741, 5950, 5951, 6010, 6040, 6041, 6071, 6210, 6220, 6514, 6700, 6800, 6820, 6821, 6850, 6860, 6910, 6920, 7020, 7021, 7300, 7360, 7630, 7920

*BIOL 7000 may be repeated for registration status, but only 6 s.h. may count toward graduation.

MS In Molecular Biology and Biotechnology

The candidate must have had undergraduate course work, or otherwise demonstrate competency, equivalent to two semesters of biochemistry, genetics, and microbiology. Deficiencies in these areas must be made up before a degree is awarded. No more than 3 s.h. of courses at the 5000 and 6000 level taken to acquire basic competency may count toward the degree. The candidate must also take BIOL 2100, 2101 or pass a practical examination in this course. (No graduate credit will be awarded for BIOL 2100, 2101.) The degree requires 30 s.h. of credit as follows.

1. Required courses (13 s.h.): BIOL 6880, 7000*, 7170, 7870, 7890.
2. A minimum of 14 s.h. (including two of the ** courses) must be taken from the following: BIOL 5260, 5261, 5510, 5511, 5520, 5521, 5890, 5900**, 5901**, 5930, 5931, 6030, 6082, 6083, 6100, 6120, 6200, 6230, 6231, 6250**, 6251**, 6504, 6514, 6992, 6993, 7080, 7180**, 7181**, 7190, 7210, 7211, 7212, 7213, 7480**, 7481**, 7890, 7895.
3. Electives: A maximum of 3 s.h. may be designated at the candidate’s option as elective hours with the approval of the graduate director and the candidate’s advisor, to complete graduation requirements of 30 s.h. for this degree.

*BIOL 7000 may be repeated for registration status, but only 6 s.h. may count toward graduation.

Internship Option: Qualified students will be encouraged to spend from six months to one year in an internship at an industrial or governmental research laboratory. From 2-5 s.h. of internship credit can be applied toward the degree.


BIOL: BIOLOGY

5070, 5071. Ornithology (4,0) 3 lecture hours and 1 3-hour lab per week. Field trips to observe native birds in natural surroundings required. P: 8 s.h. in BIOL. Survey of world’s birds. Emphasis on ecology, evolution, and behavior: adaptive radiation, migration, flight mechanics, morphology, taxonomy, bird song, reproduction, population biology, and conservation of birds.

5150, 5151. Herpetology (4,0) 3 lectures and 1 3-hour lab per week. P: 8 s.h. in BIOL. Taxonomy, anatomy, physiology, distribution, phylogeny, natural history, and ecology of reptiles and amphibians of the world. Emphasis on species of NC and Atlantic Coastal Plain.

5200, 5201. Invertebrate Zoology (4,0) 3 lectures and 1 3-hour lab per week. P: 6 s.h. in BIOL. General comparative anatomical and physiological aspects of invertebrate groups. Emphasis on similarities, differences, and evolution.

5220, 5221. Limnology (4,0) 3 lectures and 1 3-hour lab per week. P: BIOL 2250, 2251; or consent of instructor. Physical, chemical, and biological factors of inland waters and their influence on aquatic organisms.

5230. Biology of Algae (3) 3 lecture hours per week. P: BIOL 1100, 1101 (or equivalent) or consent of instructor. Surveys physiology, ecology evolution, and importance to society of organisms commonly referred to as algae.

5231. Biology of Algae Laboratory (1) 1 3-hour lab per week. C: BIOL 5230 or consent of instructor. Surveys algal form and function, combined with a group project that uses molecular biotechnology to study some aspect of algal biology.

5260, 5261. Microbial Ecology (4,0) 3 lectures and 2 2-hour labs per week. P: BIOL 2250, 2251, 3220, 3221; or consent of instructor. Interactions between microorganisms and their physical, chemical, and biological environment. Microbial involvement in energy flow, nutrient cycling, and intra/inter-specific interactions. Introduces statistical analyses of biological and ecological data.

5270. Marine Community Ecology (3) P: BIOL 2250, 2251; or consent of instructor. Advanced examination of ecology of marine and brackish water communities based on principles of population biology and community ecology. Emphasis on current hypotheses concerning processes structuring major communities.

5351. Biological Processes and the Chemistry of Natural Water (2) 6 lab hours per week. P: BIOL 2250, 2251; 2 CHEM courses; or consent of instructor. Interactions of water quality and biological processes in aquatic ecosystems.

5400. Wetland Ecology and Management (3) P: BIOL 2250, 2251; or consent of instructor. Marshes, swamps, bogs, fens, and other intermittently flooded ecosystems. Emphasis on classification, ecosystem processes, structure, and management of freshwater and saltwater wetlands.

