East Carolina University. Tomorrow starts here.®
 
Academic Affairs
Undergraduate Catalog 2007-08


BlackBoardIT Help DeskPirateIDIndexEmail and PhoneOneStopCalendarAccessibility

Undergraduate Courses


A B C D E F G H I J L M N O P R S T W
 
 

CDFR: Child Development and Family Relations

1103. Marriage and Family Relations (3) (F,S,SS)
Functional relationships in which individuals love, grow, and share through communication, sexuality, and other human interrelationships.
2000. Child Development I: Prenatal Through Early Childhood (3) (F,S,SS)
Behavior and development of children from conception to eight years of age.
2001. Child Development II: Middle Childhood Through Young Adulthood (3) (F,S,SS)
Behavior and development of children between the ages of eight and twenty-one years.
2021. Introduction to Child Life (2) (S)
P: Intended child life major. Course includes practicum experience. Overview of the field of child life.
2123. Early Experience in Birth through Kindergarten Education (1) (F,S)
For prospective teachers. Minimum of 16 hours of directed observation and planned participation in preschool settings and 12 hours of seminar. Introduces birth-kindergarten teaching.
2124. Interaction Techniques for Working with Young Children (2) (F,S)
Requires practicum experience. P: CDFR major; C: CDFR 2123. Theory and practice in interacting with young children. Emphasis on specific techniques of interaction with and guidance of infants, toddlers, and preschool-aged children.
2280. Introduction to Child, Family, and Community Services (3) (F, S)
May not count toward CDFR minor. Examines various careers and opportunities to work with children and families from three theoretical perspectives: ecological systems, family systems, and lifespan development.
2400. Introduction to Gerontology (3) (F,S,SS) (FC:SO) Same as GERO 2400; SOCW 2400
May count toward foundations curriculum social sciences requirement and SOCI major or minor. Current theory and research in gerontology from interdisciplinary perspective.
3002. Child in the Family (3) (F,S,SS)
Overview of child-family relationships. Emphasis on reciprocal interaction of child and family.
3150. Introduction to Early Childhood Intervention (3) (F,S)
P: CDFR 1103, 2000. Examines concepts, principles, and applications of early childhood intervention for children from birth through five years.
3210. Models and Foundations of Early Childhood Education (3) (S)
P: CDFR major. Explores philosophies and practices associated with different models of early childhood education.
3215. The Family As Consumers (3) (S)
P: CDFR 1103. Comprehensive study of family financial resources and their management with application for consumer decision-making skills and advocacy.
3306. Guiding Children’s Behavior (3) (F,S,SS)
P: CDFR 2000. Roles and responsibilities of parents and teachers in guiding children’s behavior. Review of theory and research addressing appropriate practices and methods of modifying children’s behavior.
3290. Theory and Practice in Family and Community Services (3) (F, S)
P: CDFR 2280, FCS major. Examination of theories and applications of professional skills for working within family and community agencies.
3400. Current Issues in Early Childhood Education (3) (SS)
P: CDFR 3150. May be repeated for credit with change of topic up to 6 s.h. Current topics and issues related to child development and early childhood education.
3413. The Hospitalized Child (3) (WI) (F)
Course includes practicum experience. P: Child life major; CDFR 2000, 2001, 2021. Recognizing psychosocial needs of children and families in healthcare settings. Techniques to promote positive coping skills of children and families in stressful situations.
4000. Introduction to Child and Family Research (3) (F,S)
P: FCS major; foundations curriculum math requirement. Introduction to the basic elements of scientific thought and the stages of the quantitative research process employed in child and family studies.
4001. Community Services Internship (8) (WI) (F,S)
Minimum of 310 hours to include labs and classroom work. P: Senior standing; FCS major; CDFR 4366; 2.25 GPA; C: CDFR 4410. Observe and participate in community agency.
4002. Child Development: Early Intervention Internship (8) (F,S)
Minimum of 310 hours to include labs and classroom work. P: Senior standing; FCS major; CDFR 4406; 2.25 GPA. Observe and participate in an agency serving children ages birth through 8 years.
4006. Families, Sexuality, and Gender Roles. (3) (F,S)
P: CDFR 1103; and junior or senior standing. Biological, cognitive, social, emotional, and cultural influences on human sexuality and gender roles within the context of relationships and families.
4007. Public Policy and Legal Issues Affecting Families (3) (S)
P: CDFR major; junior or senior standing. Current public policy and legal issues facing professionals whom work with children and families.
4200. Developmental and Educational Assessment of Young Children (3) (WI) (S)
Requires practicum experience. P: CDFR 3150. Issues and applications in early intervention and education of children birth through kindergarten, including formal and informal assessment methods and instruments.
4210. Child Life Practicum (3) (F,S,SS)
1 conference and 8 participation hours per week. P: Child Life major; CDFR 3413, 4996, 4997. Practical experiences in child life programming and care for children with medical or other special needs.
4300. Birth through Kindergarten Curriculum Adaptations for Diverse Learners (3) (S)
Practicum experience required. P: CDFR 3150. Application of recommended practices, structuring appropriate learning environments, adapting curricula, and planning activities for all young children from birth through kindergarten.
4303. Families and Cultural Diversity (3) (F,S)
P: CDFR 1103. Comprehensive study of family diversity that occurs because of different cultural environments. Explores racial, ethnic, and economic differences. Emphasis on developing an understanding and appreciation for families with differing values and beliefs.
