Coastal Water Resources Center
Institute for Coastal Science and Policy
beaufort co panoramic-resized

Beaufort County waterfront panoramic view of the Tar-Pamlico system.

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News

The Coastal Water Resources Center will host a Water Resources Seminar in Spring 2014. 

CLICK HERE to view the schedule.


2014 Southeast Stream Restoration Conference, EcoStream

November 17-20, 2014 | Charlotte, NC

CLICK HERE for more information.

 

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Coastal Water Resources Center


East Carolina University



The Coastal Water Resources Center (CWRC), within the Institute for Coastal Science and Policy at East Carolina University (ECU), is an interdisciplinary team committed to maintaining and improving the quantity and quality of water resources of the Coastal Plain of Eastern North Carolina.  Working with ECU researchers and water professionals, the center supports applied research to develop usable strategies that address scientific, economic, social and political issues specific to water resources in the North Carolina Coastal Plain.

Program


The Certificate in Hydrogeology and Environmental Geology program prepares students for employment and future studies in the environmental field. 


CWRC Related Courses


 


ANTHROPOLOGY


2005. Environmental Anthropology (3) FC:SO) Human adaptation to different environments from prehistoric to modern times.


BIOLOGY

1060. Environmental Biology (4) (F,S,SS) (FC:SC)May not count toward BIOL major or minor. Interrelationships of organisms with each other and with their environment and human factors. Basic ecological problems, principles, and solutions.

1061. Environmental Biology Laboratory (1) (F,S) (FC:SC)1 3-hour lab or field excursion per week. May not count toward BIOL major or minor. Optional lab or field course offered to provide a more in-depth look at habitats.

4320. Ecological Responses to Global Climate Change (3) (S)P: BIOL 2250, 2251. Theory and practical examination of effects of climate change. Predicted and present environmental influences ecosystems, communities, populations and organisms.

4300, 4301. Ecosystem Ecology (4,0) (WI) (F)P: BIOL 2250, 2251. In-depth examination of ecosystem processes. Primary production, decomposition, and nutrient cycling as influenced bybiotic and environmental controls in terrestrial, aquatic, and wetland ecosystems.

5220, 5221. Limnology (4,0)3 lectures and 1 3-hour lab per week. P: BIOL 2250, 2251; or consent of instructor. Physical, chemical, and biological factors of inland waters andtheir influence on aquatic organisms.

5400. Wetland Ecology and Management (3)P: BIOL 2250, 2251; or consent of instructor. Marshes, swamps, bogs, fens, and other intermittently flooded ecosystems. Emphasis onclassification, ecosystem processes, structure, and management of freshwater and saltwater wetlands.

5401. Wetland Ecology Laboratory (1)P: BIOL 2250, 2251; C: BIOL 5400. Application of methods to measure ecological properties, assess the functioning, identify plant communities,and understand landscape interaction of wetland ecosystems.

5750, 5751. Introduction to Regional Field Ecology (2,0) (5750:WI) For science and environmental studies teachers. 20 hours of lecture and 32 hours of field trips. May not count toward MS in BIOL or molecularbiology/biotechnology. Major regional ecosystems.
 

COASTAL AND MARINE STUDIES

2150, 2151. Boating Skills and Seamanship (1,1)C for 2150: COAS 2151; C for 2151: COAS 2150. Knowledge and skills needed to safely use a smalboat, following the United States Coast Guard Auxiliary standards.

4000. Scientific Diving and Underwater Research Techniques (3) (F, S)P: Basic SCUBA certification (or equivalent) and consent of instructor. Fundamentals of scientific diving, including the use of Nitrox, specializeddiving equipment, emergency procedures, sampling techniques, and the history and policies related to scientific diving. Fee required.

4001. Scientific Diving and Underwater Research Techniques Lab (1) (S)2 pool hours per week. P: Basic SCUBA certification (or equivalent) and consent of instructor. P/C: COAS 4000. Required confined water trainingfor scientific diver certification.

4002. Scientific Diver Qualification (1) (SS) P: Basic SCUBA certification (or equivalent), COAS 4000, 4001 (or equivalent), and consent of instructor. Required openwater training for scientific diver certification. Successful completion of this qualification, associated course, and lab may be used to meet American Academy ofUnderwater Sciences (AAUS) and ECU scientific diver certification requirements.

5000. Scientific Diving and Underwater Research Techniques (5)4 lecture and 2 lab hours per week. P: Consent of instructor. Fundamentals of scientific diving, including the use of Nitrox, specialized diving equipment, emergency procedures, sampling techniques, and a review of basic scuba diving skills.


