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Division of Academic Affairs
Undergraduate Catalog 2012-13


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Undergraduate Courses


A B C D E F G H I J L M N O P R S T W
 
 

ECON: Economics

2113. Principles of Microeconomics (3) (F,S,SS) (FC:SO)
Elements of microeconomics and introduction to macroeconomics.
2133. Principles of Macroeconomics (3) (F,S,SS) (FC:SO)
P: ECON 2113. Principles and applications of macroeconomics from Keynesian and Montarist approaches.
3030. Antitrust and Regulation (3) (WI*) (F)
P: ECON 2113. Antitrust policy and government regulation as a response to market failure.
3144. Intermediate Microeconomics (3) (F,S)
P: ECON 2113. Demand analysis, elasticity, market structure, pricing, and cost effectiveness.
3244. Intermediate Macroeconomics (3) (F,S)
P: ECON 2133. Classical, Keynesian, and modern analysis of determinants of national income, employment, and price levels.
3323. Topics in Economics (3) (WI*)
May be repeated for credit with change of topic. P: ECON 2133. Consideration of new and advanced topics in economics.
3343. Econometrics (3) (WI) (F,S)
P: CSCI 2600 or MIS 2223; ECON 2133; MATH 2283. Development and explanation of econometric methods and model building.
3353. Development Economics (3)
P: ECON 2133. Analysis of problems of less developed countries of the world. National and international policies of such countries.
3365. Russian Economic Transition (3) (S)
P: ECON 2113, 2133, or permission of instructor. Analysis of the rise and fall of Russian Soviet economic system and its transformation into a market economic system, with focus on economic institutions and their functions.
3420. Money and Banking (3) (S)
P: ECON 2133. Banking system, Federal Reserve System, monetary theory, monetary policy in US, and international monetary relations.
3630. Health Economics (3) (WI*) (S)
P: ECON 2133. Organizational structure, financing, and regulation of health care delivery and economic measurement of performance.
3750. Economics of Poverty and Discrimination (3) (WI*)
P: ECON 2133. Economic theories of discrimination and occupational segregation. Analysis of inequalities in earnings distribution. Implications for public policy.
3855. Environmental Economics (3)
P: ECON 2133. Application of microeconomic analysis to environmental problems such as air and water pollution and formation of environmental policy.
3960. Economics of Public Choice (3) (F)
P: ECON 2133. Application of microeconomic analysis to study political decision making within a representative democracy.
4020. Industrial Organization (3) (WI*) (S)
P: ECON 3144. Definition and measurement of structure, behavior, and market performance of firms.
4214. Public Finance (3)
P: ECON 2133, 3144. Government expenditures, revenue and debts, allocation of resources, and distribution of income.
4230. Labor in Economics (3) (F)
P: ECON 3144. Analysis of labor market operations and occupational choice and discrimination from institutional and human capital perspectives.
4373. International Trade (3) (S)
P: ECON 2133, 3144. Theory and application in world markets for primary and industrial goods.
4430. Business Cycles and Forecasting (3)
P: ECON 3244, 3343; or consent of instructor. Business cycle theories and quantitative techniques for analyzing and predicting business cycle phenomena.
4521, 4522, 4523. Independent Study and Research in Economics (1,2,3) (4523: WI*) (F,S,SS)
P: Consent of instructor and chair. Extensive or selected readings taken from modern economic research monographs or in specialized areas of economics in which student has taken one or more courses.
4550. Honors I (3) (F,S)
Open only to ECON majors who are eligible to participate in the honors program. P: ECON 3144, 3244. Varying topics developed in cooperation with supervising instructor.
4551. Honors II (3) (F,S)
P: ECON 4550 with a minimum grade of B (3.0). Varying topics developed in cooperation with supervising instructor.
4850. Resource Economics (3)
P: ECON 2133, 3144. Applies microeconomic analysis and benefit-cost analysis to problems of allocation of natural resources.
5000. General Topics (3)
May be repeated for credit with change of topic. P for undergraduate students: ECON 3144, 3244. Consideration of new or advanced topics in economics.
5150. Development (3)
P for undergraduate students: ECON 3144. Applies microeconomic analysis to investments in human resources, efficient organization of rural economics, intersectoral and international exchange, and interaction between politics and markets, especially in less developed countries.
5170. Resources I (3)
P for undergraduate students: ECON 3144. Applies microeconomic analysis to study of allocation of natural resources.
5360. Mathematical Economics (3)
P for undergraduate students: MATH 2171 or equivalent. Mathematical analysis applied to economic theory. Structure and specification of quantitative models.
5501. Macroeconomic Theory (3)
P for undergraduate students: ECON 3244; ECON 5360 or MATH 2172. Business cycle fluctuations. Emphasis on determinants of consumption and investment and effectiveness of monetary and fiscal policy.
5800. Public Economics (3)
P for undergraduate students: ECON 3144. Application of microeconomic analysis to collective choice in democratic societies, government expenditure programs, and taxation.
5910. Health Economics (3)
P for undergraduate students: ECON 3144, 3244. Organization structure, financing, and regulation of health care delivery and economic measurement of performance.
ECON Banked Courses
1000. General Economics (3)
2250. Introduction to Econometrics (3)
3363. Comparative Economics Systems (3)
3520. Mathematical Economics (3)
4024. Regional Development (3)
4740. Urban and Regional Economics (3)

EDTC: Educational Technology

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2240. Virtual Reality: Introduction and Basic Applications (3) (F,S,SS)
2 lecture and 2 lab hours per week. P: Basic knowledge of computer operations. Basic applications of virtual reality in education and other fields. Students select special projects according to their interests.
3242. Graphics-Based Virtual Environments I (3) (S)
2 lecture and 2 lab hours per week. P: EDTC 2240 or consent of dept chair. Intermediate design, building, applications, and evaluation of graphics-based virtual environments for specific applications.
3243. Graphics-Based Virtual Environments II (3) (S)
2 lecture and 2 lab hours per week. P: EDTC 3242 or consent of instructor. Advanced design, building, applications, and evaluation of graphics-based virtual environments for specific applications.
3244. Virtual Reality in Education (3) (F)
2 lecture and 2 lab hours per week. P: EDTC 2240 or consent of instructor. Role of virtual reality as instructional tool. Types, applications, and hardware and software.
3245. Text-Based Virtual Environments (3) (F)
2 lecture and 2 lab hours per week. P: EDTC 2240 or consent of instructor. Design, building, applications, and evaluation of applications of text-based virtual environments.
3901, 3902, 3903, 3904. Special Topics (1,2,3,4)
May be repeated for maximum of 9 s.h. with change of topic. P: Consent of instructor. Selected topics in educational technology. Variety of newly developed and special courses.
4001. Technology in Education (2) (F,S,SS)
P: BITE 2000 or BITE 2000 bypass exam or BITE 2112 or MIS 2223 or other Council for Teacher Education approved technology course. Information literacy, media, and technology integration skills for professional and instructional use in instructional design, video applications, and digital applications.
4246. Interactive Three-Dimensional Internet Applications (3) (S)
2 lecture and 2 lab hours per week P: EDTC 2240 and working knowledge of HTML or consent of instructor. Design and construction of interactive three dimensional Internet applications. Uses tools such as VRML.
4900. Seminar on Virtual Reality (3) (S)
P: 16 s.h. in virtual reality courses or consent of instructor. Problems and issues affecting building, use, and evaluation of virtual environments.
4981, 4982, 4983. Directed Independent Study (1,2,3) (F,S,SS)
For intermediate or advanced student. May be repeated for maximum of 6 s.h. P: Consent of dept chair. Study of topic not otherwise offered in curriculum or topic beyond or in greater depth than is possible within the context of regular course.
4991, 4992. Internship Seminar (3,3) (F,S,SS)
1 lecture and 10 lab hours per week and 140 hours of observation and practical experience in a professional setting. Periodic group meetings with instructor and other interns. P: 16 s.h. in virtual reality courses or consent of instructor.
5010. Computers in Education (3)
Application of computers in education. Operation of microcomputers and selection, evaluation, and application of educational software.
EDTC Banked Courses
3271. Introduction to Educational Media (1)
3272. Introduction to Audiovisual Instruction Materials and Techniques (2)
3700. Technologies in Education (3)

EDUC: Education

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2001, 2002, 2003. Trends and Issues in Education (1,2,3) (F,S,SS)
P: Consent of chair or program coordinator. May be repeated for maximum of 6 s.h. May not substitute for required courses. Individualized study of problems or issues in pertinent areas of education.
3002. Introduction to Diversity (3)
Examines how historical and socially constructed beliefs and values impact our perceptions of diversity within and outside of public education institutions and how those perceptions shape domestic and global decisions and actions at the levels of both policy and practice.
3200. Foundations of American Education (3) (WI) (F,S,SS)
P: Early experience course or consent of instructor. Develops students' civic and leadership capacities as reflective professionals and advocates for the improvement of public schools and their service to all learners. Examines the social, political, historical, philosophical, legal, ethical, and pedagogical / curricular foundations of American education and contemporary educational policy.
4400. Foundations of School Learning, Motivation, and Assessment (3) (F,S)
P: Admission to upper division; C: Senior I semester. Theories of learning, motivation, and assessment providing a foundation for understanding the classroom as an instructional system.
4551, 4552, 4553. Trends and Issues in Education (1,2,3) (F,S,SS)
May be repeated for maximum of 6 s.h. May not substitute for required courses. P: Admission to upper division; consent of instructor. Individualized study of problems or issues in pertinent areas of education.
5001. Education in a Global Perspective (3)
Comparative study of selected national educational systems, curricula, teacher preparatory programs, evaluation systems, and current issues within context of global realities, demands, and needs.
5002. Foundations of Multicultural Education (3)
Aspects of teaching that view cultural differences as educational assets.