5401. Wetland Ecology Laboratory (1) P: BIOL 2250, 2251; C: BIOL 5400. Application of methods to measure ecological properties, assess functioning, identify plant communities, and understand landscape interaction of wetland ecosystems.

5450, 5451. Histology (4,0) 2 lectures and 2 2-hour labs per week. P: 4 BIOL courses. Organization of cells, tissues, and organs at microscopic level.

5510, 5511. Transmission Electron Microscopy (4,0) 2 lecture and 6 lab hours per week. P for undergraduate students: Senior standing as BIOL major or consent of instructor. Introduces theory, design, and use of transmission electron microscope and preparation of biological materials for its use.

5520, 5521. Scanning Electron Microscopy and X-Ray Analysis (2,0) 1 lecture and 4 lab hours per week. P for undergraduate students: Senior standing as a BIOL major or consent of instructor. Introduces theory and techniques of scanning electron microscopy and X-Ray analysis and preparation of materials for both.

5550, 5551. Ichthyology (4,0) 2 lectures and 2 3-hour labs per week. Evolution and biology of world’s major fish groups. Emphasis on NC species.

5600, 5601. Fisheries Techniques (3,0) For biology majors interested in marine biology. Field trips and field studies are integral. 2 lectures and 1 3-hour lab or field excursion per week. P: BIOL 2250, 2251; or equivalent. Practical training in field and lab experimental methods in fisheries techniques.

5630, 5631. Comparative Animal Physiology (4,0) 3 lectures and 1 3-hour lab per week. P: 2 BIOL and 2 organic CHEM courses. Principles of function of organ systems of major groups of animals. Nutrition, digestion, respiration, skin and temperature control, blood and circulatory systems, excretion, the muscular-skeletal system, nervous coordination, and endocrine system.

5640, 5641. Entomology (4,0) 3 lectures and 1 3-hour lab per week. P: 12 s.h. BIOL. General anatomy, physiology, ecology, and classification of insects.

5680. Current Topics in Coastal Biology (3) P: Consent of instructor. Seminar on environmental issues in coastal biology presented by directed reading, lecture, and discussion.

5730, 5731. Animal Physiological Ecology (4,0) 3 lectures and 1 3-hour lab per week. P: BIOL 2250, 2251; 3310, 3311 or 3320, 3321 or 5800, 5821; or consent of instructor. Physiological adjustments and responses of animals to their environment. Considers mechanisms involved and invertebrate, vertebrate, aquatic, and terrestrial animals.

5740, 5741. Behavioral Ecology (4,0) 3 lecture and 2 discussion hours per week. P: BIOL 3520 or 4200, 4201. Animal behavior from evolutionary perspective. Readings from current scientific literature and weekly discussions.

5750, 5751. Introduction to Regional Field Ecology (2,0) (5750:WI) For science and environmental studies teachers. 20 hours of lecture and 32 hours of field trips. May not count toward MS in BIOL or molecular biology/biotechnology. Major regional ecosystems.

5800. Principles of Biochemistry I (3) 3 lecture hours per week. P: BIOL 3310, 3311; or consent of instructor; CHEM 2760, 2763. Intermediary metabolism, metabolic processes, and metabolic regulation of major groups of compounds in living cells.

5810. Principles of Biochemistry II (3) May be taken before BIOL 5800. P: BIOL 3310, 3311; or consent of instructor; CHEM 2760, 2763. Protein biochemistry. Structure and function of amino acids and proteins, including protein biosynthesis and kinetics. Structures illustrated using computer-modeling techniques.

5821. Principles of Biochemistry Laboratory (1) Required for biochemistry majors; recommended for biology majors. P/C for undergraduate students: BIOL 5800 or 5810. General biochemistry lab designed to complement BIOL 5800, 5810.

5870. Molecular Genetics (3) P: BIOL 2300; RP: BIOL 3220, 3221, 5810, 5821. Genetics of prokaryotic and eukaryotic organisms at molecular level. Structure and function of nucleic acids; replication, recombination, and repair; control of gene expression; and other related topics.

5890. Virology (3) P: BIOL 2100, 2101 or 7870; 3220, 3221. Plant, animal, and bacterial viruses. Emphasis on distinctive features of viruses as related to parasitism, disease, and basic research.

5900, 5901. Biotechniques and Laboratory (2,3) 2 1-hour lectures and 2 4-hour labs per week. P: BIOL 2100, 2101, 7870; consent of instructor; RP: BIOL 5810, 5821; C for 5901: BIOL 5900. Theory and practice of modern genetic engineering technology. Topics include DNA purification, electrophoresis, restriction mapping, use of DNA modifying enzymes, basic cloning in plasmid vectors, and strain construction by conjugation and transduction.