4313. Trends and Issues in Family Studies (3) (F,S,SS)
P: CDFR 1103. Review and critique scholarly literature related to marriage and family relationships. Contemporary trends and issues that impact marriage and families will be explored.
4320. Practicum in Teaching Birth-Kindergarten in the Public Schools (1) (F,S)
Taken simultaneously with Senior 1 internship. P: Admission to upper division and consent of instructor. Reflective study of professional issues in early childhood education and topics arising from internship experience.
4321. Infant and Toddler Curriculum (3) (S)
Requires practicum experience. P: CDFR 3150. Application of principles of child development in designing appropriate environments and curricula for children from birth to three years.
4322. Preschool Methods and Materials (3) (F,S)
Practicum experience required. P: CDFR 3150. Applies principles of child development and preschool education in designing appropriate learning environments and curricula for children ages three to five years.
4323. Kindergarten Curriculum (3) (F)
Requires practicum experience. P: Admission to upper division; CDFR 3150. Application of principles of child development and early childhood education with an emphasis on beginning reading, writing, and mathematics concepts.
4324. Internship in Birth Through Kindergarten Education (10) (F,S)
Full-time, semester-long internship. P: Admission to upper division; CDFR 3306, 4300, 4321, 4322, 4323, 4406; professional studies courses; CDFR 4303 or ELEM 3275; C: CDFR 4325; and consent of instructor.. Observation and supervised teaching in an assigned public school program or other approved school/center serving children birth through kindergarten.
4325. Internship Seminar: Issues in Birth-Kindergarten Education (2) (F,S)
P: Admission to upper division and consent of instructor. C: CDFR 4324. Individualized study of problems and/or issues in birth through kindergarten education.
4366. Family Life Education (3) (F,S)
P: Junior or senior standing; FCS major, CDFR 3290; P/C: CDFR 4000. Introduction and critical analysis of family life education. Nature, history, intellectual and philosophical foundations, delivery, and evaluation of methods, materials, resources, and group processes.
4390. Family Resource Management (3) (S)
P: CDFR major. Identification and management of family resources. Impact of decision making on families’ quality of life. Effect of resource generation and allocation on family relationships and well- being at different stages of family life.
4406. Parent-Professional Collaboration (3) (WI) (F)
Practicum experience required. P: CDFR 4200. Collaboration between families and professionals. Emphasis on strategies, skills, and resources needed to facilitate development of young children.
4408. Administration of Programs for Young Children (3) (F)
P: CDFR 4322. Planning, organizing, and administering programs for young children ages birth through five years.
4410. Professional Seminar (1) (WI) (F,S)
P: Senior standing; FCS major; CDFR 4366; 2.25 GPA; C: CDFR 4001. Develop professional practices. Topics vary.
4411. Professional Internship (3) (F,S)
C: CDFR 4410. Minimum of 125 hours of directed work experience involving application of family life education. Topics vary.
4415. Child Life Internship (12) (F,S,SS)
480 minimum total hours. P: child Life major; CDFR 4210, 4996, 4997. Specialized child life experience with children and families in a healthcare setting, under supervision of certified child life specialist.
4500. Independent Study (3) (F,S,SS)
May be repeated for credit with change of topic up to 9 s.h. Current issues and problems related to children and families.
4521. Directed Readings (1) (F,S,SS)
May be repeated for credit with change of topic up to 4 s.h. Independent study of current topics in child development and family relations.
4996, 4997. Child-Family Internship and Laboratory (3,0) (F,S)
1 conference and 8 lab hours per week. P: CDFR 2000, 3002; 4321, or 4322. Supervised practicum experience in program serving children and/or families. Variable titles and content.
5403. Parent Education (3) (S)
P: Senior standing; CDFR 1103; 2000 or 2001; 3002, 3306; and junior or senior standing or admission to CDFR graduate program. Strategies, skills, and resources to assist parents and professionals who work directly with them.
5411. Counseling Elders and Their Families (3) (SS:OY)
P: GERO 2400 or admission to CDFR graduate program. Interventions for age-related problem behaviors in social and family systems of elderly.
5412. Family Crises and Resources (3) (S)
P: CDFR 1103; senior standing or admission to CDFR graduate program. Individual and family reactions to crises and special problems encountered in family living. Reviews individual and community resources pertinent to such problems.
5420. Family Intervention Models (3) (F)
P: CDFR major or admission to CDFR graduate program. Selected family intervention and skill development models with opportunity for in-depth study of individual theoretical approach.
5903. Readings in Aging Studies (3) Same as GERO 5903; SOCW 5903
May count maximum of 3 s.h. toward the baccalaureate minor in gerontology or graduate certificate in gerontology. P: Junior or senior standing or admission to CDFR graduate program. Selected from monographs or journals. Focus on specialized areas in which student has taken one or more courses in either baccalaureate gerontology minor or graduate gerontology certificate.
5992, 5993. Advanced Preschool Internship (3,0)
1 conference and 8 lab hours per week. P for undergraduate students: CDFR major, senior standing; P for graduate students: Admission to CDFR graduate program. Advanced internship experiences with preschool children and their parents.
CDFR Banked Courses
3100. Resource Management for the Elderly (3)
4998, 4999. Preschool Practicum (9,0)
5336. Methods of Teaching Personal and Family Living (3)
5392. Economic Problems (3)
5400. Seminar in Aging Studies (3)
5410. Gerontology: Developing the Living Environment (3)