EENG: Electrical Engineering

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2410. Digital Electronics (3) Same as CSCI 2410
P: ENGR 1014 or 1016 and 2050; or CSCI 2310, 2311. Introduction to digital logic and digital electronics, including Boolean algebra, number systems, logic gates, data structures, and both combinational and sequential logical design and optimization.
3020. Signals and Systems (3)
P: ENGR 2514; MATH 2154. Singularity functions, properties of LTI systems, and differential and difference equation representation of physical systems. Convolution, Fourier series, Fourier Transforms, Laplace transforms, and z-transforms. Applications in sampling, modulation, filtering, and digital signal processing, with relevant examples in electrical, mechanical, and biomedical engineering.
3040. Microprocessors (4) Same as CSCI 3040
3 lecture and 2 lab hours per week. P: ENGR 2514, EENG 2410 or CSCI 2410; or consent of instructor. Microprocessor architecture and programming, register level logic, input and output, system logic, timing, embedded systems applications, and hardware interfacing.
3530. Electronics (3)
P: ENGR 2514. Fundamentals of operational amplifiers and common topologies; PN junctions, semiconductor physics, the ideal diode, and real diodes; bipolar junction transistors (BJTs) and metal oxidized silicon field-effect transistors (MOSFETs): physical structures, signal models, common configurations, and second-order effects.
3750. Electric Power Systems (3)
P: ENGR 2514. Alternating current (AC) systems, single-phase and three-phase systems, transformers, electric machinery, electric power generation, transmission lines, and power system faults.
4510. Advanced Controls (3)
P: EENG 3020; ENGR 3050. Difference equations and Z-transforms; sampling of continuous-time systems; transfer functions in Z-domain and discrete-time system models; control system performance and stability analysis in Z-domain; digital-controller design and implementation.

EHST: Environmental Health

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2110, 2111. Introduction to Environmental Health Sciences and Laboratory (3,0) (F,S) 2 lecture and 2 lab hours per week.
Principles of environmental health practices along with lab and field techniques. Emphasis on air quality, safe water, food safety, industrial hygiene, radiation, vectors, and solid and hazardous waste disposal.
3000. Environmental Health Practice Seminar (1) (S)
2 classroom or lab hours per week P: Major or intended major in EHST. Variety of environmental health practice settings in government, industry, and elsewhere.
3003. Environmental Epidemiology (3) (F)
Science of epidemiology and biostatistics required to understand epidemiological studies. Topics include longitudinal and case control studies; risk and relative risk; collection, tabulation, and analysis of data.
3060, 3061. Environmental Issues in Construction (4,0) (F,S)
3 lecture and 2 lab hours per week P: GEOL 1500, 1501. Comprehensive overview of environmental impact of construction processes, including legislative and regulatory requirements.
3200. Food Sanitation Principles (3) (S)
P: Consent of instructor; C: EHST 3201. Food composition, engineering principles, processing and preservation methods, food-borne diseases, and food regulatory programs.
3201. Food Sanitation Principles Laboratory (1) (S)
3 lab hours per week. P: Consent of instructor; C: EHST 3200. Practical experience in procedures for evaluating food, milk products, and sanitizing agents.
3350. Safe Water (4) (F)
P: BIOL 2110, 2111; CHEM 1160, 1161; C: EHST 3351. Fundamentals of safe water and principles of drinking water treatment and supply
3351. Safe Water Laboratory (1) (F)
P: BIOL 2110, 2111; CHEM 1160, 1161; C: EHST 3350. Practical aspects of drinking water treatment and supply.
3370. Waste Water Management (3) (S)
P: EHST 3350, 3351; C: EHST 3371. Fundamentals of waste water production, collection, treatment, and safe disposal.
3371. Waste Water Management Laboratory (1) (S)
P: EHST 3350, 3351; C: EHST 3370. Practical aspects of waste water characteristics and safe disposal.
3500, 3501, 3502. Problems in Environmental Health (1,2,3) (F,S)
Hours required vary with individual student assignment and/or project. 14 classroom hours for 1 s.h. credit. P: EHST major. Specific topic, area, or problem not adequately covered in current curriculum.
3600. Air Pollution (3) (F)
P: EHST 2110 or consent of instructor. Evaluation and monitoring of air pollutants, effects of air pollutants, survey of control procedures and legislation, and lab procedures in air quality investigations.
3700. Industrial Hygiene (3) (S)
P: 8 s.h. of general science lab courses or consent of program director; C: EHST 3701. Health problems encountered in business, industrial, and other work places. Emphasis on recognition and evaluation of occupational stresses and disease prevention methods.
3701. Industrial Hygiene Laboratory (1) (S)
3 lab hours per week. P: Consent of instructor; C: EHST 3700. Practical experience and methods for evaluating work environment.
3900. Introduction to Occupational Health (3) (F)
P: 6 s.h. in BIOL, including BIOL 2130; 8 s.h. of general CHEM; or consent of instructor. Occupational diseases in terms of occupational health hazards and associated health effects.
3910. Introduction to Injury Prevention (3) (F,S,SS)
Personal protection issues including injury prevention and mitigation.
3926. Construction Safety (3) (F,S)
Technical aspects of construction safety. Scaffolding, trenching and shoring, excavations, and building codes.
4010. Toxicological Foundations of Risk Assessment (3) (S)
P: BIOL 2130; CHEM 2650, 2651. Undesirable biological responses to physical and chemical agents. Mechanisms of action at the molecular, cellular, and organ levels.
4200. Environmental Health Management and Law (3) (WI) (S)
P: EHST major or minor. Processes involved in planning, facilitating, executing, evaluating, and controlling environmental health services.
4300, 4301. Institutional and Recreational Sanitation and Laboratory (3,0) (F)
2 lecture and 2 Lab hours per week. P: EHST 2110, 3003, 3200, 3201, 3350, 3351, 3370, 3371; or consent of instructor. Environmental Health practices and sanitation in institutions and recreational facilities. North Carolina Rules Governing the Sanitation of Institutions and Recreational Facilities are discussed and evaluated.
4350, 4351. Vector Borne Disease Ecology and Laboratory (3,0) (F)
2 lecture and 2 lab hours per week. P: EHST 2110, 3003, 3350, 3351, 3370, 3371; or consent of instructor. Introduction to vector borne diseases, their vectors and their ecology in humans and the environment.
4990. Environmental Health Internship (3) (F,S,SS)
120 hours of supervised learning experience in an approved clinical/environmental health facility. P: EHST major; minimum of 13 s.h. in EHST; or consent of program director.
4991. Environmental Health Internship (3) (F,S,SS)
120 hours of supervised learning experience in an approved clinical/environmental health facility. P: EHST major; minimum of 13 s.h. in EHST courses or consent of program director.
5001. Seminar in Environmental Health (1)
May be taken more than once. Student, staff, and guest speakers on current research.
5010, 5011. Principles of Toxicology and Laboratory (3,1)
For EHST majors but other majors accepted. P: Senior or graduate standing; 8 s.h. of general chemistry; 6 s.h. of biology, including BIOL 2130; or consent of instructor. Basics of toxicology such as physiological response and environmental sources as well as specifics of major toxins.
5020. Environmental Toxicology (3)
P: EHST 5010, 5011; or consent of instructor. Effect of anthropogenic and naturally occurring toxins on environment. Toxin sources, distribution, and bioaccumulation. Covers pesticides, metals, solvents, radioactive isotopes, food additives, air pollutants, and natural plant/animal toxins.
5164. Radiological Health Field Operation (1)
P: Consent of instructor. Field observation of radiological health physics, practices at nuclear fuel cycle facilities, and government nuclear facilities.
5165. Advanced Radiological Laboratory (1)
P: Consent of instructor. Intensive radiological lab training at Oak Ridge Associated Universities. Tour of research facilities.
5510. Physical Safety (2) (F)
Practical application of physical safety principles in living and work environments
5520. Biological Safety (2) (S) Formerly EHST 6120.
Practical application of biological safety principles in living and work environments.
5530. Chemical Safety (2) (S)
Practical application of chemical safety principles in living and work environments.
5540. Radiation Safety (2) (F)
Practical application of radiation safety principles in living and work environments
5800, 5801. Solid and Hazardous Waste Management and Laboratory (3,0)
2 lecture and 2 lab hours per week. P: CHEM 1160, 1161 or consent of instructor. Problems associated with collection, treatment, and disposal of municipal solid waste and hazardous wastes in the United States.
EHST Banked Courses
5710, 5711. Topics in Health Physics I (3,0)
5720, 5721. Topics in Health Physics II (3,0)