CONSTRUCTION MANAGEMENT

3800, 3801. Soils and Foundations (3,0) Formerly CMGT 3766, 37672 lecture and 2 lab hours per week. P: Minimum grade of C (2.0) in CMGT 2600; minimum overall GPA of 2.0; GEOL 1500, 1501; MATH 1074 or1075 or equivalent; PHYS 1250, 1251. Fundamentals of soil mechanics as related to soil classification and construction of earthwork and foundations.

3700, 3701. Construction Surveying (3,0) Formerly CMGT 3666, 36672 lecture and 3 lab hours per week. P: Minimum grade of C (2.0) in CMGT 2600; minimum overall GPA of 2.0; MATH 1074 or 1075 or equivalent.Construction aspects of surveying with field and classroom exercises in use of transit, level, tape, and related surveying equipment. Problemsand exercises in traverse closure and pipeline, grading, street, curve, and building layout.
 

ECONOMICS

3855. Environmental Economics (3)P: ECON 2133. Application of microeconomic analysis to environmental problems such as air and water pollution and formation of environmentalpolicy.

4850. Resource Economics (3)P: ECON 2133, 3144. Applies microeconomic analysis and benefit-cost analysis to problems of allocation of natural resources.

5170. Resources I (3)P for undergraduate students: ECON 3144. Applies microeconomic analysis to study of allocation of natural resources.
 

ENGINEERING

3012. Thermal and Fluid Systems (4)3 lecture and 2 lab hours per week. P: ENGR 2450 with minimum grade of C (2.0); MATH 2153. Explores systems approach to design, analysis,and engineering of thermal and fluid systems using mathematical and software tools.


ENGLISH

3660. Representing Environmental Crisis (3) (WI)P: ENGL 1200. Introduction to discursive and narrative representations of environmental crisis in various texts.

3820. Scientific Writing (3) (WI) (F,S)P: ENGL 1200. Practice in assimilation and written presentation of scientific information.


ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH

2110, 2111. Introduction to Environmental Health Sciences and Laboratory (3,0) (F,S) 2 lecture and 2 lab hours per week. Principles of environmental health practices along with lab and field techniques. Emphasis on air quality, safe  water, food safety, industrial hygiene, radiation, vectors, and solid and hazardous waste disposal.

3060, 3061. Environmental Issues in Construction (4,0) (F,S)3 lecture and 2 lab hours per week P: GEOL 1500, 1501. Comprehensive overview of environmental impact of construction processes, includinglegislative and regulatory requirements.

3350. Safe Water (4) (F)P: BIOL 2110, 2111; CHEM 1160, 1161; C: EHST 3351. Fundamentals of safe water and principles of drinking water treatment and supply

3351. Safe Water Laboratory (1) (F)P: BIOL 2110, 2111; CHEM 1160, 1161; C: EHST 3350. Practical aspects of drinking water treatment and supply.

3370. Waste Water Management (3) (S)P: EHST 3350, 3351; C: EHST 3371. Fundamentals of waste water production, collection, treatment, and safe disposal.

3371. Waste Water Management Laboratory (1) (S)P: EHST 3350, 3351; C: EHST 3370. Practical aspects of waste water characteristics and safe disposal.

4010. Toxicological Foundations of Risk Assessment (3) (S)P: BIOL 2130; CHEM 2650, 2651. Undesirable biological responses to physical and chemical agents. Mechanisms of action at the molecular,cellular, and organ levels.

4200. Environmental Health Management and Law (3) (WI) (S)P: EHST major or minor. Processes involved in planning, facilitating, executing, evaluating, and controlling environmental health services.

5010, 5011. Principles of Toxicology and Laboratory (3,1)For EHST majors but other majors accepted. P: Senior or graduate standing; 8 s.h. of general chemistry; 6 s.h. of biology, including BIOL 2130;or consent of instructor. Basics of toxicology such as physiological response and environmental sources as well as specifics of major toxins.

5020. Environmental Toxicology (3)P: EHST 5010, 5011; or consent of instructor. Effect of anthropogenic and naturally occurring toxins on environment. Toxin sources, distribution,and bioaccumulation. Covers pesticides, metals, solvents, radioactive isotopes, food additives, air pollutants, and natural plant/animal toxins.

5800, 5801. Solid and Hazardous Waste Management and Laboratory (3,0)2 lecture and 2 lab hours per week. P: CHEM 1160, 1161 or consent of instructor. Problems associated with collection, treatment, and disposal ofmunicipal solid waste and hazardous wastes in the United States.


GEOGRAPHY

1250. The Water Planet (3) (F,S) (FC:SO)Importance of water in natural world. Cultural, economic, and legal issues associated with human uses of water.

