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Honors College Courses

Spring 2015 Honors Seminars

Ethics, Global Health and the Fundamental Causes of Disease

Faculty: Dr. Daniel Goldberg (Department of Bioethics and Interdisciplinary Studies)
Course Information: HNRS 2011 001, (3 s.h.) (FC:HU) (WI) (CRN: 31535)
Schedule: Wednesdays 2:00pm-4:50pm
Video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dLNRigwlxwM&feature=youtu.be

Seminar Description: What causes disease across the globe? What causes people in some parts of the world to have much higher rates of certain diseases than others? And what are the implications for global health policy and ethics? This course aims to provide preliminary answers to these questions, but more so to provide students with the knowledge base and understandings needed to begin answering these questions for themselves. The interdisciplinary course will draw readings, insights, and analysis from a number of domains including public health, health policy, law, history, and ethics.  Important Note: This class will offer Humanities credit and count towards satisfying the Writing Intensive requirement.

Genes, Germs, and Nuclear War 

Faculty: Dr. Jessica Bardill (Department of English)
Course Information: HNRS 2011 002, (3 s.h.) (FC:HU) (WI) (CRN: 31621)
Schedule: Tuesdays and Thursdays: 2:00pm-3:15pm
Video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=elJzFEmfqE4&feature=youtu.be

Seminar Description: This course draws upon critical readings, creative texts, and films to engage the following: How do society and the particular fields of genomics, microbiology, and nuclear science interact and how do literature and film help us to understand these interactions? We will focus mainly on the U.S. but as these sciences and their subjects transcend national boundaries, we will also take a global look at similarities and differences. The literature and films here offer spaces to imagine the possibilities of the science, particularly in public health applications but also in basic senses, including the ethical implications and the unforeseen benefits. Each of these sections will be framed with readings on power and citizenship, pushing our understanding of the relations between the state, society, science, and self. Students are required to attend one out of class experiential event of their choosing in consultation with the professor.  Important Note: This class will offer Humanities credit and count towards satisfying the Writing Intensive requirement. 

The Arts, Literature and History of the Sea 

Faculty: Dr. Tim Runyan (Honors College)
Course Information: HNRS 2011 003, (3 s.h.) (FC:HU) (WI) (CRN: 31537)
Schedule: Wednesdays 2:00pm-4:50pm
Video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qk00udDNYRU&feature=youtu.be

Seminar Description: The purpose of this course is to explore the tremendously varied body of literature, art, history, music, film, and theatre related to the sea. Some of the earliest writings focus on the subject of the sea, and the Bible incudes stories of Noah, Jonah and the whale, and an apostle who was a fisherman. Seafarers created unique maritime cultures with their own language, music and arts, such as scrimshaw. Many cultures have deities identified with the sea including Neptune. The greatest work in American literature is considered by many to be Herman Melville's Moby-Dick; or, The Whale (1851), and some of the most compelling adventure writing takes place at sea. Painting, drawing, sculpture, photography, film, graphic arts other works of art frequently have marine themes. Marine art is a growing field within the world of fine art, particularly painting. Filmmakers have created enduring images for the public with subjects ranging from Mutiny on the Bounty, The Perfect Storm, to Titanic. On stage, there are plays and operas on a range of maritime topics. Composers have frequently found inspiration from the sea, including the Frenchman Claude Debussey who composed La Mer. The humanities are as critical to our understanding of the sea as are the marine sciences. The objectives of this course include: exploring the diversity and range of maritime culture including the arts, literature; acquiring a greater appreciation of literature and creative works inspired by the sea; developing reading, writing and critical thinking skills while exploring the engagement of humans with the ocean.  Important Note: This class will offer Humanities credit and count towards satisfying the Writing Intensive requirement. 

Cultural Landscapes of Eastern North Carolina in Photography and Writing 

Faculty: Dr. Daniel Kariko (School of Art and Design) and Dr. Charles Twardy (School of Communication)
Course Information: HNRS 2012 001, (3 s.h.) (FC:FA) (WI) (CRN: 31622)
Schedule: Tuesdays and Thursdays 11:00am-12:15pm
Video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mOynDPB2HIg&feature=youtu.be