ELEM: Elementary Education

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2123. Early Experience for the Prospective Teacher (1) (F,S)
Minimum of 16 hours of focused observations and planned participation in appropriate school environments and 8 hours of seminar class instruction. P: Consent of instructor. Introduction to teaching for prospective elementary education teachers.
3000. Curriculum and Standards in Elementary School (3) (F,S,SS) Formerly ELEM 3275
P: Sophomore standing; P/C: ELEM 2123. Use of curriculum design and content standards in planning rigorous lessons for all individuals.
3100. Learning and Instruction in Elementary School (3) (F,S,SS) Formerly ELEM 3235
P: ELEM 2123; P/C: ELEM 3000. Emphasizes the relationship between learning theory and instructional practice.
3200. Language Arts in Elementary School (3) (WI) (F,S,SS) Formerly ELEM 3250
P: ELEM 2123, 3000. Emphasizes theory and practice in the teaching of language arts in early childhood and elementary grades.
3249. Literacy Development in Early Childhood (3) (F,S,SS)
3 lecture and 1 lab/studio hours per week. P: Admission to upper division. Language and literacy development of children birth through kindergarten. Emphasis on their impact on the young child's success in becoming a literate human being.
3300. K-2 Practicum (3) (F,S) Formerly ELEM 3236
P/C: ELEM 2123, 3100, 3200. Supervised teaching of groups of children in an elementary classroom.
3500. Teaching Social Studies in Elementary School (3) (WI) (F,S) Formerly ELEM 4550
P: Upper division standing, ELEM 3100,3200, 3300. Topics and issues related to teaching K-6 social studies for diverse elementary classroom settings.
3600. Grades 3-5 Practicum (2) (F,S) Formerly ELEM 4551
P: Upper division standing; ELEM 3100, 3200, 3300; P/C: ELEM 3500. Supervised teaching of groups of children in an elementary school classroom.
4300. Classroom Organization and Management in Elementary School (3) (F,S) Formerly ELEM 4525
P: Upper division standing; ELEM 3500, 3600. Topics and issues related to classroom management and organization.
4324. Internship in the Elementary School (10) (F,S)
P: Upper division standing; EDTC 4001; EDUC 4400 or PSYC 4305; ELEM 3000, 3100, 3200, 3300, 3500, 3600, 4300; MATE 3223; READ 3302; SCIE 3216; C: ELEM 4325, 4500. Full-time, semester-long internship in assigned elementary (K-6) classroom under direction of a master teacher and a university supervisor. Emphasis on teacher as decision maker in planning, implementing, and evaluating instruction.
4325. Internship Seminar: Issues in Elementary Education (1) (F,S)
P: Upper division standing; EDTC 4001; EDUC 4400 or PSYC 4305; ELEM 3000, 3100, 3200, 3300, 3500, 3600, 4300; MATE 3223; READ 3302; SCIE 3216; C: ELEM 4324, 4500. Reflective study of problems or issues in elementary education and concerns arising from internship experience.
4500. Practicum in Classroom Organization and Management (1) (F,S) Formerly ELEM 4526
P: Upper division standing; ELEM 4300; C: ELEM 4324, 4325. Examines the skills, dispositions, and content knowledge required of elementary teachers in contemporary schools.
4532, 4533, 4534. Problems in Education (1,1,1)
Each may be repeated once for maximum of 6 s.h. P: Consent of instructor and dept chair. Individualized study of problems in pertinent areas in education. No class meetings. Hours for conferences with the instructor to be arranged. Written paper on problem studied required for one hour of credit.
5306. Social Studies in the Elementary School (3) (F,S)
Social studies objectives implemented by study of programs, strategies, and materials.

ENED: English Education

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2123. Early Experiences for the Prospective Teacher (1) (F,S)
For prospective teachers. Minimum of 16 hours of directed observations and planned participation in appropriate school environments and 8 hours of seminar class instruction in the teaching area. May not count toward BA or minor for BA. May not count toward foundations curriculum humanities requirement. P: ENGL 1200. Introduction to teaching of English.
3018. Introduction to the High School English Curriculum (3) (F)
P: ENED 2123 or consent of chair. Emphasis on planning, instruction, and evaluation in secondary English. Design and organization of curriculum and differentiation for individual needs.
3815. Composition Instruction in Grades 9-12 (3) (WI) (S)
2 lecture and 1 practicum hour per week. P: ENED 2123 or consent of dept. Examines stages of composition process and strategies for teaching and evaluating modes of discourse specified by secondary school curriculum. Practice in application of strategies through tutorial work with secondary students.
4010. Assessment, Management and Instruction in High School English (3) (F)
P: Admission to upper-division; ENED 4960. Emphasis on assessing, learning, and managing the classroom for behaviors that maximize language arts skills and knowledge acquisition.
4319. Teaching English and Language Arts in the Middle Grades (3) (F)
May not count toward foundations curriculum humanities requirement or as an advanced elective for ENGL majors. P: Admission to upper-division; EDUC 3200; MIDG 3001, 3010, 3022; 10 s.h. in ENGL; C: MIDG 4010; HIED or MATE or SCIE 4319. Curriculum design and methods of teaching language arts in grades 6-9. Practicum required.
4323. The Teaching of English in High School (3) (F)
May not count toward BA ENGL major or minor. May not count toward foundations curriculum humanities requirement. Must be taken immediately before student teaching. P: Admission to upper division; ENED 4960. Methods of teaching language, composition, and literature in grades 7-12.
4324. Internship in English (10) (S)
May not count toward foundations curriculum humanities requirement. P: Admission to upper division; a minimum grade of C (2.0) in ENED 2123, 3815, 4323, 4960; EDTC 4001; EDUC 3200; PSYC 3206; PSYC 4305 or EDUC 4400; SPED 4010. Observation and supervised internship in English in public secondary school.
4325. Internship Seminar: Issues in English Education (2) (S)
P: Admission to upper division; C: ENED 4324. Individualized study of problems or issues related to English Education. Creation of professional portfolio. Preparation for certification examinations.
4501, 4502, 4503. Independent Study in English Education (1, 2, 3)
May be repeated for 4 s.h. with change of topic. Number of hours per week will depend on credit hours and nature of work assigned. P: BS Secondary English; consent of dept chair or program coordinator. Topics supplement regular instruction.
4960. Literature for High School (3) (WI) (F)
To be taken immediately before ENED 4323. May not count as an advanced elective for ENGL majors. P: ENGL 1200. Literature for grades 7-12.
4970. Literature for the Younger Adolescent (3) (WI) (F)
May not count as an advanced elective for ENGL majors. May not count toward foundations curriculum humanities requirement. P: Admission to upper division in MIDG or consent of instructor. Purpose and role of literature study in middle grades. Criteria for selection of appropriate literature, including literature for and about minority groups.
 