1300. Weather and Climate (4) (F,S,SS) (FC:SC)Introductory survey of meteorology including weather and climate principles, processes, and patterns, at a variety of scales from local to global.

2300. Geography of Environmental Resources (3) (F)May not count toward foundations curriculum social sciences requirement. Location and development of environmental resources at world andnational levels.

2350. Climate Change: Science and Society (3) (FC:SO)Explores societal aspects of climate change science, relevant social science debates, human adaptation, mitigation strategies, and international policy.

2400. Spatial Data Analysis (3) (F,S)May not count toward foundations curriculum social sciences requirement. Foundation for data management and analysis in geographicinformation science. Introduces quantitative expressions common to geographic information science and descriptive and inferential spatialstatistics.

2410. Fundamentals of GIS (3) (F,S) Formerly GEOG 3410.May not count toward foundations curriculum social sciences requirement. Foundations for understanding and using geographical informationsystems. Emphasis on creation, visualization, and analysis of geographically referenced data.

2500. Map and Aerial Photo Interpretation (3) (F,S,SS)4 lecture hours per week. May not count toward foundations curriculum social sciences requirement. Principles of map reading and aerial photointerpretation as information sources on natural and manmade environment.

3220. Soil Properties, Surveys, and Applications (3) (F)Saturday field trip may be required. P: GEOG 2250. Physical and chemical properties of soil, soil-water relationships, soil-forming factors, countysoil reports, and soil applications that involve land management decisions.

3230. Global Climates (3) (S)May not count toward foundations curriculum social sciences requirement. P: GEOG 1300; MATH 1065; or consent of instructor. Variation in globalclimates as related to atmospheric circulation patterns and processes.

3250. Environmental Hazards (3) (F)May not count toward foundations curriculum social sciences requirement. P: GEOG 1300 or 2250. Various ways people and governments respondto natural and human-induced extreme events, human behavior in threatening or actual hazards, and public policies and programs designed tocontrol or alleviate hazards.

3420. Remote Sensing of the Environment I (3) (F)May not count toward foundations curriculum social sciences requirement. P: GEOG 2410 or equivalent. Basic understanding of digital image dataand tools required to process, analyze, and interpret digital images.

3430. Geographic Information Systems I (3) (F,S)May not count toward foundations curriculum social sciences requirement. P: GEOG 2410 or equivalent. Computer-based decision supportsystems. Involves integration of spatially referenced data in problem-solving context. Concepts and application of GIS include data capture,storage, analysis, and display.

3450. Introduction to the Global Positioning System (3) (S)May not count toward foundations curriculum social sciences requirement. P: GEOG 2410 or equivalent. Techniques for spatial referencing via asatellite-based navigation system.

3460. GIS Applications Programming (3) (F)May not count toward foundations curriculum social sciences requirement. P: GEOG 2410; BITE 2212 or CSCI 1610 or MIS 2223 or consent ofinstructor. Introduces GIS applications design, development, and deployment. Focuses on custom mapping user interfaces; programmablesolutions for spatial data display, analysis and manipulation; and custom GIS applications development.

3510. Physical Meteorology (3) (F)May not count toward foundations curriculum social sciences requirement. P: GEOG 1300; MATH 1065; or consent of instructor. Basic principles ofatmospheric hydrostatics, thermodynamics, cloud and precipitation processes, and radiative transfer.

3520. Dynamic Meteorology (3) (S)May not count toward foundations curriculum social sciences requirement. P: GEOG 1300; MATH 2172, PHYS 2360; or consent of instructor. 3lecture hours per week. Basic concepts and techniques of mathematics, thermodynamics, mechanics and fluid dynamics in the study ofatmospheric motions and weather systems.

3550. Principles of Synoptic Meteorology (3) (F)P: GEOG 3520; or consent of instructor. Basic concepts of synoptic scale atmospheric phenomena, including upper level waves and mid-latitudeweather systems.

4210. Fluvial and Hydrological Processes (3) (S)May not count toward foundations curriculum social sciences requirement. P: GEOG 1300, 2250; or consent of instructor. Comprehensiveexamination of principles of surface water hydrology and fluvial geomorphology. Application of principles to environmental problems.

6210. Advanced Fluvial and Hydrological Processes (3)Comprehensive examination of principles of surface water hydrology and fluvial geomorphology and their application to environmental problems.

6230. Earth Surface Processes on the Coastal Plain (3)Detailed examination of the dominant geomorphic processes and sediment dynamics involved in the creation of landforms and the redistributionof sediments and contaminants in coastal plain environments. Emphasis on laboratory experimentation.