CHE: College of Human Ecology

Top
1000. College of Human Ecology Freshman Seminar (1)
2 classroom hours per week; P: enrolled in first or second semester at ECU with intended major in one of the undergraduate majors in the College of Human Ecology (CHE). Introduction to student life at ECU with a focus on development of academic skills, careers in CHE and decision making for student success.
1001. Academic Success Strategies (1)
2 classroom hours per week; P: CHE 1000 or COAD 1000; completion of fewer than 35 hours; GPA below 2.0; intended major in one of the majors in CHE; permission of instructor. Focus on development of study skills, strategies for success, and proficient use of resources at ECU.
1002. Diversity, Leadership, & Service: A Model for the Human Sciences. (3)
P: CHE 1000 or COAD 1000, intended major in one of the majors in CHE. Series of seminars and service learning opportunities to acquaint students with leadership, diversity, and engagement within the community.
2126. Consumer Affairs (3)
Decision making, consumption patterns, and trends of marketplace consumer. Consumer information and protection.
3990, 3991, 3992. Field Experience in Human Ecology (1,1,1) (F,S,SS)
Supervised professional work experience. May not be substituted for other required internships. P: CHE major or minor; minimum cumulative 2.0 GPA; minimum 2.5 GPA in CHE; 6 s.h. in applicable human ecology area; consent of dean. Placement in area of student’s major or minor.
4500, 4501, 4502. Independent Study (3,3,3) (F,S,SS)
Problems in child development, family relations, food, nutrition, hospitality management, consumer economics, family resource management, apparel, textiles, interior design, criminal justice, and/or social work.
4521. Readings in Human Ecology (1) (F,S,SS)
Independent study in areas of student’s interests.
5005, 5006, 5007. Special Problems in Human Ecology (1,2,3)
May be repeated for credit with different titles. 5007 same as FACS 5007. P: Consent of instructor. Variable content and special topics in areas of human ecology.
CHE Banked Courses
3999. Issues in Human Ecology (3)
4999. Professional Development in Human Ecology (3)