ENGL: English

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1000. Appreciating Literature (3) (F,S,SS) (FC:HU)
Enrollment limited to students with fewer than 40 s.h. credit. Introduces past and present readings to enhance student’s enjoyment and understanding of literature.
1100. Composition (3) (WI) (F,S,SS) (FC:EN)
Principles of expository writing and their application to writing tasks. Emphasis on methods of organization; techniques for developing unified, well-supported paragraphs and essays; grammatical conventions, proofreading and editing skills; and other important aspects of the writing process.
1200. Composition (3) (WI) (F,S,SS) (FC:EN)
P: ENGL 1100. Instruction in critical reading, library research, and research writing. Analytical and argumentative writing.
2000. Interpreting Literature (3) (WI) (F,S,SS) (FC:HU)
P: ENGL 1200. Principal genres of literature with attention to literary devices, techniques, and interpretation.
2050. English for Global Communication (3) Same as COMM 2050
Examines the development of English as a global language and its implications.
2100. Major British Writers (3) (F,S) (WI) (FC:HU)
P: ENGL 1200. Major works of English literature.
2200. Major American Writers (3) (WI) (F,S,SS) (FC:HU)
P: ENGL 1200. Major works of American literature before World War II.
2700. Introduction to Language Studies (3) (F,S) (FC:HU)
P: ENGL 1200. Emphasis on origins of language, historical development of English, acquisition of language, relationship of meaning and language use, and role of linguistic diversity.
2710. English Grammar (3) (F,S)
P: ENGL 1200. Traditional grammar. Emphasis on syntax, forms and usages, and punctuation.
2740. Language in the USA (3) (FC:HU)
P: ENGL 1200. Linguistic perspective on emergence of American English within the context of many languages spoken in the USA, both past and present. Issues related to language usage, language variation, and linguistic pluralism also discussed.
2760. Afro-Caribbean Language and Culture (3) (WI)
P: ENGL 1200. Description and analysis of the languages spoken by the descendents of Africans in the Caribbean.
2830. Writing and Style (3) (WI)
P: ENGL 1200. Study of stylistic techniques in written texts through rhetorical analysis and a series of experimental and practical writing activities.
2900. Introduction to Film Studies (3) (F,S) (FC:HU)
3 lecture and 3 lab hours per week. P: 1000-level writing intensive course or advanced placement or consent of instructor. Analyze and critique films.
3000. History of British Literature to 1700 (3) (F,S) (FC:HU)
P: ENGL major, minor, or consent of dept; ENGL 1200. British literary history to 1700.
3010. History of British Literature, 1700-1900 (3) (F,S) (FC:HU)
P: ENGL major, minor, or consent of dept; ENGL 1200. British literary history 1700 to 1900.
3020. History of American Literature to 1900 (3) (F,S) (FC:HU)
P: ENGL major, minor, or consent of dept; ENGL 1200. American literature history to 1900.
3030. Introduction to Rhetorical Studies (3) (WI)
P: ENGL 1200. Introduces rhetoric, including classical and modern theories, and to research and citation practices. Attention to practical application of rhetorical principles in written texts of popular culture, mass media, and education.
3040. Introduction to Professional Writing (3) (WI)
P: ENGL 1200. Overview of professional writing principles, current communication issues, research practices, and emerging technologies.
3230. Southern Literature (3) (FC:HU)
P: ENGL 1200. Survey of southern literature from Antebellum writers, through the Southern Renaissance period, to contemporary writers.
3240. U.S. Latino/a Literature (3) (WI) (FC:HU)
P: ENGL 1200. Examines literatures written in English in United States by Latino/a writers, including Chicano/a, Cuban-American, Dominican-American, and Puerto Rican-American writers.
3250. Native American Literatures (3) (WI) (FC:HU)
P: ENGL 1200. Emphasis on twentieth century.
3260. African American Literature (3) (WI) (F,S,SS) (FC:HU)
P: ENGL 1200. Emphasis on twentieth century.
3270. The Frontier in American Literature (3) (WI) (FC:HU)
P: ENGL 1200. Westward expansion in America as depicted in popular fiction.
3280. African Literature (3)
P: ENGL 1200. Overview of African literature in English from the twentieth- and twenty-first centuries.
3290. Asian American Literature (3) (FC:HU)
P: ENGL 1200. Overview of Asian American literature from twentieth- and twenty-first centuries.
3300. Women and Literature (3) (WI) (F,S,SS) (FC:HU)
P: ENGL 1200. Literature by and about women.
3330. Early Twentieth-Century Drama (3) (FC:HU)
P: ENGL 1200. Drama from Ibsen to World War II. Selected plays of Ibsen, Strindberg, Chekhov, Synge, Shaw, Pirandello, and Oneil
3340. Contemporary Drama (3) (FC:HU)
P: ENGL 1200. Trends in dramatic literature from World War II to present.
3410. Introduction to Poetry (3) (WI) (FC:HU)
P: ENGL 1200. Narration, description, metrics, tone and attitude, imagery, and theme in poetry.
3420. The Short Story (3) (F,S,SS) (FC:HU)
P: ENGL 1200. History, development, and analysis of short story.
3430. Mystery Fiction (3) (FC:HU)
P: ENGL 1200. Development of detective, crime, suspense, and espionage fiction during last century.
3450. Northern European Mythology (3) (WI) (FC:HU)
P: ENGL 1200. Major myths of Norse and Celtic people and their impact on English and American literature.
3460. Literature and Classical Mythology (3) (FC:HU)
P: ENGL 1200. Major myths of ancient Greece and Rome and their impact on English and American literature.
3470. Modern Fantasy (3) (WI) (FC:HU)
P: ENGL 1200. History, development, types, and nature of fantasy during past century.
3480. Science Fiction (3) (F,S) (FC:HU)
P: ENGL 1200. Development of genre from turn of century.
3490. Satire (3)
P: ENGL 1200. Representative works of literary satire.
3570. American Folklore (3) (WI) (F,S) (FC:HU)
P: ENGL 1200. Types of American folklore with concentration on legends and tales.
3600. Classics from Homer to Dante (3) (FC:HU)
P: ENGL 1200. Classical and Medieval literature from Homer to Dante.
3610. Human Values in Literature (3) (WI) (FC:HU)
P: ENGL 1200. Great works of literature that express enduring human values.
3630. The Bible as Literature (3) (FC:HU)
P: ENGL 1200. Various literary genres in the Bible.
3640. Literature and Religion (3) (WI) (FC:HU)
P: ENGL 1200. Interrelationships of literature and religion. Exemplary literary artists vary.
3660. Representing Environmental Crisis (3) (WI)
P: ENGL 1200. Introduction to discursive and narrative representations of environmental crisis in various texts.
3670. Narrating Food and Environment (3)
P: ENGL 1200. Introduction to literary narratives of the connection between nature, culture, and food production.
3700. History of the English Language (3)
P: ENGL 1200. Development of English language and culture; standardization; colonial and post-colonial Englishes.
3710. Advanced English Grammar (3)
P: ENGL 2710 or equivalent. Principles of modern linguistic theory presented and applied to contemporary American English. Utilizes transformational-generative grammar model. Emphasis on practical applications to English language and literature.
3720. Writing Systems of the World (3)
P: ENGL 1200. Writings systems and their relationship to language, literacy, and multicultural communication.
3730. The Structure of English: Phonology and Morphology (3)
P: ENGL 1200. Contemporary linguistic theory and its practical application to teaching phonological and morphological components of English language.
3740. The Structure of English: Syntax and Semantics (3)
P: ENGL 1200. Contemporary linguistic theory and its practical application to teaching syntactic and semantic components of English language.
3750. Introductory Linguistics (3) (FC:HU)
P: ENGL 1200. Methods and techniques of linguistic analysis. Sample problems on phonological, morphological, syntactic, graphemic, and historic reconstruction levels. Emphasis on non- Indo-European languages.
3760. Linguistic Theory for Speech and Hearing Clinicians (3) (F,S)
P: ENGL 1200. Linguistic theory for precise formalization of adult language systems on morphophonological, syntactic, and semantic levels. Emphasis on practical applications to clinical speech therapy.
3770. Language Universals (3) (WI)
P: ENGL 1200. Analysis of components of human language and how they are uniquely configured within the human species, shaped by the brain and evolution.
3810. Advanced Composition (3) (WI) (F,S,SS)
P: ENGL 1200. Advanced study of kinds of composition. Practice in effective writing.
3815. Introduction to Creative Writing (3) (F,S)
P: ENGL 1200. Introduction to the major genres of creative writing.
3820. Scientific Writing (3) (WI) (F,S)
P: ENGL 1200. Practice in assimilation and written presentation of scientific information.
3830. Introduction to Play Writing (3)
P: ENGL 1200. Fundamentals of play writing: finding a voice with a point of view, writing dialog, scene construction, characterization, and plot development.
3831. Plays from the Writer’s Perspective (3)
P: ENGL 1200. Study and theory of play forms and techniques as practiced by contemporary writers.
3835. Persuasive Writing (3) (WI)
P: ENGL 1200. Study and practice of elements of persuasion in academic and public texts.
3840. Introduction to Poetry Writing (3) (F,S)
P: ENGL 1200. Practice in poetry writing.
3841. Poetry from the Writer’s Perspective (3)
P: ENGL 1200. Study and theory of poetic forms and techniques as practiced by contemporary poets.
3850. Introduction to Fiction Writing (3) (F,S)
P: ENGL 1200. Practice in prose fiction writing. Emphasis on the short story.
3851. Fiction from the Writer’s Perspective (3)
P: ENGL 1200. Study and theory of fictional forms and techniques as practiced by contemporary writers.
3860. Introduction to Nonfiction Writing (3) (WI) (F,S)
P: ENGL 1200. Techniques of writing, researching, and marketing nonfiction prose. Emphasis on writing skills.
3861. Creative Nonfiction from the Writer’s Perspective (3)
P: ENGL 1200. Study of creative nonfiction forms and techniques as practiced by contemporary writers.
3870. Introduction to Editing and Abstracting (3) (WI) (F,S)
P: ENGL 1200. Administrative, manuscript, copy, and production editing of nonfiction books, periodicals, and corporate documents.
3880. Writing for Business and Industry (3) (WI) (F,S,SS)
P: ENGL 1200. Composition with writing practice for students in business and industry.
3885. Writing and Publications Development/Process (3) (WI)
P: ENGL 1200; consent of instructor. Development and writing processes (planning, preparing, production) of professional communication documents, such as computer documentation instructions, employee manual, and policy and procedural manuals. Aspects of publication management (scheduling and budgeting).
3890. Critical Writing (3) (WI) (FC:HU)
P: ENGL 1200. Emphasis on critical theory and critical writing.
3895. Topics in Technical and Professional Writing (3) (WI)