5930, 5931. Microcomputer Applications in Molecular Biology (2,0) 1 lecture and 1 3-hour lab per week. P: BIOL 3310, 3311; or 5810, 5821; or 5870. Techniques for analysis of biological characteristics of nucleic acid and protein molecules using BASIC with microcomputers.

5950, 5951. Taxonomy of Vascular Plants (4,0) 1 2-hour lecture and 1 4-hour lab per week. P: 12 s.h. BIOL or consent of instructor; RP: BIOL 2250, 2251. Plant importance, identification, classification, and evolution as well as how plants interact with living and nonliving environments. Field experiences emphasize major communities and dominant floral elements of coastal NC.

5995. Internship (1) 3 hours per week. May be repeated once for a maximum of 2 s.h. P: Consent of instructor. Lab experiences under direct supervision of a member of biology faculty.

6003. Seminar (1) Student, staff, and guest speakers on current research.

6010. Estuarine Ecology (2) P: BIOL 2250, 2251; or consent of instructor. Physical properties, energy flow, biogeochemical cycling, and biological patterns of estuaries.

6030. Topics in Cell Biology (3) P: Consent of instructor. Some combination of current work in bioenergetics, membrane biology, immunobiology, cell/organelle differentiation, and functions of specialized cells. Other topics not routinely considered in undergraduate courses will be reviewed also. Content varies with instructor interests.

6040, 6041. Animal Behavior (4,0) 3 lectures and 1 3-hour lab per week. P: Consent of instructor. Presentation of historical development of animal behavior as field of study through directed reading, discussion, and practical experience. Presentation of some current principles and experimental approaches to animal behavior.

6071. Human Gross Anatomy (4) P: Consent of instructor. Dissection-based regional study of human cadaver.

6082, 6083. Fundamentals of Vertebrate Endocrinology (3,1) 3 lectures and 1 3-hour lab per week. P: BIOL 3310, 3311; or 3320, 3321; or equivalent; C for 6083: BIOL 6082. Neurosecretions and endocrine glands. Emphasis on evolution, development, morphology, and physiology of endocrine system. Hormone biosynthesis and mechanisms of action.

6100, 6120. Advances in Molecular Biology (2,2) May be repeated once for credit with consent of instructor. P: BIOL 5810, 5821; or 5870; consent of instructor. Indepth focus on problems of current interest in molecular biology and genetic engineering. Topics vary.

6110. Bioterrorism and Biosecurity (3) Detection and identification of and defense against biological warfare agents, including international and domestic security programs.

6130. Advances in Developmental Biology (2) P: Consent of instructor. Recent advances in animal and plant development. Specific discussion includes gene regulation, embryonic induction, hormone action, cell movement, cell growth, photoperiodism, etc., in relation to differentiation.

6200. Mechanisms of Genetic Recombination (2) P: BIOL 3220, 3221; or 5870; 5810, 5821; consent of instructor. Aspects of genetic recombination, including general and site specific recombination, gene mapping methods, DNA and RNA sequence rearrangements, and transposable genetic elements. Emphasis on current developments in growing field.

6210. Phylogenetic Theory (3) Theory and practice of modern phylogenetic methods. Topics include basic evolutionary concepts, reconstructing evolutionary relationships using molecular and other data, and statistical methods for assessing reliability of phylogenetic analyses. Emphasis on hands-on experience with phylogenetic computer programs.

6220. Evolution: Topics for Advanced Students (3) P: A genetics course. Current concepts of evolution, presented by reading, lecture, and discussion.

6230, 6231. Advanced Techniques in Molecular Biology (2,3) 2 lectures and 2 4-hour labs per week. P: BIOL 5900, 5901; C for 6231: 6230. Advanced genetic engineering techniques for basic and applied research.

6250, 6251. Protein Purification Techniques (4,0) P: BIOL 5810, 5821. Purification methods used to isolate enzymes and other proteins from living cells. Recombinant DNA-based enzyme purification techniques.

6300, 6301. Neurophysiology (3,0) 2 lectures and 1 3-hour lab per week. P: BIOL 3310, 3311; or 3320, 3321; or equivalent. Cellular physiology of neurons and interrelationships between neurons.

6410. Contemporary Molecular and Cellular Biology for Advanced Placement Teachers (2) Indepth review of energy transformations in cells, cell division, molecular genetics, and enzyme systems. Emphasis on advances in knowledge during past decade. Course coordinator arranges lecturers on selected topics.