CHEM: Chemistry

Top
0150. Preparation for College Chemistry (2) (F,S,SS)
3 lectures per week. May not count toward foundations curriculum science requirement. C: MATH 1065. Intensive review and study of basic chemical laws and mathematical tools needed for further study in general chemistry.
1020. General Descriptive Chemistry (4) (F,S) (FC:SC)
May not count toward foundations curriculum science requirement for science majors. General chemistry for nonscience majors.
1021. General Descriptive Chemistry Laboratory (1) (F,S) (FC:SC)
3 lab hours per week. Chemistry lab for nonscience majors. P/C: CHEM 1020. Lab experiences illustrate fundamental chemical principles and relevance of chemistry in modern world. Topics include chemical measurements, acids, synthesis and purification of biochemical substances and DNA fingerprinting.
1120. Basic General, Organic, and Biochemistry I (4) (F,S,SS) (FC:SC)
May not count toward foundations curriculum science requirement for science majors. General, organic, and biochemistry and chemical applications in health professions.
1121. Basic General, Organic, and Biochemistry Laboratory I (1) (F,S) (FC:SC)
3 lab hours per week. C: CHEM 1120. Introduces lab techniques in general, organic, and biochemistry.
1130. Basic General, Organic, and Biochemistry II (3) (F,S,SS) (FC:SC)
May not count toward foundations curriculum science requirement for science majors. P: CHEM 1120. Continuation of CHEM 1120.
1131. Basic General, Organic, and Biochemistry Laboratory II (1) (F,S,SS) (FC:SC)
3 lab hours per week. C: CHEM 1130. Continuation of CHEM 1121.
1150, 1151. General Chemistry and Laboratory I (3,1) (F,S,SS) (FC:SC)
For science majors. 3 lecture and 3 lab hours per week. P: Chemistry placement test or passing grade in CHEM 0150; P/C: MATH 1065; C for 1150: CHEM 1151; C for 1151: CHEM 1150. Basic principles and laws of chemistry. Topics include measurements, reactions and stoichiometry, thermochemistry, atomic structure, periodicity, bonding and molecular structure, and states of matter.
1160, 1161. General Chemistry and Laboratory II (3,1) (F,S,SS) (FC:SC)
3 lecture and 3 lab hours per week. P: CHEM 1150, 1151; C for 1160: CHEM 1161; C for 1161: CHEM 1160; RC: MATH 1083 or 1085. Continuation of CHEM 1150. Topics include solutions, kinetics, equilibrium, acid-base theory, thermodynamics, and electrochemistry. Introduces organic, nuclear, and coordination chemistry.
1500. Materials Chemistry I (3) (S)
Chemistry of elements and compounds, atomic structure, molecular geometry and intermolecular forces and their effect on the design and uses of materials. May not count toward chemistry major.
1510, 1511. Materials Chemistry II and Laboratory (1,1) (F)
1 hour lecture and 3 hours lab per week. P: CHEM 1500; C for CHEM 1510: CHEM 1511; C for CHEM 1511: CHEM 1510 Continuation of CHEM 1500. Chemistry of elements and compounds, equilibrium, thermodynamics and kinetics and their effect on the design and uses of materials. Lab experience demonstrates chemical properties of materials. May not count toward chemistry major.
2103. Introduction to Chemical Literature (1) (WI) (F,S)
P: CHEM 2750. Introduces methods used to search and access chemical literature. Development of technical writing skills.
2111. Applications of Molecular Modeling (1) (F,S) (FC:SC)
P/C: CHEM 2750. Applies molecular modeling to explore relationships between molecular structure and molecular properties.
2250, 2251. Quantitative and Instrumental Analysis (3,2) (WI, WI) (F,S)
3 lecture and 6 lab hours per week. P: CHEM 1160, 1161; 1 semester of organic CHEM; C for 2250: CHEM 2251; C for 2251: CHEM 2250. Theories and techniques of classical quantitative and modern instrumental analysis.
2301. Teaching Laboratory Chemistry (2,0) WI) (F,S)
1 lecture and 3 lab hours per week. P: Grade of B or higher in CHEM 1160 and CHEM 1161 or permission of instructor. Instruction and supervised experience in methods and practice of teaching introductory chemistry lab.
2650. Organic Chemistry for the Life Sciences (4) (F)
May not count toward CHEM major or minor. May not substitute as a prerequisite for CHEM 2760. P: CHEM 1160, 1161. Principles of organic chemistry. Emphasis on biologically important topics.
2651. Organic Chemistry Lab for the Life Sciences (1) (F)
3 lab hours per week. May not count toward CHEM major or minor. May not substitute as a prerequisite for CHEM 2763. C: CHEM 2650. Organic lab techniques.
2750. Organic Chemistry I (3) (F,S,SS)
P: CHEM 1160, 1161; C: CHEM 2753. Classes of compounds and their typical reactions, mechanisms, stereochemistry, and instrumental methods in organic chemistry.
2753. Organic Chemistry Laboratory I (1) (F,S,SS)
3 lab hours per week C: CHEM 2750. Organic lab techniques.
2760. Organic Chemistry II (3) (F,S,SS)
P: CHEM 2750; C: CHEM 2763. Continuation of CHEM 2750.
2763. Organic Chemistry Laboratory II (1) (F,S,SS)
3 lab hours per week P: CHEM 2750, 2753; C: CHEM 2760. Continuation of CHEM 2753.