Seminar Description: Students in this seminar will develop an integrated written and photographic documentary essay that reflects a deep understanding of place, history, and the current situation of coastal and eastern North Carolina. Through lectures, guest speakers and field trips, we will examine the history of combining photography and writing for documentary purposes, and explore the history and geography of Eastern North Carolina. Lectures and laboratory exercises will help students develop skills as photographers and as writers, and give them a sense of how the two complement each other in contemporary communication. Students will be trained in the creative controls of a digital camera, and to appreciate photography as fine art and documentary practice. They will develop skills as photographers beyond the candid, point-and-shoot use of a camera by learning about digital workflow, the history and contemporary critique of photographic images and photography's impact on visual culture and contemporary society. At the same time, they will learn the basics of lively and colorful feature-style writing, from interview techniques to self-editing. Exercises will help students hone their writing skills by encouraging them to use strong verbs, concrete details and imaginative figures of speech. Writing for and about images will be stressed. Each student will develop a documentary project under the supervision of the instructors and complete both a photographic and written component of that project by the semester's end. This research will be presented at the end of the semester in a short lecture in front of audience consisting of peers and professors.  Important Note: This class will offer Fine Arts credit and count towards satisfying the Writing Intensive requirement. 

Culture, Health and Healing 

Faculty: Dr. Blakely Brooks (Department of Anthropology)
Course Information: HNRS 2013 001, (3 s.h.) (FC:SO) (WI) (CRN: 31623)
Schedule: Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays 1:00pm-1:50pm
Video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xZPnHmXKq8w&feature=youtu.be

Seminar Description: This course will provide a cross-cultural overview of medical systems. We will explore the various responses human groups have developed to cope with disease and illness events. Topics include an introduction to paleopathology, ethnomedical systems, patients, healers, etiology, and help seeking. Alternative healing systems will be studied to present additional models of diagnosis and treatment not represented in western biomedicine, and exploration of this topic will be facilitated by virtual classroom discussions with medical students in Latin America.  Important Note: This class will offer Social Sciences credit and count towards satisfying the Writing Intensive requirement. 

Poor Health: The Psychology of Poverty and Health 

Faculty: Dr. Susan McCammon and Dr. Sam Sears (Department of Psychology)
Course Information: HNRS 2013 002, (3 s.h.) (FC:SO) (WI) (CRN: 35628)
Schedule: Mondays and Wednesdays 11:00am-12:15pm (subject to change)
Video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1xQ8ueK-XxQ&feature=youtu.be

Seminar Description: Researchers report that the mental strain of living in poverty can lower a person's IQ by as much as 13 percent, or about the same as losing a night of sleep. The Harvard economist who reported on this research said, "Picture yourself after an all-nighter. Being poor is like that every day." In this seminar we will examine the psychological and health impact of poverty, psychological theories of poverty, and the psychology of poor people. We will study what psychologists can contribute to help society better understand and FIGHT poverty. This seminar will be co-taught by two faculty members from the Department of Psychology. Dr. Sam Sears founded and directs the Cardiac Psychology clinic at Brody School of Medicine, and studies the psychological adjustment of cardiac patients. Dr. Susan McCammon is the Chair of the Department of Psychology, and studies child mental health and trauma. The course will examine the relationship between psychology and poverty in two directions: 1) How does poverty affect the development and health of children and adults? 2) What Psychological factors/traits/characteristics influence one's ability to rise out of poverty or increase one's risk of becoming/staying poor? The main focus will be on the United States, but some global comparisons will be offered.  Important Note: This class will offer Social Sciences credit and count towards satisfying the Writing Intensive requirement. 

Ocean Exploration: Shipwrecks, Conservation, and Technology 

Faculty: Dr. Tim Runyan (Honors College)
Course Information: HNRS 2013 003, (3 s.h.) (FC:SO) (WI) (CRN: 31624)
Schedule: Tuesdays and Thursdays 11:00am-12:15pm
Video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Sgg8QOt__Gc&feature=youtu.be

Seminar Description: This course is focused on the relationship of humans and the ocean, including the Great Lakes and inland waters. Much of what we know about the ocean is from scientific research, underwater archaeology, and the collective history of people from across the globe and their interaction with the ocean. This includes indigenous peoples, fishermen, explorers, sailors, and the many people that engage the ocean. The purpose of this course is to explore the relationship of humans and the sea, and to explore the importance of the ocean in our lives. Ours is a blue planet—more than two thirds of the surface of the earth is ocean. We depend up on the ocean for food and much of our energy needs—gas and oil, and wind power. Technological developments have produced huge ships laden with containers and other cargo that sustain the global economy. Navies patrol and protect the waters around sovereign states and increasing across the globe, as in the case of addressing piracy off Somalia.  Because the ocean is directly linked to climate, food, energy, national security, and human health, emerging leaders should be acquainted with the role of the ocean in a global society. Through discussion and assignments focused on critical contemporary issues, class members will be encouraged to formulate solutions. Informed leaders are needed to address the many pressing issues concerning the ocean. These include: the creation and management of marine protected areas, an eco-friendly means of energy production, sustainability in harvesting ocean resources, and the framing of effective ocean policies. Scientific research enables us to understand ocean issues, and provides the knowledge to formulate solutions.  Important Note: This class will offer Social Sciences credit and count towards satisfying the Writing Intensive requirement. 