6420. Contemporary Organismal Biology for Advanced Placement Teachers (2) Indepth review of plant structure and function. Emphasis on angiosperms, animal structure, and function. Vertebrates and reproduction and development of plants and animals. Course coordinator arranges lecturers on selected topics that emphasize advances in knowledge during past decade.

6430. Contemporary Population Biology for Advanced Placement Teachers (2) Indepth review of genetics, evolution, behavior, ecology, and social biology. Emphasis on advances in knowledge during the past decade. Course coordinator arranges lecturers on selected topics.

6504, 6514. Research Problems in Biology (2,2) 4 research hours per week. May be repeated for credit with change of topic. P: Consent of instructor. Research completed under supervision of faculty member.

6700. Plant Physiological Ecology (2) P: One ecology course. Physiological mechanisms of plants relevant at individual, community, and ecosystem levels. Emphasis on higher plants in stressful environments.

6800. Population Ecology (2) P: One ecology course; consent of instructor. Intrinsic and extrinsic controls of microbe,
plant, and animal population dynamics.

6820, 6821. Systems Ecology (3,0) 2 lectures and 1 3-hour lab per week. P: One ecology course; consent of instructor. Ecosystem structure and function utilizing systems analysis methods and computer models.

6850, 6860. Advances in Ecology (2,2) May be repeated for credit with change of topic. P: BIOL 2250, 2251; or equivalent; consent of instructor. Advanced treatment of specialized topics in ecology. Emphasis on readings from primary literature.

6880. Introduction to Research (2) Library reference services and cataloging systems. Writing techniques and problems encountered in preparation of thesis and research publications.

6900. Vertebrate Reproductive Biology (3) P: One cell and developmental biology or physiology course or consent of instructor. Mechanisms involved in vertebrate reproduction. Morphology, physiology, and biochemistry of reproductive systems. Topics include neuroendocrine control, environmental, and other factors regulating reproductive cycles as well as current research in reproductive technology.

6910. Coastal Ecological Processes (4,0) For PhD students without biology backgrounds and biology MS students. Provides PhD students in coastal resources management with fundamental concepts of ecology within context of coastal zone and with emphasis on local ecosystems.

6920. Conservation Biology (2) 2-hour lecture and discussion per week. P: Consent of instructor; RP: an ecology course. Applies principles of ecology, biogeography, population genetics, economics, sociology, anthropology, and philosophy to maintenance and restoration of biological diversity and management.

6992, 6993. Internship in Applied Biology (3,2) Variable classroom and/or lab hours per week. P: Completion of basic courses prescribed by joint screening committee composed of faculty from the biology department closely allied to proposed area of study and representatives from specific applied area (industry, government, etc.) Experience in classroom, research, governmental, or industrial applications of biology.

6994. Internship (1) 3 contact hours per week. May be repeated for credit. P: Consent of instructor. Experience in classroom situations under direct supervision of biology faculty member.

7000. Thesis (3) May be repeated. May count maximum of 6 s.h.

7001. Thesis: Summer Research (1) May be repeated. No credit may count toward degree. Students conducting thesis research may only register for this course during summer.

7020, 7021. Marine Biology (3,0) Formerly BIOL 6020, 6021 P: Consent of instructor. Biology and ecology of marine organisms with at least one field trip to coast for collection and identification.

7080. Molecular Endocrinology (3) P: Consent of instructor. Review of modern concepts, theories, techniques and frontiers of molecular endocrinology with emphasis on functions, structures, signaling and regulation of hormones and receptors.

7090, 7091. Experimental Embryology (4,0) Formerly BIOL 6090, 6091 3 lecture and 1 3-hour lab per week. P: BIOL 4060, 4061. Historical and current understanding of molecular mechanisms underlying development. Applies experimental techniques to marine invertebrates, amphibian, and chick material.

7130. Current Literature in Development Biology (1) P: Consent of instructor. Review of current research literature related to development biology. Emphasis on critical analysis.

7170. Immunology I (3) P: 1 course in genetics and 1 course in microbiology, or consent of instructor. Introduces immunology. Emphasis on lymphocytes, antigen presenting cells, lymphoid tissue, and antibodies.

7180, 7181. Cell Culture and Hybridoma Technology (3,0) Formerly BIOL 6180, 6181 1 lecture and 6 lab hours per week. P: BIOL 7170 or equivalent. Principles and mechanisms of producing monoclonal antibodies. Emphasis on basic science application of monoclonal antibodies and laboratory techniques in cell culture and construction of hybridomas. Includes discussion of recent literature that includes scientific application of monoclonal antibodies.