2770. Biological Chemistry (3) (F,S) (FC:SC)
P: CHEM 2650 or 2760. Chemistry and intermediary metabolism of proteins, carbohydrates, lipids, and nucleic acids.
2771. Biological Chemistry Laboratory (1) (F,S) (FC:SC)
3 lab hours per week. C: CHEM 2770. Applies chemical lab techniques to study of proteins, carbohydrates, lipids, and nucleic acids.
3301. Practicum in Teaching (1) (F,S)
3 lab hours per week. May be repeated for credit. May count maximum of 4 s.h. toward CHEM major. P: CHEM 2301 and consent of instructor. Supervised practicum in teaching introductory chemistry lab.
3450. Elementary Inorganic Chemistry (3) (WI) (S)
P: CHEM 2250, 2251; C: CHEM 3451. Survey of fundamental concepts and theories of inorganic chemistry, periodicity, descriptive chemistry of selected main group elements and transition metals, and their role in organometallic, bioinorganic, and industrial chemistry.
3451. Elementary Inorganic Chemistry Laboratory (1) (WI) (F,S)
P: CHEM 2250, 2251; C: CHEM 3450 or 5550. Inorganic laboratory techniques, physical methods, and the synthesis and characterization of inorganic and organometallic compounds.
3501, 3502, 3503. Special Topics in Chemistry (1,2,3)
May be repeated for maximum of 6 s.h. with change of topic. May not count toward foundations curriculum science credit. P: CHEM 1160; consent of instructor. Selected topics of contemporary interest.
3850, 3851. Introduction to Physical Chemistry (4,1) (WI, WI) (F)
4 lecture and 3 lab hours per week. P: CHEM 1160, 1161; MATH 2122 or 2172; PHYS 1260, 1261; C for 3850: CHEM 3851; C for 3851: CHEM 3850. Physical chemistry for students with limited mathematical background.
3950, 3951. Physical Chemistry and Laboratory I (4,1) (WI, WI) (S)
4 lecture and 3 lab hours per week. P: CHEM 2250, 2251; MATH 2173; PHYS 1261, 2360; C for 3950: CHEM 3951; C for 3951: CHEM 3950. Theoretical and mathematical treatment of fundamental laws and theories underlying science of chemistry.
3960, 3961. Physical Chemistry and Laboratory II (4,1) (WI, WI) (F)
4 lecture and 3 lab hours per week. P: CHEM 3950, 3951; C for 3960: CHEM 3961; C for 3961: CHEM 3960. Continuation of CHEM 3950, 3951.
4103. Seminar (1) (F,S)
P: Junior or senior standing; CHEM 2103. Discuss contemporary topics in chemistry, instruction on technical presentations, and submission of written and oral reports on approved topics. Requires attendance at selected departmental seminars.
4505, 4506, 4507. Independent Study (1,2,3) (F,S,SS)
May be repeated for credit. May count a maximum of 3 s.h. toward CHEM major. P: Consent of instructor and dept chair. Individual study in selected area of chemistry under immediate direction of faculty member.
4515, 4516, 4517. Research Problems in Chemistry (1,2,3) (F,S,SS)
May be repeated for credit. May count maximum of 6 s.h. toward CHEM major. P: Consent of instructor. Advanced problems in chemistry pursued under supervision of faculty member.
5350, 5351. Instrumental Analysis (3,1) (WI, WI)
3 lecture and 3 lab hours per week. P: CHEM 3960; C for 5350: CHEM 5351; C for 5351: CHEM 5350. Theory and practical uses of modern instrumental methods of chemical analysis.
5525, 5526, 5527. Special Topics (1,2,3)
May be repeated for credit with change of topic. P: Consent of instructor. Selected topics of current interest in areas of analytical, inorganic, organic, and physical chemistry.
5550. Advanced Inorganic Chemistry (4) (F)
P: CHEM 3950; C: CHEM 3451 (for BS chemistry majors only). Advanced treatment of atomic and molecular structure, molecular symmetry, group theory, MO theory, the solid state and ionic bonding, transition metal coordination and organometallic compounds, homogeneous catalysis, and acid-base, redox, and bioinorganic chemistry.
5750. Advanced Organic Chemistry (3)
P: CHEM 2760; P/C: CHEM 3960. Physical organic topics, including aromaticity, acid/base chemistry, reactive intermediates, mechanisms of common organic reactions, and relationship between structure and reactivity.
5760. Organic Structure Elucidation (3)
P: Consent of instructor. Applies modern instrumental methods to elucidation of structures of organic compounds, with particular regard to elucidation of complex structures from combined application of spectral tools.
5993. Industrial Internship in Chemistry (3)
25-30 lab hours per week. May count maximum of 3 s.h. toward CHEM major. May be repeated. P: Selection by joint Department of Chemistry/Industry screening committee; CHEM 2250, 2760, 3950. Professional experience in industrial application of chemistry.
CHEM Banked Courses
1163. Introduction to Computer Techniques in Experimental Chemistry (1)
3860, 3861. Introduction to Instrument - Computer Interfacing (2,1)
5390. Bioanalytical Chemistry (2)
5450. Industrial Chemistry (3)
5560. Inorganic Reaction Mechanisms (2)
5950, 5951. Introduction to Nuclear Chemistry (2,1)
5970. Chemical Thermodynamics (2)