Six Debates Shaping the States: Criminal Justice Issues in the Modern World 

Faculty: Dr. Megan Magers and Dr. Patrick Cundiff (Department of Criminal Justice)
Course Information: HNRS 2013 004, (3 s.h.) (FC:SO) (WI) (CRN: 31635)
Schedule: Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays 10:00am-10:50am
Video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eXGFtBJK7F0&feature=youtu.be

Seminar Description: This course covers some of the most controversial and hotly debated topics in popular discourse related to the criminal justice system, including: the war on drugs, gun control, responses to terrorism, racism, capital punishment, and the goals of punishment. This course offers students an opportunity to learn about these controversial issues, examine international comparisons, and provides them with an introduction to effective policy analysis. Students will be exposed to multiple view points and learn though engagement in structured discussions, debates, and written assignments. The course will also involve guest lectures and guest debate moderation from experts in these research areas.  Important Note: This class will offer Social Sciences credit and count towards satisfying the Writing Intensive requirement. 

Psychology of Talent Development 

Faculty: Dr. Lori Flint (Department of Special Education, Foundations and Research)
Course Information: HNRS 2013 005, (3 s.h.) (FC:SO) (WI) (CRN: 31917)
Schedule: Tuesdays and Thursdays 12:30pm-1:45pm
Video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2FZdNhYiNuw&feature=youtu.be

Seminar Description: Being identified as gifted and/or talented often carries with it stereotypes and misperceptions about you're being "better than" rather than "different from" some others. There are, however, also unique social and emotional aspects to exceptional learners that bear investigation because of their potential impact on the individual and the society within which s/he exists. These include, but are not limited to: perfectionism; over-commitment of energies; overintensities; multipotentiality (not knowing what path to choose because you're good at many things); procrastination; asynchrony with peers; pressure to achieve; identity; twice-exceptionality; inability to switch off, and more. Despite these, there have been few studies of the personality attributes of gifted college students. This course presents students the opportunity to examine and ethically use counseling and guidance instruments, practices, and theories related to affective, career, and educational planning needs of the talented. These will be contextualized in the areas of creative, motivational, intellectual, and specific academics and will lead to the creation of new research that will be disseminated in the discipline of psychology of the gifted.  Important Note: This class will offer Social Sciences credit and count towards satisfying the Writing Intensive requirement. 

Along the AT:  Experiences and Reflections on the Appalachian Trail 

Faculty: Dr. Traci Birch (Department of Geography) and Dr. Mary Beth Corbin (Office of Student Transition)
Course Information: HNRS 2013 006, (3 s.h.) (FC:SO) (WI) (CRN: 34059)
Schedule: Mondays 4:00pm-6:50pm
Video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=H3d3S0KhZBI&feature=youtu.be

Seminar Description:  The purpose of this writing intensive (WI) course is for students to gain a greater understanding of place and how the interpretation and understanding of place can become an instigator for both personal growth and collective action.  Through a series of readings, writing assignments, guest lectures and outdoor activities, students will understand how hiking the Appalachian Trail impacts those who have hiked it.  Students should plan on participating in one weekend pre-AT hike and a 4-day section hike on the Appalachian Trail over the break from April 2-5, 2015.  Important Note: This class will offer Social Sciences credit and count towards satisfying the Writing Intensive requirement. 