7190. Immunology II (3) Formerly BIOL 6190 P: BIOL 7170 or equivalent. Emphasis on MHC and T cell biology. Includes review and presentation of recent immunological literature.

7210, 7211. Transgenic Methodology and Application (2,3) 2 lectures and 1 6-hour lab per week. P: BIOL 5900, 5901 or consent of instructor; C for 7211: BIOL 7210. Production of transgenic animals and evaluation of selected genetic engineered constructs.

7212, 7213. Gene Targeting and Knockout Animals (2,3) 2 lectures and 1 6-hour lab per week. P: BIOL 5900, 5901, 6480, 6481; or consent of instructor; C for 7212: BIOL 7213. Gene manipulation and production of knockout animals.

7300. Landscape Ecology (3) P: Consent of instructor; RP: an ecology course; a statistics course. Interaction between spatial distribution of habitat patches and ecological processes at different scales.

7345. Cell Motility (2) Formerly BIOL 6345 Same as ANAT 7345; BIOC 7345 P: General chemistry, organic chemistry, general biology, and general physics; or consent of instructor. Multidisciplinary exploration of mechanism, structure, and function of motile systems essential for eukaryotic life.

7360. Fisheries Management (3) P: BIOL 2250 or 3660; MATH 2121; consent of instructor. Introduces fisheries management topics, including exploited populations of living aquatic resources – fish, shellfish, and other harvestable organisms.

7370. Biological Effects of Radiation (3) Formerly BIOL 5370 Same as RONC 7370 P: BIOL 1100, 1101, 1200, 1201; or consent of instructor. Biological effects resulting from interactions of radiation and matter for scientifically, technically, and medically-oriented students.

7480, 7481. Cell Biology (4,0) Formerly BIOL 6480, 6481 2 lectures and 6 lab hours per week. P: Consent of instructor. Investigates how cells develop, function, communicate, control their activities, and die.

7630. Fish Physiology (3) P: Consent of instructor. Emphasis on basic concepts and research frontiers related to fish physiology.

7870. Molecular Genetics (3) Formerly BIOL 6870 P: 1 course in genetics and 2 semesters of organic chemistry or consent of instructor. Introduces molecular mechanisms responsible for DNA replication, repair, and recombination as well as transcription and translation.

7890. Current Literature in Molecular Biology (1) Formerly BIOL 6890 P: Consent of instructor. Review of current research literature related to molecular biology. Emphasis on critical analysis.

7895. Current Literature in Cell Biology (1) P: Consent of instructor. Review of current research literature related to cell biology. Emphasis on critical analysis.

7920. Conservation Biology (3) Formerly BIOL 6920 P: Consent of instructor; RP: an ecology course. Applies principles of ecology, biogeography, population genetics, economics, sociology, anthropology, and philosophy to maintenance and restoration of biological diversity and management.

8810. Methods and Techniques (3) May be repeated for credit. P: Consent of instructor. One semester rotation through research laboratories supervised by IDPBS approved faculty members.

8815. Seminar in Biological Sciences (1) May be repeated for credit. P: Consent of instructor. Presentations on research or critical review of current literature topics by students in IDPBS program. Seminar presentation.

8830. Introduction to Research (5) May be repeated for credit. May count maximum of 15 s.h. P: Consent of instructor. Assignment to major advisor during second year or program. Design of experimental protocols and participation in research program.

9000. Dissertation (3) May be repeated. May count for a maximum of 18 s.h.

9001. Dissertation: Summer Research (1) May be repeated. No credit may count toward degree. Students conducting dissertation research may only register for this course during the summer.

BIOL Banked Courses

5000, 5001. Radio Tracer Techniques in Biology (3,0)
5020, 5021. Animal Parasitology (4,0)
5040, 5041. Mycology (4,0)
5050. Applied Ecology (3)
5080, 5081. Plant Anatomy and Morphology (4,0)
5110, 5111. Plant Growth and Development (4,0)
5678. Biology of Aging (3)
5850, 5851. Biometry (3,0)
5860, 5861. Biological Applications to Digital Computers (3,0)
5880, 5881. Microbial Physiology (4,0)
5910, 5911. Vascular Plant Systematics (4,0)
5920, 5921. Vertebrate Systematics (4,0)
6050. Biogeography (3)
6640, 6641. Ecological Entomology (4,0)
7530. Readings in Organismic and Field Biology (2)
7540. Readings in Cell Biology and Biochemistry (2)



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LIBS: LIBRARY SCIENCE

7010. Supervision of School Media and Technology Programs (3) Same as EDTC 7010 P: Consent of CAS-LS or MAEd program director. Principles and practices of supervision involved in comprehensive media and technology programs in school district and/or region.