CHIN: Chinese

Top
1001. Chinese Level 1 (3) Formerly CHIN 2000
Lab work. Intensive training in basic skills of understanding, speaking, reading, and writing Mandarin Chinese.
1002. Chinese Level II (3) Formerly CHIN 2001
Lab work. P: CHIN 1001 or placement by Chinese placement test. Continued intensive training in basic skills of understanding, speaking, reading, and writing Mandarin Chinese. Second of a two-course sequence.

CLAS: Classical Studies

Top
1300. Greek and Latin for Vocabulary Building (3) (FC:HU)
No previous knowledge of Greek or Latin required. Greek and Latin elements in English, intended to increase dramatically the student’s knowledge of English and command of its vocabulary.
2000. Introduction to Classics (Humanities) (3) (WI*) (FC:HU)
May receive credit for one of CLAS 2000, 2001, 2002. Civilization of classical antiquity through a survey of literature, philosophy, and art of ancient Greece and Rome.
2001. Introduction to Classics (Social Sciences) (3) (FC:SO)
May receive credit for one of CLAS 2000, 2001, 2002. Civilization of classical antiquity through a study of history and culture of ancient Greece and Rome.
2002. Introduction to Classics (Fine Arts) (3) (FC:FA)
May receive credit for one of CLAS 2000, 2001, 2002. Civilization of classical antiquity through a survey of art of ancient Greece and Rome. Emphasis is art-historical. Readings include major works of literature from both cultures.
2220. Great Works of Ancient Literature I: Greece (3) (FC:HU)
Ancient Greek literature from time of Homer to Alexander the Great. Emphasis on cultural ideals expressed in epic and lyric poetry, drama, philosophy, oratory, and history.
2230. Great Works of Ancient Literature II: Rome (3) (FC:HU)
Roman literature from Plautus to Marcus Aurelius. Emphasis on cultural ideals expressed in its epic and lyric poetry, drama, philosophy, oratory, and history.
2400. Women in Classical Antiquity (3) (FC:HU)
Status and daily life of women in ancient Greece and Rome, attitudes expressed toward them, and their roles in art, archaeology, and literature of ancient world through contemporary approach.
2500. Greek Tragedy in Translation (3) (FC:HU)
Selection of tragedies of Aeschylus, Sophocles, and Euripides in translation.
2600. The Power of Images in Ancient Greece and Rome (3) (FC:HU)
Monuments and material culture of Greece and Rome, their philosophical and literary background, and the political purposes to which they were put.
3400. The Ancient City: Rome (3) (F,S) (FC:HU)
Development of one of the world’s great cities, Rome, from its origins to late antiquity. Use of its monuments and topography as sources for history and culture of society that produced them.
3410. The Ancient City: Pompeii (3) (FC:HU)
Pompeii, the oldest archaeological site still under continuous excavation, from its origins to eruption of Mt. Vesuvius in 79 AD. Use of its monuments and topography as sources for history and culture of this unique Roman city.
3460. Classical Mythology (3) (FC:HU)
Same as ENGL 3460 Major myths of ancient Greece and Rome and their impact on English and American literature.
3600. Greek and Roman Religions (3) (FC:HU) Same as RELI 3600
Religious ideas, practices, and beliefs from prehistoric Crete to the Roman empire in the time of Plotinus (250 AD), including eastern cults of Isis and Mithras, Judaism and Christianity.
3700. Selected Topics in Classical Studies (3)
May be repeated for a maximum of 6 s.h. with change of topic. Selected topics relating to literature, culture, or civilization of the ancient Mediterranean world.
4000. Seminar in Classics (3) (WI) (S)
Interdisciplinary seminar in classics on various topics to be chosen by instructors and students.
4521, 4522, 4523. Directed Readings in Classics in Translation (1,2,3) (FC: HU)
May be repeated once with a change of topic for a maximum of 6 s.h. P: Consent of instructor. In-depth exploration of selected aspects of classical civilization in translation.