6270. Advanced Water Resources Management and Planning (3) Same as PLAN 6270Advanced investigation of spatial and temporal characteristics of water. Consideration of hydrologic, engineering, economic, and institutionalaspects of water management.

6420. Advanced Remote Sensing (3)P: GEOG 3420 or consent of instructor. Interpretation of environmental phenomena recorded in digital data formats by remote sensinginstruments. Advanced techniques of digital image processing for remotely sensed images.

6430. Advanced Geographic Information Systems (3)P: GEOG 3430 or consent of instructor. Advanced topics.

6440. Spatial Analysis of Coastal Environments (3)P: GEOG 3410 or equivalent. Applications of geographic information science to research in coastal environments.

6460. Advanced Digital Terrain Analysis (3)P: GEOG 2410 or equivalent; or consent of instructor. Advanced investigation of digital topographic analyses that focuses on topographic dataacquisition, development of digital elevation models, topographic analyses, and terrain visualization.

6491, 6492, 6493. Independent Study in Geographic Techniques (1,2,3)May be repeated for maximum of 6 s.h. P: Consent of instructor. Analysis of specific problem in geographic techniques under direct supervisionof graduate faculty member.

6510. Meteorological Measurement Systems (3)2 lecture and 3 lab hours per week. Principles of meteorological instruments and measurement techniques; basic and advanced methods in datalogging, processing, quality analysis and quality control; hands-on experience in labs, and practical training via independent field project.

6520. Atmosphere Turbulence (3)Mechanisms and characterization of atmospheric turbulence in terms of fluid dynamics and mathematical methods. Modeling and measurementtechniques in study of atmospheric turbulence.

6530. Advanced Micrometeorology (3)Advanced measurement and modeling techniques and their use in micrometeorological research; estimation of exchange of momentum, massand energy between Earth’s surface and lowest atmosphere, and their representation in large-scale meteorological models.

6540. Advanced Coastal Storms (3)Advanced dynamics, analysis, and forecasting of extratropical and tropical storms. History of storms in the Carolinas and current mitigation plans.

6550. Synoptic Meteorology and Forecasting (3) (S)Analysis and forecasting of mid-latitude weather systems as characterized by large-scale dynamics. Includes advanced techniques of weatheranalysis, map interpretation, and satellite and radar analysis.

6560. Applied Urban Climatology (3) (F)Impact of urbanization upon atmospheric processes, including energetic balance, precipitation, atmospheric circulation, and pollution.

6570. Advanced Hydrometeorology (3)Theory of atmospheric processes related to surface hydrology. Measurement, prediction, and climate analysis techniques of hydrometeorologicalvariables and associated weather and hydrologic events.

6580. Advanced Radar and Satellite Meteorology (3)P: Consent of instructor. Theoretical basis for weather observations with radar and satellite instruments.

6590. Advanced Tropical Meteorology (3)P: Consent of instructor. Tropical atmosphere as key component of global weather and climate and climate prediction.


GEOLOGICAL SCIENCES

3209. Environmental Forensics (3)P: CHEM 1150, 1151, 1160, 1161; or equivalent; or consent of instructor. Identification of environmental pollutants, estimation of their source(s),  quantification of how long the pollution has persisted, and assessment of human health and ecosystem exposure. Investigation of commonenvironmental contamination within air, water, soil, groundwater, sediments, and biota.

3500. Hydrogeology and the Environment (3)Hydrogeology with emphasis on environmental water resources issues.

5150. The Geologic Component of Environmental Science (3)P: Introductory GEOL course or consent of instructor. Basic geologic knowledge and insights that support sound, rational, and science basedenvironmental decisions and policies in regard to land and water use. Topics include pollution abatement, clean up, and prevention; resourceextraction, use, and conservation; and hazardous geologic processes

5450. Introduction to Aqueous Geochemistry (3)2 lectures and 1 3-hour lab per week. P: CHEM 1150, 1151, 1160, 1161; or equivalent. Application of chemical principles to study of elements atearth’s surface; their transportation in aqueous solutions; and weathering, groundwater, and surface water chemistry, geochemical cycles, anddistribution of stable isotopes.

5700, 5701. Geohydrology of Drainage Basins (3,0)2 lectures and 1 3-hour lab per week. P: GEOL 1500, 1501; or consent of instructor. Drainage basin geology and hydrology. Emphasis onquantitative analysis, evaporation, streamflow, and hydrologic parameters of surface water and ground water basins.

5710, 5711. Ground Water Hydrology (3,0)2 lectures and 1 3-hour lab per week. P: GEOL 1500, 1501; or consent of instructor. Origin, occurrence, movement, quality, regional analysis,and management of ground water. Interrelationship of ground and surface water. Lab emphasis on aquifer test data collection and interpretation.