7030. Financial Management of Public Library Organizations (3) P: LIBS 6010, LIBS 6031 or consent of chair. Introduction to theory, resources, concepts, and current practices of the financial management of public libraries.

7050. Seminar on Public Libraries (3) P: LIBS 6031 or equivalent or consent of chair. Characteristics, operations, and problems of public libraries.



PAGE 257

NURS: NURSING

SCHOOL OF NURSING

Phyllis Horns, Dean, 4205L Library, Allied Health, and Nursing Building
Sylvia Brown, Associate Dean for Graduate Programs, 3166A Library, Allied Health, and Nursing Building
Martha Engelke, Associate Dean for Research and Scholarship, 4210C Library, Allied Health, and Nursing Building
Alta Andrews, Associate Dean for Community Partnerships and Practice, 4205H Library, Allied Health, and Nursing Building
Martha Alligood, PhD Director, 4165S Library, Allied Health, and Nursing Building
Dorothy Rentschler, Associate Dean for Undergraduate Programs, 3166F Library, Allied Health, and Nursing Building

MASTER OF SCIENCE IN NURSING

The master of science in nursing program prepares graduates for advanced practice nursing and for leadership roles in a variety of community based or acute care provider agencies. The MSN program offers seven concentrations:

 
Clinical Nurse Specialist in Adult Health (online)
Nurse Anesthesia
Family Nurse Practitioner (online)
Nursing Education (online)
Neonatal Nurse Practitioner (online)
Nursing Leadership (online)
Nurse Midwifery (online)
 

Part-time study is available. Certificate programs are available for post-master’s study in selected areas. The program is accredited by the National League for Nursing Accrediting Commission, 61 Broadway, New York, NY 10006; telephone 212-363-5555.

The nurse midwifery concentration is also accredited by the American College of Nurse-Midwives, Division of Accreditation, 8403 Colesville Road, Suite 1550, Silver Spring, MD 20910; telephone 240-485-1800.

The nurse anesthesia concentration is accredited by the Council on Accreditation of Nurse Anesthesia Educational Programs, 222 South Prospect Avenue, Park Ridge, IL 60068; telephone 847-692-7050.

A RN/MSN option is available for registered nurses who do not have a baccalaureate degree in nursing.

The Alternate Entry (AE) MSN option is a plan of study leading to the MSN degree for individuals who have earned a baccalaureate degree in another field. The program is divided into 2 phases: Phase I (Pre-licensure) includes graduate courses that include content and experiences that are required to take the Registered Nurse Licensure examination (NCLEX-RN) and preparation for advanced study in nursing. Phase I only begins in fall semesters and full-time enrollment is required. Successful completion of the NCLEX-RN and licensure as a Registered Nurse is required prior to entering Phase II clinical concentration courses. Students may enroll in core classes during the first semester of Phase II, while obtaining credentials. Phase II will include courses in a selected clinical concentration.

Admission

Admission to the master of science in nursing degree program requires the student to meet the minimum admission requirements for graduate study as established by the university and the following requirements established by the School of Nursing.

• a baccalaureate degree in nursing from an accredited program
• a minimum GPA of 2.5 in undergraduate studies and a minimum GPA of 3.0 in nursing major
• acceptable score on the Graduate Record Examinations (GRE) or Miller Analogy Test (MAT) within the past five years (GRE score preferred for Nurse Anesthesia concentration applicants)
• currently hold a nonrestricted license to practice as a registered nurse (RN) in North Carolina or a NCSBN compact state (The out-of-state student must procure a North Carolina RN license before enrolling in clinical courses.)
• a statement describing the applicant’s interest in graduate study, career goals, and the MSN degree’s relationship to those goals
• three professional references
• a personal interview with a member of the graduate faculty

Applicants for the nurse midwifery concentration, in addition to the general admission criteria, must have one year RN experience (labor and delivery preferred), demonstrate a commitment to practice with under served populations, and a third reference from a health care provider knowledgeable about the applicant’s nursing practice.

Applicants for the family nurse practitioner concentration, in addition to the general admission criteria, must have one year RN experience and provide a third reference from a health care provider knowledgeable about the applicant’s nursing practice. Application deadline is May 1 for this option.

Applicants for the nurse anesthesia concentration, in addition to the general admission criteria, must have one-year adult critical care experience, completion of a supplemental nurse anesthesia admissions packet, a total of four professional references (two on forms provided in nurse anesthesia admissions packet), and an interview with the Nurse Anesthesia Admissions Committee. Application deadline is April 30 for this option.

Applicants may take core courses while gaining the required RN experience for admission into selected concentrations.