CLSC: Clinical Laboratory Science

Top
2000. Introduction to Clinical Laboratory Science (2) (F,S)
Four major areas in clinical lab: hematology, immunology, clinical chemistry, and microbiology. Function of various health professionals in these areas and career opportunities.
3410, 3411. Hematology I Lecture and Laboratory (3,1) (F)
3 lecture and 3 lab hours per week. Formation and morphology of cellular elements of blood and hematologic findings in normal blood samples. Normal hemostasis, hemostatic disorders, and lab evaluation and monitoring of hemostasis. Lab covers manual hematologic analyses, peripheral blood and bone marrow smear evaluations from normal samples, and samples of coagulation tests.
3420, 3421. Hematology II Lecture and Laboratory (3,1) (S)
3 lecture and 3 lab hours per week. P: CLSC 3410, 3411. Hematologic findings in anemias, various types of infections, storage diseases, leukemias and myeloproliferative disorders, myelodysplatic syndromes, plasma cell diseases, and lymphomas. Overview of hematology instrumentation.
3430. Clinical Immunology (2) (F)
2 lecture hours per week. P: Consent of instructor. Basic principles. Emphasis on concepts used in clinical lab.
3440, 3441. Clinical Microscopy and Serology Lecture and Laboratory (2,1) (SS)
2 lecture and 3 lab hours per week. P: CLSC 3430. Introduces characteristics and methods of chemical and microscopic examination of urine and other non-blood body fluids. Basic concepts of immunology as applied to serological analyses used in clinical lab. Lab introduces basic tests and techniques used in clinical microscopy and serology.
4001, 4002, 4003. Independent Study in Clinical Laboratory Science (1,2,3) (F,S,SS)
May be taken multiple times for credit. P: Admission to CLSC program; consent of dept chair. Independent study in selected area of clinical laboratory science under the immediate direction of CLSC faculty member.
4210, 4211. Immunohematology Lecture and Laboratory (3,1) (SS)
3 lecture and 3 lab hours per week. P: Consent of instructor. Basic concepts. Emphasis on basic lab techniques and resolution of problems in preparation and administration of blood components.
4430, 4431. Clinical Chemistry I (2,1) (F)
2 lecture and 3 lab hours per week. P: 4 CHEM courses; 1 statistics course; consent of instructor. Applies basic principles of analytical and biochemistry to measurement of chemical constituents in body fluids.
4440, 4441. Clinical Chemistry II (4,2) (S)
4 lecture and 6 lab hours per week. P: CLSC 4430, 4431; or consent of instructor. Applies basic principles of analytical and biochemistry to analysis of chemical constituents in body fluids and relationship to disease states.
4460, 4461. Clinical Microbiology I (4,2) (F)
4 lecture and 6 lab hours per week. P: BIOL 2110, 2111; or 3220, 3221; or consent of instructor. Essentials of clinical bacteriology.
4470, 4471. Clinical Microbiology II (3,2) (S)
3 lecture and 6 lab hours per week. P: CLSC 4460, 4461; or consent of instructor. Essentials of select clinically significant bacteria (mycobacteria, chlamydia, mycoplasma, etc.), clinical mycology, and clinical virology.
4480, 4481. Clinical Microbiology III (2,1) (SS)
2 lecture and 3 lab hours per week. P: CLSC 4470, 4471; or consent of instructor. Essentials of clinical parasitology.
4491. Molecular Diagnostics in Clinical Laboratory Science I (1) (F)
1 lecture hour per weekly. P: Consent of instructor. Introduction to the theory used in the clinical laboratory for molecular diagnosis and management of human disease.
4492. Molecular Diagnostics in Clinical Laboratory Science II (1) (S)