P: ENGL 1200; consent of instructor. Intensive study of special topic(s) in technical and professional communication announced by instructor before preregistration period.
3900. American and International Film History, Part I (3)
3 lecture and 2 lab hours per week. P: ENGL 2900 or consent of instructor. Social, industrial, and aesthetic history of the major films, genres, regulatory bodies and economic structures that defined cinema from its inception in the mid-1890s through the onset of World War II.
3901. American and International Film History Part II (3)
3 lecture and 2 lab hours per week. P: ENGL 2900 or consent of instructor. Social, industrial and aesthetic history of the major films, genres, regulatory bodies and economic structures that shaped cinema from World War II to the present.
3920. Film Theory and Criticism (3) (WI) (FC:HU)
P: ENGL 2900 or consent of instructor. Overview of the major theoretical and critical approaches to the study of cinema from the 1920s to the present.
4000. Introduction to Literary Theory (3)
P: English major, minor, or concentration or consent of dept. Comparative study of current approaches to reading literature in various contexts, beginning with New Criticism. Covers approaches such as reader-response, psychoanalytic, poststructuralist, feminist, and postcolonial.
4010. Medieval Literature (3) (WI) (FC:HU)
P: ENGL 1200. Literature from fifth to fifteenth centuries. Excludes Chaucer.
4020. Chaucer (3) (WI) (FC:HU)
P: ENGL 1200. Selections from Chaucer’s poetry.
4030. Milton (3) (WI) (FC:HU)
P: ENGL 1200. Emphasis on Paradise Lost, Paradise Regained, Samson Agonistes, and selected prose.
4040. Literature of the New World to 1820 (3) (WI) (FC:HU)
P: ENGL 1200. Various literatures of North America from writings about earliest explorations and encounters to those of early US. British, Spanish, French, Native American, and African American.
4050. Prose and Poetry of the English Renaissance (3) (WI) (FC:HU)
P: ENGL 1200. Emphasis on beginnings of forms and types.
4070. Shakespeare: The Histories (3) (FC:HU)
P: ENGL 1200. Close reading and critical study.
4080. Shakespeare: The Comedies (3) (F,S) (FC:HU)
P: ENGL 1200. Close reading and critical study.
4090. Shakespeare: The Tragedies (3) (F,S) (FC:HU)
P: ENGL 1200. Close reading and critical study.
4100. Seventeenth-Century Literature (3) (WI) (FC:HU)
P: ENGL 1200. Prose and poetry of seventeenth century England.
4120. Eighteenth-Century Literature (3) (WI) (FC:HU)
P: ENGL 1200. Prose and poetry of neo-classic and pre-romantic periods in British literature.
4150. The Romantic Period (3) (WI) (FC:HU)
P: ENGL 1200. Major poets.
4170. Victorian Literature (3) (WI) (FC:HU)
P: ENGL 1200. Major writers.
4200. American Literature, 1820-1865 (3) (WI) (FC:HU)
P: ENGL 1200. Major writers of Transcendental period. Poe, Emerson, Thoreau, Hawthorne, Melville, and Whitman.
4230. North Carolina Literature (3) (WI) (FC:HU)
P: ENGL 1200. Representative group of literary works examined from various critical perspectives.
4250. American Literature, 1865-1920 (3) (WI) (FC:HU)
P: ENGL 1200. Representative writers of period between the Civil War and World War I. Twain, Dickinson, James, Crane, Wharton, and Dreiser.
4300. Recent British and American Writers (3) (WI) (FC:HU)
P: ENGL 1200. Major works and trends in literature since World War II.
4340. Ethnic American Literature (3) (WI) (FC:HU)
P: ENGL 1200. Examines multicultural literature, including African American, Native American, Jewish American, Hispanic American, and Asian American writers.
4360. World Literature in English (3) (WI) (FC:HU) Formerly ENGL 3100
P: ENGL 1200. Examines literature written in English worldwide, exclusive of the US and England.
4370. Literature and Environment (3)
P: ENGL 1200. Survey of American and/or British literary narratives focusing on the relationship between imagination and nature.
4380. Studies in African American and African Diaspora Literatures (3)
P: ENGL 1200. Topics in African American and African diaspora literatures from the twentieth and twenty-first centuries.
4510, 4520. Directed Readings (3,3) (F,S,SS)
P: ENGL major with consent of dept chair; ENGL 1200. Based on needs and interests of individual student.
4530, 4540. Special Topics Seminars (3,3) (WI*)
P: Consent of instructor; ENGL 1200. Topics announced by instructor at preregistration period.
4550, 4555. Senior Honors Seminar (3,3)
2 3-hour units in succession, but no grade or credit is recorded until the completion of the second 3-hour unit. P: ENGL 1200. Tutorially directed readings in selected area and research writing.
4710. Teaching English as a Second Language: Theories and Principles (3) (F)
P: ENGL 1200. Current theories and principles of teaching English to non-native speakers or speakers of nonstandard dialects.
4720. Applied Linguistics for Language Teachers (3) (S)
P: ENGL 4710. Pedagogical application of linguistic theory. Emphasis on teaching English as a second language.
4730. Language and Society (3) (S)
P: ENGL 1200. Explores language in relation to society.
4740. TESOL Methods (3)
P: ENGL 1200. Approaches and methods in teaching English as a second or foreign language.
4780. Advanced Business Writing (3)
P: ENGL 3880; or consent of Director of Undergraduate Studies in English. Advanced business writing concepts and techniques to strengthen the ability to communicate effectively, ethically, responsibly, and professionally in a business environment.
4835. Classical Rhetorics (3) (WI)
P: ENGL 1200. A critical examination of rhetorical theories of the ancient, medieval, and Renaissance worlds and how those theories apply to written texts.
4885. Digital Writing (3) (WI)
P: ENGL 1200. Focuses on the theory, analysis and production of digital texts.
4890. Practicum: Careers in Writing (3) (WI)
Supervised internship. Minimum of 140 work and academic hours per semester. P: ENGL 1200; consent of instructor. Practical, professional writing in office or agency. Parallel readings and study.
4891. Practicum: Careers in Writing (3) (WI)
Supervised internship. Minimum of 140 work and academic hours per semester. P: ENGL 1200; consent of instructor. Practical, professional writing in office or agency. Parallel readings and study.
4910. Survey of Film Styles and Movements (3) (WI) (FC:HU)
World art and early history of films.
4920. Contemporary American and International Cinema (3) (WI) (FC:HU)
P: 6 s.h. of literature or consent of instructor; RP: ENGL 4910. World art and recent history of films.
4930. Film: The Writer’s Perspective (3)
Thematic analysis of films from the screenwriter’s perspective.
4940. Multicultural and Transnational Cinema (3) (WI)
May be repeated with change of topic for maximum 6 s.h. P: ENGL 2900 or consent of instructor. Critical examination of contemporary cinema from various cultural zones.
4950. Literature for Children (3) (F,S,SS) (FC:HU)
P: ENGL 1200. Early childhood through junior high school literature.
4980. Topics in Film Aesthetics (3)
May be repeated with change of topic for maximum 6 s. h. P: ENGL 2900 or consent of instructor. Selected topics may include works of individual directors, film and the other arts, and film movements. Topics vary depending on interest.
4985. Film Studies Capstone (3) (WI)
3 lecture and 2 lab hours per week. P: ENGL 2900; declared minor in film studies; or consent of instructor. Capstone course for declared interdisciplinary film studies minors.
4999. English Professional Seminar (1)
P: English major. Examines topics related to preparation for graduate school and/or professional life. Design and completion of senior portfolio.
5060. History of Literary Criticism (3)
Major texts of literary criticism from Plato through Pater.
5125. The English Novel Through Hardy (3)
Development of English novel: Defoe, Richardson, Fielding, Austen, the Brontes, Dickens, Thackeray, Eliot, Hardy, and others.
5150. The Twentieth-Century British and American Novel (3)
Representative British and American novelists of twentieth century. Joyce, Woolf, Lawrence, Hemingway, Faulkner, and recent writers.
5160. English Drama to 1642 (3)
Types and developments of English drama from beginnings in Middle Ages until 1642.
5165. English Drama: Dryden to Sheridan (3)
Types and developments of English drama from Restoration to Romantic period.
5170. Modern Drama (3)
Drama from Ibsen to present. Focus on British and American playwrights.
5230. Southern Regional Literature (3)
Southern writing representing attitudes of region. Confined to literary genres.
5250. The American Novel, 1800 to 1920 (3)
Development of American novel. Emphasis on Brown, Cooper, Hawthorne, Melville, Twain, Howells, James, Crane, Dreiser, and Cather.
5260. The Novel Since 1945 (3)
Contemporary novel in English. Emphasis on American and British works.
5275. Nineteenth-Century Poetry (3)
Major British and American poets.
5280. Twentieth-Century Poetry (3)
Variety of voices that comprise poetry written in English.
5330. Studies in Women’s Literature (3)
May be repeated for credit by graduate students. Writings of women within context of feminist scholarship and criticism. Focus on genre within literary period or specific national/international context.
5350. Special Studies in Film (3)
May be repeated for credit by graduate students. Aspects of world film literature. Topics to be announced by instructor.
5360. Studies in African-American Literature (3)
May be repeated for credit by graduate students. Critical methodologies relating to development of African-American literature. Focus on genre or historical context.
5770. Advanced Editing (3)
P: ENGL 3870 or consent of instructor. Advanced study of and practice in various editorial functions as applied to non-fiction books, periodicals, and corporate documents.
5780. Advanced Writing for Business and Industry (3)
P: ENGL 3880 or consent of instructor. Advanced composition with extensive writing practice.
5840. Advanced Poetry Writing (3)
Graduate students may repeat for a maximum of 9 s.h. P: ENGL 3840 or consent of instructor. Advanced poetry-writing practice.
5850. Advanced Fiction Writing (3)
Graduate students may repeat for a maximum of 9 s.h. P: ENGL 3850 or consent of instructor. Practice in prose fiction writing. Emphasis on publication.
5860. Advanced Nonfiction Writing (3)
Graduate students may repeat for a maximum of 9 s.h. P: ENGL 3860 or consent of instructor. Practice in non-fiction prose writing. Emphasis on publication.
5890. Advanced Script Writing (3)
P: ENGL 3830; consent of instructor. Completion of one-act play or major portion of full-length play or screenplay.
ENGL Banked Courses
2750. Grammar and Linguistics for Elementary Education (3)
2800. Critical Reading (3)
3620. Oriental Literature (3)
3800. Computing for the Humanities (3)
5120. English Drama (3)
5130. The English Novel through Jane Austen (3)
5140. The English Novel from Scott through Hardy (3)
5190. The Aesthetic Movement (3)
5270. Contemporary Poetry (3)
5390. Advanced Studies in Science Fiction and Fantasy (3)
5410. Pre-Shakespearean Drama (3)
5460. Early Twentieth-Century Poetry (3)
5740. Modern Prose Literature (3)