Coastal Water Resources: Exploring Sustainable Solutions for the 21st Century 

Faculty: Dr. Mike O'Driscoll (Department of Geological Sciences)
Course Information: HNRS 2014 001, (3 s.h.) (FC:SC) (WI) (CRN: 31625)
Schedule: Mondays 2:00pm-4:50pm
Video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=p6uFJGD2mBU&feature=youtu.be

Seminar Description: This seminar examines the critical water quality and quantity issues facing coastal communities across the globe. Water is essential to life and ecosystems, yet human consumption and activities can influence the availability of clean, sustainable water supplies. How do we protect coastal ground water and surface water resources from contamination? What are the major threats to water quality and quantity in coastal watersheds? How do we ensure there is an adequate supply of clean water for humans and ecosystems? As human population growth increases along our coasts, greater demands for water resources and increased generation of wastewater and urban stormwater has led to an array of water quality and quantity problems that threaten the resilience of coastal communities. Problems such as saltwater intrusion and cultural eutrophication require new solutions, including recycling wastewater, rainwater harvesting, aquifer storage and recovery, reverse osmosis, and other emerging techniques. This course will begin with an overview of how water cycles through coastal watersheds, move on to the effects of human activities on water quality and quantity, and conclude with an overview of the key challenges that affect coastal water resources management across the globe.  Important Note: This class will offer Natural Sciences credit and count towards satisfying the Writing Intensive requirement. 

Marketing Small Businesses: As Seen on TV 

Faculty: Dr. Christy Ashley (Department of Marketing and Supply Chain Management)
Course Information: HNRS 2316 001, (3 s.h.) (FC: None) (WI) (CRN: 34025)
Schedule: Tuesdays and Thursdays 12:30pm-1:45pm
Video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RpoBc4nW_pM&feature=youtu.be

Seminar Description: Sharpen your critical thinking and problem solving skills in the context of Small Business Marketing. As we lay a foundation of marketing concepts, we will watch, discuss and reflect on "cases" from reality television shows that feature small businesses, including: Restaurant: Impossible; Shark Tank; The Profit; Bar Rescue; and The Pitch. You will continue learning on your own as you select your own small business examples and analyze their marketing efforts. Finally, you will apply what you learn. You will team up with a small group of students to run a "pop-up" small business one day at the end of the semester. You will conduct a situation analysis, utilize GIS, develop a plan, forecast demand and budget expenses, implement marketing-mix tactics (including social media and personal selling), and analyze your results. The team that has the highest profits will "win", but everyone wins as the profits will go to the charity(ies) of your choice. This course does not require a business background, and is an appropriate introduction to marketing for all majors who want to practice problem-solving and gain hands-on experience. If you like to piece together information from a variety of sources and push the boundaries of your own creativity to make things happen, this course is for you!  Important Note: This class will satisfy the Writing Intensive requirement.

 

Spring 2014 Honors Seminars

An Assault on Humanity: The Holocaust

Faculty: Dr. Michael Bassman (Honors College)

Behavioral Addictions

Faculty: Dr. Mary Crozier (Department of Addictions and Rehabilitation Counseling)

Extreme Physics

Faculty: Dr. John Kenney (Department of Physics)

Global Heavy Metal Music

Faculty: Dr. Dan Guberman (School of Music)

Global Understanding in Health Sciences: Art as Social Commentary

Faculty: Dr. Annette Greer (Department of Bioethics and Interdisciplinary Studies) and Susan Martin Meggs, MFA (Department of Interior Design)

Honors Creative Writing Workshop: Poetry and Fiction

Faculty: Dr. Liza Wieland (Department of English)

How Do We Know Where We Are?  Exploring Geospatial History and Technology

Faculty: Dr. Viva Reynolds and Dr. Karen Mulcahy (Department of Geography)

In Search of Sacred Space: Liminal Places in the Past and Present

Faculty: Dr. Jessica Christie and Dr. Punham Madhok (School of Art and Design)

Ocean Exploration: Shipwrecks, Conservation, and Technology

Faculty: Dr. Tim Runyan (Honors College)

Polyhedra and Tessellations: Visions of Symmetry in Mathematics, Natural Sciences, Art and Design

Faculty: Dr. Sviatoslav Archava (Department of Mathematics)

The Psychology of Human-Dog Interactions

Faculty: Dr. Lisa Maag (Department of Psychology)

Root that Mountain Down: Appalachian Culture and Rural Imaginings in America

Faculty: Dr. Marc Faris (School of Music) and Leanne Smith, MFA (Department of English)

Science and Society in the Age of Genomics

Faculty: Dr. John Stiller and Dr. Jean-Luc Scemama (Department of Biology)

Social Entrepreneurship, Engagement, and Community Building

Faculty: Dr. Sharon Paynter (Department of Political Science)

 

Spring 2013 Honors Seminars

The Assault on Humanity: The Holocaust

Faculty:  Dr. Michael Bassman (Honors College)

Crime Scene Analysis 

Faculty:  Dr. Anthony Kennedy  (Department of Chemistry) & Dr. Dennis Honeycutt (Department of Criminal Justice)