Applicants for admission to the (AE) MSN option must meet general admission requirements. Additional requirements include:

• Completion of prerequisite courses – Chemistry, Human Anatomy & Physiology, Microbiology, Human Growth & Development, Nutrition, Ethics, and Statistics.
• A minimum 3.0 GPA in undergraduate major
• Current non-restricted license to practice as a RN in N.C. or a NCSBN compact state prior to entering Phase II clinical concentration courses.

Application deadline for the (AE) MSN option is February 1.

Completed applications will be considered as they are received, with the exception of Nurse Anesthesia, FNP, and the (AE) MSN option.

Applicants for the neonatal nurse practitioner concentration, in addition to the general admission criteria, must have two years of current practice experience in a critical-care environment for high risk neonatal care RN experience and provide a third reference from a health care provider knowledgeable about the applicant’s nursing practice.

Applicants for the nursing education concentration, in addition to the general admission criteria, must provide a third reference from a health care provider knowledgeable about the applicant’s nursing practice.

Applicants for the clinical nurse specialist concentration, in addition to the general admission criteria, must provide a third reference from a health care provider knowledgeable about the applicant’s nursing practice.

Applicants for the nursing leadership concentration,  in addition to the general admission criteria, must provide a third reference from a health care provider knowledgeable about the applicant’s nursing practice, and must have a basic accounting course that may be taken after admission or exempted with the approval of the concentration director.

Applicants for admission to the RN/MSN option will be evaluated using the following criteria.

• a minimum 3.0 GPA in undergraduate studies and a minimum 3.0 GPA in the nursing major in the previous nursing program
• one year RN experience
• an acceptable score on the GRE or the MAT within the past five years
• current non-restricted license to practice as a RN in North Carolina or a NCSBN compact state
• a statement describing the applicant’s interest in graduate study, career goals, and the MSN degree’s relationship to those goals
• three professional references
• a personal interview with the director of RN/BSN studies and a member of the School of Nursing graduate faculty

PROGRAM PREREQUISITES

A course in statistics with a grade of C or higher and basic computer skills with both applications software and the Internet are prerequisites for all concentrations. A course in basic accounting is a prerequisite for the nursing leadership concentration.

Students in the (AE) MSN option must complete all cognate requirements prior to beginning the program. Admission to the (AE) MSN option does not guarantee entry into a specific graduate concentration.

Students in the RN/MSN option must complete all general education and cognate requirements prior to beginning undergraduate nursing courses. Separate application is made to the graduate program in the first or second semester of study in the RN/MSN option. Students enrolled in the RN/MSN option must maintain a 3.0 GPA in the 15 s.h. of undergraduate nursing courses to be eligible to continue in this option. Admission to the RN/MSN option does not guarantee entry into a specific graduate concentration.

DEGREE REQUIREMENTS

Depending upon the concentration area chosen within the degree program, the master of science in nursing requires 36-68 s.h. credit as follows. Concentrations are clustered as administrative, clinical, and education.

Administrative:
Nursing Leadership – Acute Care Health Systems, 41 s.h.
Nursing Leadership – Community Based Health Systems, 41 s.h.
Nursing Leadership – Educational Systems, 41 s.h.

Clinical:
Clinical Nurse Specialist in Adult Health, 42 s.h.
Family Nurse Practitioner, 50 s.h.
Neonatal Nurse Practitioner, 41 s.h.
Nurse Anesthesia, 68 s.h.
Nurse Midwifery, 46 s.h.

Education:
Nursing Education, 36 s.h.