ENGR: Engineering Core

Top
1000. Introduction to Engineering (1)
2 lecture hours per week. P: Engineering major. Introduction to the engineering profession, engineering design, and problem solving. Focus on communications, collaborative learning, use of resources, development of engineering study skills, and strategies for student success.
1002. Fundamentals of Engineering Practice (3)
3 lecture hours per week. P: Consent of instructor. Introduction to the engineering profession. Topics include mathematical modeling, functions and graphs, trigonometry, vector geometry, systems of equations and analytical geometry.
1012. Engineering Graphics (2)
1 lecture and 2 lab hours per week. C: MATH 1083 or higher. Engineering graphics in a professional engineering context, including sketching and working drawings, multiple views, sections, solid modeling software, drawing standards, tolerancing, and dimensioning.
1014. Introduction to Engineering (3)
1 lecture and 4 lab hours per week. P: ENGR 1012. Engineering profession and basic tools and concepts of engineering, providing immersive and hands-on experience in engineering practice areas, including professional practice, systems thinking, and basics concepts in machinery, controls, digital circuits, and data analysis.
1016. Introduction to Engineering Design (2)
2 two-hour labs per week. P: ENGR 1000, 1012. Engineering design process including developing design requirements and constraints, determining feasible solutions, evaluating alternative solutions and testing implementing the best dilution. Utilizes case studies and hands-on micro-processor and robotic based design problems in a team environment.
2000. Engineering Design and Project Management I (1)
2 lecture hours per week. P: ENGR 1016 or consent of instructor. Continuation of ENGR 1016. Historical engineering achievements, focusing on the design process and project management issues; engineering failures, emphasizing the impacts on the engineering profession and society; and contemporary issues facing society, focusing on the role of engineering solutions.
2022. Statics (3) (S)
3 lecture hours per week. P: MATH 2152; C: PHYS 2350. Analysis of equilibrium of particles, addition and resolution of forces, equivalent system of forces, equilibrium of rigid bodies, centroid and moment of inertia, structural analysis, internal forces, friction, and virtual work.
2050. Computer Applications in Engineering (3)
2 lecture and 2 lab hours per week. C: Math 1083 or higher. Application of modern programming tools and languages to solve engineering problems.
2070. Materials and Processes (3) (WI)
2 lecture and 2 lab hours per week. P: CHEM 1150. Study of the materials used in engineering and related manufacturing processes. Materials topics include the atomic structure of materials, alloys, phase diagrams, and heat treatment. Manufacturing processes include casting, forming, machining, and joining processes.
2450. Dynamics (3) (S) Formerly ENGR 3004
3 lecture hours per week. P: ENGR 2022 with minimum grade of C (2.0); MATH 2152. Fundamental topics in particle and rigid body dynamics. Planar kinematics of a particle. Planar kinetics of a particle: force and acceleration, work and energy, and impulse and momentum. Planar kinematics of a rigid body.
2514. Circuit Analysis (4)
3 lecture and 2 lab hours per week. P/C: MATH 2154; PHYS 2360. Fundamental electric circuit concepts and theory. Electronic elements and electric power, DC and AC circuits, and circuit analysis methods in time and frequency domains.
3000. Engineering Design and Project Management II (2) (WI)
1 lecture and 2 lab hours per week. P/C: ENGR 3420; P: ENGR 2000. Integration of engineering design and project management. Employs example project to demonstrate the steps of engineering design, develop a project plan, project presentation, and design report with supporting documents.
3012. Thermal and Fluid Systems (4)
3 lecture and 2 lab hours per week. P: ENGR 2450 with minimum grade of C (2.0); MATH 2153. Explores systems approach to design, analysis, and engineering of thermal and fluid systems using mathematical and software tools.
3014. Circuit Analysis (3)
2 lecture and 2 lab hours per week. P: MATH 2153; PHYS 2360. Electrical and electronic engineering concepts, theory, and methods. Includes electric circuit analysis, electro mechanics, and electrical instrumentation systems.
3024. Mechanics of Materials (3) (WI)
2 lecture and 2 lab hours per week. P: ENGR 2022 with minimum grade of C (2.0), ENGR 2070. Behavior of deformable bodies subjected to axial loading, torsion, and bending. Includes stress-strain relations, elastic deflections of beams, effects of combined loading, buckling of slender columns, and failure criteria for ductile and brittle materials.
3050. Sensors, Measurement, and Controls (3)
2 lecture and 2 lab hours per week. P: ENGR 2514 or 3014; MATH 2154. Fundamental concepts of measurement and instrumentation at the system level. Measurement systems cover non-electrical parameters measurement, data acquisition, and signal conditioning. Controls systems cover application of mathematical and analytical tools to model, analyze, and design automated feedback control systems for dynamic processes.
3060. System Optimization (3)
P: MATH 3100, 3307. Introduces mathematical tools applied to system optimization, including problem formulation, identification of decision variables, use of graphical methods, linear programming, concepts of duality, and sensitivity analysis. Applications include transportation, network analysis, project management and other engineering areas.
3100. Internship in Engineering (1) (WI)
P: Consent of instructor. Minimum of 150 hours of supervised work or project experience in engineering. May include industry or service learning activities and be repeated for credit as a technical elective.
3400. Engineering Economics (3) (WI)
3 lecture hours per week. P: MATH 2152. Analysis of cash flows including cost, revenue, and benefits that occur at different times. Evaluation of engineering projects using equivalent worth, benefit-cost, and rate of return including impact of depreciation, taxes, and statistical risk.
3420. Engineering Economics (2)
P: MATH 2152. Analysis of cash flows including cost, revenue, and benefits that occur at different times. Evaluation of engineering projects using equivalent worth, benefit-cost, and rate of return including impact of depreciation, and taxes.
3500. Introduction to Engineering Project Management (3) (WI) Formerly ENGR 3300
3 lecture hours per week. P: ENGR 3400; MATH 3307. System needs and analysis identification, functional requirements analysis, project timelines, network analysis, and system development progress metrics.
3800. Quality Control for Engineers (3) Formerly ENGR 4000
3 lecture hours per week. P: MATH 3307. Analytical procedures associated with Statistical Quality and Process Control. Includes design of experiments, and system approaches to maintenance and improvement of process quality.
3901, 3902, 3903. Undergraduate Research in Engineering (1,2,3)
May be repeated for maximum of 6 s.h. P: Consent of instructor and chair; minimum GPA of 2.5; completion of 20 s.h. of ENGR courses. In-depth study of an experimental or theoretical area involving engineering analysis and design beyond the scope of existing courses.
4010. Senior Capstone Design Project I (2) (WI)
1 lecture and 2 lab hours per week P: ENGR 3000; consent of instructor. Senior capstone course involves open-ended design project, exposing students to practice of engineering design and problem solving. Emphasis on real problems and working with real clients. Students required to visit facilities, interact with client employees, determine on-site data measurement strategies, and perform any necessary literature search. Develop proposal for project to be performed in ENGR 4020.
4020. Senior Capstone Design Project II (2) (WI)
1 lecture and 2 lab hours per week. P: ENGR 4010. Open-ended design project, exposing students to practice of engineering design and problem solving. Requires facility visits, interaction with clients, onsite data measurement and literature search. Preparation and completion of Fundamentals of Engineering professions examination.
4501, 4502, 4503. Special Topics in Engineering (1,2,3)
P: Consent of instructor. May be repeated for credit as a technical elective. Course builds upon knowledge gained from the core engineering or specialization curriculum. Topics typically focus on advanced or emerging area, which will equip graduates with specialized knowledge to improve performance in analysis, synthesis, and design.
4510. Practice of Professional Engineering I (1)
2 lab hours per week. C: ENGR 4010, 4020, or consent of instructor. Problem analysis and review of topics related to the fundamentals of engineering exam and professional practice. Covers topics such as statics and dynamics.

ENMA: Engineering Management

Top
3000. Introduction to Engineering Management (3) (F)
P: Consent of instructor. Introduces principles of management and organization as applicable to engineering profession. Special emphasis on project management, systems engineering and analysis, team building, quality leadership, planning, and quantitative decision making. Includes topic exercises, case studies, and extensive writing assignments.
4010. Entrepreneurship and Intellectual Property (3) (F)
P: ENMA 3000. Understanding of new technological product development process and role of engineering entrepreneurship in managing process. Emphasis on technological opportunity recognition and evaluation, and early technological and marketing stages.
4020. Analysis of Production Systems (3) (S)
P: MATH 3307. Tools and approaches for design and analysis of production systems. Covers strategy, aggregate planning, inventory, location, layout and production control systems.
4030. Engineering Logistics (3) (S)
P: MATH 3307. Logistics from systems engineering perspective. Covers design of systems for supportability and serviceability, production and effective distribution of systems for customer use, and sustaining maintenance and support of systems throughout their period of utilization.

ETHN: Ethnic Studies

Top
2001. Introduction to Ethnic Studies: Humanities (3) (F,S,SS) (FC:HU)
May count toward either the ETHN minor or the foundations curriculum humanities requirement. May receive credit for one of ETHN 2001, 2002, 2003. Comparative analysis of minority groups in US. Focus on social, cultural, historic, economic, and political aspects of each group’s experience in America. Social and cultural sources of bias and discrimination explored through literature and philosophy.
2002. Introduction to Ethnic Studies: Social Science (3) (FC:SO)
May count toward either the ETHN minor or foundations curriculum social sciences requirement. May receive credit for one of ETHN 2001, 2002, 2003. Comparative analysis of minority groups in US. Focus on social, cultural, historic, economic, and political aspects of each group’s experience in America. Social and cultural sources of bias and discrimination explored through the social sciences.
2003. Introduction to Ethnic Studies: Fine Arts (3) (FC:FA)
May count toward either the ETHN minor or foundations curriculum fine arts requirement. May receive credit for one of ETHN 2001, 2002, 2003. Comparative analysis of minority groups in US. Focus on social, cultural, historic, economic, and political aspects of each group’s experience in America. Social and cultural sources of bias and discrimination explored through visual and performing arts.
3501. Selected Topics in Ethnic Studies: Humanities (3) (F) (FC:HU)
Interdisciplinary seminar. May be repeated with change of topic for maximum of 6 s.h.
3502. Selected Topics in Ethnic Studies: Social (3) (S) (FC:SO)
Interdisciplinary seminar. May be repeated for credit with change of topic.
4000. Seminar in Ethnic Studies (3) (S) (FC:HU)
Interdisciplinary seminar examining cultural theories that shape study of US ethnic groups.
5000. Directed Readings in Ethnic Studies (3)
P: Consent of director. In-depth exploration and written senior-level paper on topic relevant to ethnic studies.
5500. Studies in Ethnicity (3)
May be repeated for credit with change of topic. Theoretical and methodological issues.
 