6550, 6551. Principles of Geophysics (3,0)2 lectures and 1 3-hour lab per week. P: GEOL 3300, 3301; PHYS 1250, 1260 or equivalent. Seismology, gravity, rock magnetism, and heat flowas applied to earth. Emphasis on relationships between large scale features of earth and their geophysical characteristics. Lab introducesgeophysical instrumentation, data processing, and interpretation.

7600, 7601. Remote Sensing of Coastal Environments (4,0)2 lectures and 1 lab per week. P: Consent of instructor. Application of optical remote sensing to examinations of material transport within andbetween coupled land – ocean systems. Introduces image processing and analysis, integration of field measurement technologies and algorithmdevelopment. Emphasis is on the use of remote sensing as a research and decision-making tool.

7710, 7711. Groundwater Modeling (4,0)3 lectures and 1 3-hour lab per week. P: GEOL 5710, 5711; or consent of instructor. Principles and procedures for numerical modeling focusing ondesign and practical applications of groundwater models in hydrogeology.

7910. Sediment Transport and Depositional Processes (4)P: GEOL 4010 or consent of instructor. Examines processes involved in transport and deposition of sediment. Focus on fundamental principles andhow they apply to active processes, recent sediment, and environmental applications.

7920, 7921. Advanced Surface Water/Groundwater Hydrology (4,0)P: GEOL 5710, 5711; or consent of instructor. Advanced hydrologic topics with emphasis on computer applications and modeling. Evaluatessteady-state and nonsteady-state models and applied aspects of hydrology related to management of water resources.

7830. Principles of Biogeochemical Interactions (3) Formerly GEOL 6830P: CHEM 1160. General introduction to life’s effects on chemistry of Earth’s surface. Examines interactions between atmosphere, land surface,and oceans. Stresses human impact on global environmental chemistry.
 

MECHANICAL ENGINEERING

4150. Fluid Mechanics (4) 3 lecture and 2 lab hours per weekP: ENGR 2450 with minimum grade of C (2.0); MATH 2154. Fluid systems including fluid statics; conservation of mass, momentum, and energy;incompressible inviscid flow; similitude; internal and external incompressible viscous flow; and fluid machinery.


PLANNING

5045. Environmental Resources Planning and Management (3)P: PLAN 3010 or equivalent or consent of instructor. Frame of reference for studying natural resources for purpose of development.

5065. Land Use Planning (3)2 lecture and 2 lab hours per week. Social, economic, physical, and environmental aspects of urban land use and planning. Other tools foreffective planning.

6003. Design For The Built Environment (3) (F)Urban design theories, tools and determinants of urban form.

6029. Research in Environmental Planning (3)P: PLAN 6020; consent of instructor. Specific problem in environmental planning and management under direct supervision of planning graduatefaculty member.

6270. Advanced Water Resources Management and Planning (3)Same as GEOG 6270. Advanced investigation of spatial and temporal characteristics of water. Consideration of hydrologic, engineering,economic, and institutional aspects of water management.
 

POLITICAL SCIENCE

3256. Environmental Politics (3)Energy and environmental policies, especially governmental responses to conflicting goals of clean environment and energy sufficiency.
 

RECREATION AND LEISURE STUDIES

2600. Outdoor Recreation Activities (3)Knowledge and skills related to outdoor recreation activities for lifetime leisure skill development. Choose two areas: backpacking, sea kayaking,whitewater kayaking, caving, surfing, or canoeing. Three field trips required. Requires additional fees. May be repeated up to 6 s.h. with differentskills areas by permission of instructor.

5100. Aquatic Facility Management (3)Operation, maintenance, and management of aquatic facilities used for recreation, exercise, therapy, competition, education programs, and otheraquatic-related programs.
 

SCIENCE EDUCATION

3280. Life and Environmental Science Grades K-6 (3)Life and environmental science content, investigations, conceptual development and reasoning appropriate for K-6 level students.

3290. Earth Systems Science Grades K-6 (3)Earth systems science content, investigations, conceptual development and reasoning appropriate for K-6 level students.

3602. Investigations in Physical and Earth Science (4) (F,S,SS)Two 2-hour lectures/labs per week. Series of selected topics and investigations in physical and earth sciences. Science concepts treated in depth.Emphasis on role of investigative approach.

3604. Investigations in Life and Environmental Science (4) (F,S,SS)Two 2-hour lectures/labs per week. Development of skills in utilizing living organisms and school yard environment to provide learningexperiences for children.
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