Cuba:  So Near Yet So Foreign 

Faculty:  Dr. Luci Fernandes (Department of Anthropology)

Israel & the Arabs:  Co-existence & Conflict  

Faculty:  Dr. Mona Russell (Department of History)

Leadership Across the Professions: Foundations in Philosophy, Literature, and Law 

Faculty:  Dr. James LeRoy Smith, (Department of Philosophy) &  Dr. Gregory L. Hassler (Department of Bioethics & Interdisciplinary Studies)  

Life in Space: From Inquiry to Exploration and Back Again 

Faculty:  Dr. John Rummel (Institute for Coastal Science and Policy) & Dr. Matt Schrenk (Department of Biology)

Living Green: The World between Technology and Humanity 

Faculty:  Dr. Mike Behm (Technology Systems), Dr. Robert Chin (Technology Systems), Dr. Eric Connell (Department of Construction Management)

Ocean Exploration: Shipwrecks, Conservation, and Technology 

Faculty:  Dr. Tim Runyan (Honors College)

Pain, Its Paradoxes, and the Human Condition 

Faculty:  Dr. Daniel S. Goldberg, J.D (Department of Bioethics & Interdisciplinary Studies;  Brody School of Medicine)

Puppet Shows that Make a Difference! 

Faculty:  Dr. Deborah Thomson (School of Communication)

What’s on the Table? The Science and Culture of Plants as Food 

Faculty:  Dr. Claudia Jolls (Department of Biology) & Dr. Elizabeth Wall-Bassett (Department of Nutrition)

“Who or What is Controlling You?  A History and Science of Self-determination” 

Faculty:  Dr. Laura Edwards (Department of Psychology) 

Wilderness Writing

Faculty:  Dr. Ashley Egan (Department of Biology) & Ms. Stephanie West-Puckett (Department of English) 

 

Spring 2012 Honors Seminars

The Assault on Humanity: The Holocaust

Faculty:  Dr. Michael Bassman (Honors College)

Around the World in 15 Weeks: An Investigation of Cultural Similarities through Global Conversations with College Students in Africa, Asia, and Latin America

Faculty:  Dr. Heidi Luchsinger (Department of Anthropology)

Building an Innovation Economy Through Creative Problem Solving, Design and Entrepreneurship

Faculty: Mr. Wayne Godwin (School of Art and Design), Ms. Marti Van Scott (Office of Technology Transfer), and Ms. Marty Hackney (Entrepreneurial Initiative)

Ethics, Global Health, & the Fundamental Causes of Disease

Faculty:  Dr. Daniel Goldberg (Department of Bioethics & Interdisciplinary Studies)

Fantastic Archeology: Distinguishing Myth from Reality

Faculty:  Dr. Charles Ewen (Department of Anthropology)

Leadership in the Professions: Foundations of Philosophy and Law

Faculty:  Dr. James Leroy Smith (Department of Philosophy) and Dr. Gregory Hassler (Department of Bioethics & Interdisciplinary Studies)

Living Green: The World between Technology and Humanity

Faculty: Dr. Michael Behm, Dr. Robert Chin (Department of Technology Systems), and Dr. Eric Connell (Department of Construction Management)

Middle Eastern Women's Voices in Love, War, Fact, & Fiction

Faculty:  Dr. Mona Russell (Department of History) and Dr. Rick Taylor (Department of English)

The Nobel Prize: A History of Genius, Controversy, and Prestige

Faculty:  Dr. Michael Bassman (Distinguished Honors Professor, The Honors College)

Pilgrimage in Various Cultural and Temporal Settings

Faculty:  Dr. Jelena Bogdanović and Dr. Jessica Christie (Department of Art History)

Science and Society in the Age of Genomics

Faculty: Dr. Jean-Luc Scemama and Dr. John Stiller (Department of Biology)

Think Chronically: From McDonalds to Dialysis- Exploring Solutions to Eastern North Carolina's Healthcare Challenges

Faculty: Dr. Paul Bolin and Dr. Cynthia Christiano (Department of Internal Medicine, Division of Nephrology and Hypertension)

Under the Microscope of Art: Creative Problem-Solving in the Health Sciences

Faculty:  Ms. Susan Meggs (Department of Interior Design & Merchandising) and Dr. Annette Greer (Department of Bioethics & Interdisciplinary Studies)

Wilderness Writing

Faculty: Dr. Ashley Egan (Department of Biology) and Dr. Stephanie West-Puckett (Department of English)

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