EXSS: Exercise and Sport Science


1000. Lifetime Physical Activity and Fitness Laboratory (1) (F,S,SS) (FC:EX)
Investigation of efficiency of human performance through study of variables related to total fitness, physical fitness, diet, weight control, degenerative diseases, physiological effects of exercise, and significance of motor skills development. Physical activity as a way of life. Emphasis on role physical activity should play in leisure-oriented societies.
1001. Lifetime Physical Activity and Fitness Laboratory II (2) (F,S,SS) (FC:EX)
May receive credit for only one: EXSS 1000, 1001. One lecture hour and two physical activity sessions per week. Instruction in the health related benefits of physical activity focusing on aerobic fitness; body composition; muscular strength, endurance, and flexibility; and exercise adherence.
1010. Fitness Walking (1) (F,SS)
P: EXSS 1000 or 1001. Fundamentals of walking for health and fitness.
1014. Elementary Basketball (1)
For beginners. 2 hours per week. P: EXSS 1000 or 1001.
1015. Elementary Softball (1)
For beginners. 2 hours per week. P: EXSS 1000 or 1001.
1018. Elementary Swimming (1)
For beginners. 2 hours per week. P: EXSS 1000 or 1001.
1021. Elementary Tennis (1)
For beginners. 2 hours per week. P: EXSS 1000 or 1001.
1022. Intermediate Tennis (1)
For students who have mastered fundamentals of tennis. 2 hours per week. P: EXSS 1000 or 1001. Additional skill development and practice.
1025, 1026, 1027. Adapted Activities (1,1,1)
FC:EX) For students with physical disabilities. P: Physical disability which restricts student from taking part in EXSS 1000 or 1001.
1051. Beginning Gymnastics (1)
1060. Introduction to Sailing (1)
For beginners. 2 hours per week. P: EXSS 1000 or 1001.
1101. Physical Conditioning (1) (F,S,SS)
2 hours per week. P: EXSS 1000 or 1001.
1104. Archery (1)
2 hours per week. P: EXSS 1000 or 1001.
1110. Physical Activity for Weight Management (2) (F,S,SS)
1 lecture and 2 lab (physical activity) hours per week. P: EXSS 1000 or 1001. Fundamentals of physical activity and weight management for a healthy lifestyle.
1114. Group Fitness Activities (1) (F,S,SS)
2 hours per week. P: EXSS 1000 or 1001.
1118. Intermediate Swimming (1)
For students who have mastered fundamentals of swimming. 2 hours per week. P: EXSS 1000 or 1001. Additional skill development and practice.
1119. Volleyball (1)
2 hours per week. P: EXSS 1000 or 1001.
1120. Golf (1)
2 hours per week. P: EXSS 1000 or 1001.
1139. Bowling (1)
2 hours per week. P: EXSS 1000 or 1001.
1214. Advanced Group Fitness (1)
For students who have mastered fundamentals of basic group fitness activities. P: EXSS 1114. Additional skill development and practice.
2000. Introductory Exercise and Sport Science (3) (F,S,SS)
General survey of the methods of study of physical activity. Introduction, justification, terminology, history, methods of study, and professional and academic applications.
2020. Physical Activity and Disease Prevention (3) (S)
P: BIOL 1050,1051 or BIOL 1100, 1101; EXSS 1000; HLTH 1000. Survey of adaptations caused by regular physical activity that have a positive influence on disease prevention.
2050. Computer Applications in Exercise and Sport Science (3)
Introduction to computer applications in exercise and sport science.
2122. Motor Development (2) (F,S)
P: BIOL 2130; EXSS 2850. Foundation for planning appropriate motor ability programs throughout life span. Emphasis on birth through adolescence. Observational skills and assessment tools.
2123. Early Experiences for the Prospective Teacher (1) (F,S)
For prospective teachers. Minimum of 16 clock hours of directed observations and planned participation in appropriate school environments and 8 clock hours of seminar class instruction in the teaching area. May not count toward major or minor for the BA degree.
2202. Motor Learning and Performance (3) (F,S,SS)
Introduces fundamental principles involved in learning and performing motor skills in variety of contexts.
2278. Basic Scuba Diving (3)
For beginners. 2 classroom and 3 lab hours per week. P: Satisfactory performance on the NAUI Swimming Test; a notarized statement releasing the instructor and the university from all liability; a satisfactory medical history and medical examination. Basic instruction in fundamental skills and safety patterns. NAUI certification upon satisfactory completion of course.
2323. Principles of Physical Education (2) (F,S,SS)
Basic introduction to physical education. Philosophical, historical, biological, physiological, sociological, and political foundations of physical education.
2500. Dance in the Schools (2) (F,S,SS)
1 lecture and 3 lab hours per week. P: EXSS 1000 or 1001. Introduces Laban's educational dance framework. Creative, folk, and social dance and methods for presenting in schools.
2600. Movement Education (3) (F,S,SS)
P: EXSS 1000 or 1001. Content knowledge and learning experiences in educational games, gymnastics, and fitness for children K-6.
2700. Gymnastics in the Schools (2)
For physical education majors. 4 lab hours per week. P: EXSS 1000 or 1001. Comprehensive gymnastics. Educational gymnastics (grades K-6) and skills for Olympic gymnastics (grades 7-12).
2704. Tutoring (1)
Assignment to activity classes for training and experience in actual conduct of class work.
2727. Sports Officiating: Football, Touch and Flag Football (2)
4 lecture/lab hours per week for 10 weeks. Football and touch and flag football rules and interpretations. Emphasis on proper mechanics, techniques, and responsibilities in officiating.
2730. Sports Officiating: Baseball and Softball (1)
4 lecture/lab hours per week for 5 weeks. Baseball and softball rules and interpretations. Emphasis on proper mechanics, techniques, and responsibilities in officiating.
2777. Lifeguard Training (2)
Two 1-1/2 hours sessions per week. P: Proficiency in basic swimming skills needed in lifesaving. Aquatic skills and lifesaving techniques for certification by American Red Cross.
2788. Water Safety Instructors Training Course (3)
6 hours per week of integrated lecture and lab work. P: EXSS 2777 or consent of instructor. Preparation for teaching swimming courses (beginning through advanced levels) for individuals of all ages and for operating and maintaining pools.
2850. Structural Kinesiology (1) (F,S,SS)
Structural principles of skeletal, muscular, nervous, cardiovascular, and respiratory systems. Emphasis on contributions of systems to human movement.
2900. Teaching Skillful Movement (3) (F,S,SS)
2 lecture and 2 lab hours per week. P: EXSS 2323; P/C: EXSS 2202. Introduces teaching of motor skills. Design and presentation of effective learning experiences for psychomotor skill development through lesson development for peer teaching.
3000. Curriculum in Physical Education (2) (F)
Planning curriculum and implementing instruction through physical education curriculum models.
3278. Skin and Scuba Diving Leadership (3)
For experienced, knowledgeable, and certified divers. 6 hours per week. P: EXSS 2278 or consent of instructor; minimum age of 18 by completion of the course; 1 year of diving experience with appropriate dives and hours logged; verification of good physical condition as indicated by a recent medical examination; personal diving equipment suitable for open water; a completed standard application with a clear, recent photograph. Preparation for teaching skin and scuba diving and/or attaining dive-master certification.
3300. Applied Sports Psychology (3) (F)
P: PSYC 1000. Psychomotor theory as applied to athletic performance and coaching. Focus on understanding and enhancement of psychomotor skills related to optimal athletic performance.
3301. Physical Education and Sport in Modern Society (3) (F,SS)
P: Health and human performance major or minor; or consent of instructor. May not count toward foundations curriculum requirement. Social organization of sport and its relationship to basic aspects of institutional structure, cultural patterns, and dynamics of American society.
3500. Secondary Content in Physical Education (3) (F,S,SS)
2 lecture hours and 4 lab hours per week. P: Declared EXSS major; EXSS 1000 or 1001. Content knowledge and learning experiences in target, net/wall, territory, and fielding games.
3510. Lifetime Activities (1) (F,S,SS)
2 lab hours per week. P: Declared EXSS major and EXSS 1000 or 1001. Basic skills and knowledge in archery, golf, badminton, and racquet sport variations.
3520. Team Sports (1) (F,S,SS)
2 lab hours per week. P: Declared EXSS major and EXSS 1000 or 1001. Basic skills and knowledge in basketball, softball, and volleyball.
3530. Field Sports (1) (F,S,SS)
2 lab hours per week. P: Declared EXSS major and EXSS 1000 or 1001. Basic skills and knowledge in flag football, soccer, speed ball, and other field sport variations.
3540. Fitness Education (2) (F,S,SS)
P: Declared EXSS major. Provides practical knowledge and skills to develop, organize and administer age-appropriate health-related fitness education programs for K-12 students.
3545. Practices and Procedures in Physical Education for Elementary Schools (2)
Satisfies EXSS requirement for elementary education. Not open to EXSS majors. P: Elementary education major or consent of instructor. Emphasis on selection of materials and presentation methods to be utilized with physical education in grades K-6.
3600. Coaching Theories (3)
Fundamentals and foundations of coaching as a profession and applications to coaching responsibilities.
3700. Essentials of Strength and Conditioning (3) (F,S)
P: EXSS 3805. Theory and application of strength training.
3800. Measurement of Physical Activity and Fitness (2) Formerly EXSS 3804
P: BITE 2112 or MIS 2223 or EXSS 2050; EXSS 2000; or consent of instructor; C: EXSS 3801. Practical methods for measuring physical activity and fitness.
3801. Measurement of Physical Activity and Fitness Laboratory (1)
2 lab hours per week. P: BITE 2112 or MIS 2223 or EXSS 2050; EXSS 2000; or consent of instructor; C: EXSS 3800. Application of data management and analysis to measures of physical activity and fitness.
3802. Obesity Prevention and Treatment (3) (S)
P: BIOL 1050,1051 or 1100,1101; EXSS 1000 or 1001; HLTH 1000 or 1050; or consent of instructor. Introduction to the development of obesity and different intervention methods used for prevention and treatment.
3803. Physical Activity and Cancer (3) (F)
P: BIOL 1050/1051 or 1100/1101; or consent of instructor. Introduction to the study of physical activity and cancer from primary prevention to rehabilitation.