Requirements:
1. Common core: NURS 6001, 6002, 6003, 6993, 6994.....................................12 s.h.
2. Cluster core (Choose appropriate cluster for concentration.).......................8-20 s.h.
Administrative (9 s.h.): NURS 6971, 6973, 6974
Clinical (12 s.h.): NURS 6050 or 6110*; 6112* or 6208; 6610, 6611(*6110, 6112 acceptable for midwifery concentration only; *6417, *6418, *6419 acceptable for neonatal concentration only)
Clinical for Nurse Anesthesia (20 s.h.): NURS 6610, 6810, 6811, 6813; PTHE 7002
Education (9 s.h.): NURS 6050; 6 s.h. clinical nursing courses
3. Concentration area (Choose one area.).....................................................15-32 s.h.
Administrative (18-21 s.h.):
Nursing Leadership – Acute Care Health Systems (20 s.h.): NURS 6977, 6978, 6983, 6984, 6985, 3 s.h. electives
Clinical (18-36 s.h.):
Clinical Nurse Specialist in Adult Health (18s.h.): NURS 6959, 6960, 6961, 6962; 6 s.h. clinical speciality courses
Family Nurse Practitioner (29 s.h.): NURS 6612, 6613, 6614, 6615, 6616, 6617, 6618, 6619, 6620
Neonatal Nurse Practitioner (22 s.h.): NURS 6420, 6421, 6422, 6423, 6424, 6425
Nurse Anesthesia (36 s.h.): NURS 6805, 6806, 6812, 6814, 6815, 6816, 6817, 6818, 6819, 6820, 6821, 6822, 6823, 6824
Nurse Midwifery (22 s.h.): NURS 6109, 6113, 6115, 6116, 6117, 6118
Nursing Leadership – Community Based Health Systems (20 s.h.): NURS 6310, 6311, 6977, 6978, 6983, 6984
Nursing Leadership – Educational Health Systems (20 s.h.) NURS 6903, 6904, 6909, 6977, 6978, 6983
Education (15 s.h.):
Nursing education (15 s.h.): NURS 6903, 6904, 6905; 6909; 3 s.h. elective or cognate
4. Students in the nursing education concentration who have limited teaching experience may be required to take NURS 6908.

Enrollment is necessary for continued research advisement. A comprehensive assessment is required for graduation for all MSN degree-seeking students.

Students in the RN/MSN option must complete the following undergraduate courses prior to enrolling in any graduate nursing courses–NURS 3020, 3021, 3510, 3900, 4210, 4211.

CERTIFICATE PROGRAMS

Five Six post-MSN certificate options (clinical nurse specialist, family nurse practitioner, neonatal nurse practitioner, nurse-anesthesia, nurse midwifery, and nursing education) offer advanced practice education, qualifying those who complete the clinical options to take national certification exams. In addition, the nursing education post-master’s certificate prepares nurses for beginning teaching roles in nursing education.

Admission Requirements

•    A master’ s degree in nursing from an accredited program
•    A current non-restricted license to practice as a registered nurse (RN) in North Carolina or an NCSBN-compact state. Individual advisement will be necessary for licensure regulations for online out-of-state students.
•    A personal statement describing the applicant’s interest in graduate study, career goals, and the certificate’s relationship to those goals.
•    Three professional references with one reference from an individual who is knowledgeable of the applicant’s nursing practice
•    One year clinical experience as an RN
•    A personal interview with a member of the graduate faculty

Applicants for the nurse midwifery post-master’s certificate, in addition to the general admission criteria, must have one year of RN experience (labor and delivery preferred).

Applicants for the nurse anesthesia post-master’s certificate, in addition to the general admission criteria, must have one year adult critical care experience as a RN, completion of a supplemental nurse anesthesia admission packet, a total of four professional references (two on forms provided in the nurse anesthesia admissions packet), and an interview with Nurse Anesthesia Admissions Committee. Courses in physiology and chemistry/biochemistry within five years are highly recommended. Acceptable score on GRE or MAT within past five years (GRE preferred).

Applicants for the neonatal post-master’s certificate, in addition to the general admission criteria, must have two years of current practice experience as an RN in a critical care environment for high-risk neonatal care.

Applicants for the post-master’s certificate options in clinical nurse specialist, family nurse practitioner, neonatal nurse practitioner, and nurse midwifery must have had graduate-level courses in pathophysiology (reproductive physiology for nurse midwifery), health assessment and pharmacology within the past five years or approval by the concentration director; otherwise, students will be required to take these courses as part of the post-master’s certificate requirement.


Clinical Nurse Specialist: NURS 6959 ,6960 ,6961 ,6962 ………………….12- 30 s.h.

Depending on student’s needs and past education, additional course work from the following may be required: NURS 6208, 6050, 6610, 6611, 6214, 6224 or equivalent clinical courses.

Family Nurse Practitioner: NURS 6612, 6613, 6614, 6615, 6616, 6617, 6618, 6619, 6620.........................................................................................................................29 s.h.
Other courses may be included depending on student’s past education and need.

Neonatal Nurse Practitioner: NURS 6417, 6418, 6419, 6420, 6421, 6422, 6423, 6424, 6425.........................................................................................................................29 s.h.

Nurse Anesthesia: NURS 6610, 6805, 6806, 6810, 6811, 6812, 6813, 6814, 6815, 6816, 6817, 6818, 6819, 6820, 6821, 6822, 6823, 6824; PTHE 7002....................56 s.h.

Nurse Midwifery: NURS 6109, 6110, 6112, 6113, 6115, 6116, 6117, 6118, 6610, 6611………………………………………………………………………………………..34 s.h.

Nursing Education: NURS 6903, 6904, 6905,