3805. Physiology of Exercise (3) (F,S,SS)
P: BIOL 2130 or BIOL 2140, 2150; EXSS 2850. Effect of exercise on physical and chemical processes of the human body.
3806. Physiology of Exercise Laboratory (1) (F,S,SS)
One 2-hour lab per week. P/C: EXSS 3805. Assessment and measurement of the effect of exercise on physical and chemical processes of the human body.
3850. Introduction to Biomechanics (3) (F,S,SS)
Two 2-hour lecture/lab classes per week. P: BIOL 2130 or BIOL 2140; EXSS 2850; PHYS 1250, 1251; or consent of instructor. Fundamentals of neuromuscular function and biomechanics of human movement in healthy, injured, and diseased populations.
3880. Personal Fitness Training (2)
P: Declared EXSS major or consent of instructor; C: EXSS 3881. Fundamentals of personal fitness training.
3881. Personal Fitness Training Laboratory (1) 2 lab hours per week.
P: Declared EXSS major or consent of instructor; C: EXSS 3880. Fundamentals of personal fitness training laboratory.
3900. Elementary School Instruction in Physical Education (3) (F,S)
Extensive supervised practicum required. One lecture and 3 lab hours per week. P: Upper-division standing; EXSS 2122, 2500, 2600, 2900. Skills and knowledge for teaching motor skills to children K-6.
3906. Physical Education for Special Populations (3) (WI) (F,S,SS)
P: Upper-division standing; EXSS 2323; SPED 2000; or consent of instructor. Procedures and techniques in physical education for special populations.
3910. Diversity Issues in Teaching Physical Education (3) (F,S)
P: EDUC 3200 or any 2123 early experience course in a teacher education program area. Teacher candidates enhance their sensitivity to, and appreciation of, diversity of others within physical education.
4001, 4002, 4003. Special Topics In Exercise and Sport Science (1,2,3)
May be repeated for a maximum of 6 s.h. with change of topic. New or advanced topics vary by current faculty applied research.
4115. Physical Activity and Public Health (3) (F)
P: EXSS 1000; HLTH 1000. Introduction to understanding the role physical activity has in public health settings.
4278. Scuba Diving Instructor Training Course (3)
Minimum of 80-hour training program. 3 2-hour sessions per week. P: EXSS 3278; minimum age of 18 to be reached on or before completion of the course; a minimum of 1 year of diving experience since receiving open water diving certification with a total of at least 50 logged dives with 25 hours of bottom time; good physical condition for scuba diving as verified by a medical examination within the past year; certification in first aid, diving rescue techniques, or lifesaving and cardiopulmonary resuscitation; a completed NAUI waiver release and indemnity agreement and a NAUI instructor training course statement of understanding; own diving equipment. National Association of Underwater Instructor training course to train and evaluate candidates for certification as NAUI instructors.
4300. Program Development and Management in Physical Education and Sports (3)
P: Health and human performance major or minor; EXSS 2000 or 2323; or consent of instructor.
4301. Comparative Sport and Physical Education: International Aspects (3) (WI) (S,SS)
P: Health and human performance major or minor; EXSS 3301. Cultural, social, and political importance of sport and physical education around the world.
4323. Middle and High School Instruction in Physical Education (3) (F,S)
For preservice physical education teachers. Two lecture and 2 lab hours per week. P: Upper-division standing; EXSS 3510, 3520, 3530, 3540, 3900; P/C: EXSS 4804. Teaching skills appropriate for middle and high school instruction in physical education. Supervised teaching practicum and preparation for internship semester. Must pass with a minimum grade of C.
4324. Internship in Exercise and Sport Science (9) (F,S)
Full-time, semester-long internship. P: Upper-division standing; completion of upper-division courses, except READ 3990, EXSS 4325; C: EXSS 4325. Observation and supervised teaching in assigned physical education public school classroom.
4325. Internship Seminar: Issues in Physical Education (1) (F,S)
P: Upper-division standing; C: EXSS 4324. Individualized study of problems or issues pertinent in physical education pedagogy and the development of the Senior II Teaching Portfolio.
4333. Sport and Fitness Marketing (3) (S, SS)
P: EXSS 4300; or consent of instructor. Theories, concepts, and practical applications in current marketing techniques relating to the sport and fitness enterprise.
4400. Creating Positive Learning Environments in Physical Education (3) (F,S)
2 lecture hours and 2 lab hours per week. P: Upper-division standing. Teacher candidates apply student behavior management, learning environment design, and critical observation in physical education.
4500, 4501, 4502. Independent Study in EXSS (1,2,3) (WI)
P: Consent of instructor. Individualized program developed through student initiative in consultation with designated instructor.
4700. Internship in Sports Studies (12)
P: Satisfactory completion of all other degree requirements or consent of dept chair. Supervised field experience to develop applied competence in exercise and sport leadership.
4800. Internship in Health Fitness (12) (F,S,SS)
Supervised field experience. 480 hours per semester. P: Satisfactory completion of all other degree requirements or consent of dept chair. Develop applied competence in physical activity and fitness leadership.
4804. Measurement and Evaluation in Exercise and Sport Science (3) (F,S,SS)
2 lecture and 2 lab hours per week. P: Upper-division standing; EXSS 2323; MATH 1065; health and human performance major or minor or consent of dept chair. Develop competencies needed for evaluation in exercise and sport science. Emphasis on basic statistics, selection, and administration of standardized tests, test construction, planning for evaluation programs, and appropriate microcomputer applications.
4805. Exercise Evaluation and Prescription Laboratory (1) (F,S,SS)
1, 2-hour lab per week. C: EXSS 4806. Development of competencies for exercise assessment, evaluation and prescription.
4806. Exercise Evaluation and Prescription (3) (WI) (F,S,SS)
P: Health and human performance major or minor; EXSS 3805; or consent of instructor; C: EXSS 4805. Methods for assessing fitness and developing training techniques in asymptomatic populations.
4807. Advanced Exercise Physiology (3) (F)
P: EXSS 4806, CHEM 2750, 2753 (C (2.0) or better), and consent of instructor. Physiological responses to exercise and health. Emphasis on effects of physical training and other factors that affect physical performance and health.
4808. Cardiopulmonary Physiology (3) (S)
P: EXSS 4806, CHEM 2750, 2753 (C (2.0) or better), and consent of instructor. Current topics in cardiopulmonary physiology as related to clinical and basic science aspects of exercise science. Topics include cardiopulmonary anatomy and function; cardiovascular pharmacology; metabolic evaluation/assessment/programming during exercise and other issues related to clinical exercise science.
4809. Exercise Prescription for Clinical Populations (3) (F,S)
P: EXSS 4806. Fundamentals of prescribing aerobic, strength and flexibility exercise for clinical populations to include: cardiovascular disease, pulmonary disease, hypertension, diabetes, obesity, etc.
4850. Exercise Leadership (3) (F,S)
2 lecture and 2 lab hours per week. P: EXSS 1114 or 1214, 3805; Declared EXSS major or consent of instructor. Leadership experiences in physical activity settings. Knowledge and skills associated with leading others to become physically active. Exercise leadership experiences to develop instructional skills for diverse physical activity settings.
4991. Independent Research in Exercise Physiology (3) (WI*) (F,S)
9 lab hours per week. P: EXSS 4806; or consent of exercise physiology coordinator. Plan and execute investigative study in exercise physiology under supervision of faculty mentor.
4992. Research Internship in Exercise Physiology (12) (F,S,SS)
40 lab hours per week for 15 weeks. P: Completion of all other requirements for the exercise physiology option or consent of internship coordinator. Professionally supervised research experience in approved research lab.
5020. Exercise Adherence (3)
P: PSYC 1000; P/C: EXSS 4806; HHP major or minor or consent of instructor. Personal and situational factors which result in adherence to an exercise program. Focus on application of strategies for improving adherence.
5278. Advanced SCUBA Diving (3)
2 lecture and 3 lab hours per week. P: Satisfactory performance on the NAUI Swimming Test; EXSS 2278 or consent of instructor; a notarized statement releasing the instructor and the university from all liability; a satisfactory medical history and medical examination. Variety of safe diving experiences under controlled conditions beyond basic open water diving levels.
5303. Physical Activity Programs for Individuals with Developmental, Emotional, and Learning Disabilities (3)
2 lecture and 3 field work hours per week. P: EXSS 3545 or 3546; SPED 5101; or consent of instructor. For physical educators, special educators, therapeutic recreation specialists, and others concerned with providing physical activity programs to individuals with developmental, emotional, or learning disabilities.
5305. Motor Development (3)
P: EXSS 2800 or equivalent or consent of instructor. Applies motor development theory and techniques to numerous settings. Descriptions of changes in movement patterns and skills. Examines underlying processes which influence these changes.
5800. Physical Activity and Aging (3) (SL)
P: GERO 2400 or consent of instructor. Role of physical activity and exercise in enhancing quality of life and remediating normal aging deficits and age-related disease. Includes physiological, cognitive, and affective perspectives.
5903. Physical Activity Programs for Individuals with Orthopedic, Neurologic, and Sensory Impairments (3)
2 lecture and 3 field work hours per week. P: BIOL 2130 or equivalent. For physical educators, special educators, therapeutic recreation specialists, and others concerned with providing physical activity programs to individuals with orthopedic, neurologic, and sensory impairments.
5904. Methods in Adaptive Aquatics (2)
1 classroom and 3 lab hours per week. P: Advanced lifesaving certification. Swimming techniques as adapted for individuals with acute and chronic disabling conditions.
EXSS Banked Courses
5400. Activities in Physical Education for the Elementary School (3)