1 lecture hour per week for 7 weeks. 3 lab hours per week for 7 weeks. P: CLSC 4491, consent of instructor. Specific genetic alterations found in various diseases and disorders along with experience performing selected testing methodologies used for molecular diagnostics in the clinical laboratory.
4500. Research Problems in Medical Technology (2)
P: Consent of dept chair. Individual study in selected area of CLSC under supervision of department faculty member.
4772. Clinical Project: Hematology (4) (F,S,SS)
May include clinical experiences, literature review, and/or lab testing. P: CLSC major; consent of dept chair. Individualized clinical project from topic area in hematology or hemostaasis under direction of CLSC faculty member.
4773. Clinical Project: Chemistry (4) (F,S,SS)
May include clinical experiences, literature review, and/or lab testing. P: CLSC major; consent of dept chair. Individualized clinical project from topic area in clinical chemistry under direction of CLSC faculty member.
4774. Clinical Project: Blood Bank (4) (F,S,SS)
May include clinical experiences, literature review, and/or lab testing. P: CLSC major; consent of dept chair. Individualized clinical project from topic area in blood bank (immunohematology) under direction of CLSC faculty member.
4777. Clinical Project: Microbiology (4) (F,S,SS)
May include clinical experiences, literature review, and/or lab testing. P: CLSC major; consent of dept chair. Individualized clinical project from topic area in clinical microbiology. May include clinical parasitology or clinical mycology under direction of CLSC faculty member.
4801. Professional Practice Issues I (3) (WI) (F)
3 lecture hours per week. P: CLSC major. Professional issues related to current practice in clinical lab science including basic research design and statistics, human rights protection in research, basic epidemiology and infection control monitoring and educational methodology all applied to clinical and continuing education in clinical lab science, management theories and practices as applied to clinical laboratory practice.
4802. Professional Practice Issues II (4) (S) (WI)
4 lecture hours per week. P: CLSC 4491, consent of instructor. Professional issues related to current practice in clinical lab science including management theories and practices, fiscal management, personnel administration, and legal and ethical issues, all as related to practice as a clinical lab supervisor or manager, as well as completion of senior research project.
4803. Introduction to Clinical Laboratory Information Systems (2) (S)
2 lecture hours per week. P: CLSC major or consent of instructor.
4992. Clinical Education: Hematology, Coagulation, Urinalysis (4) (F,S)
256 hours in appropriate department of affiliated clinical lab. P: CLSC 3420, 3421; consent of instructor. Supervised clinical experience in hematology, coagulation, and urinalysis.
4993. Clinical Education: Chemistry (4) (F,S)
256 hours in appropriate department of affiliated clinical lab. P: CLSC 4440, 4441. Supervised clinical experience in clinical chemistry.
4994. Clinical Education: Blood Bank and Serology (4) (F,S)
256 hours in appropriate department of affiliated clinical lab. P: CLSC 4210, 4211; consent of instructor. Supervised clinical experience in blood bank and serology.
4997. Clinical Education: Microbiology (4) (F,S)
240 hours in appropriate department of affiliated clinical lab. P: CLSC 4470, 4471; consent of instructor. Supervised clinical experience in clinical microbiology.
4998. Clinical Education in Alternate Settings (3)
P: Consent of instructor. Supervised clinical experience in variety of lab settings.
CLSC Banked Courses
4600. Introduction to Clinical Cytology (2)
4601. Introduction to Cytological Techniques (1)
4610. Gynecologic Cytology (6)
4611. Gynecologic Cytology Laboratory (6)
4620. Cytopathology (3)
4630. Cytology of Body Fluids (3)
4641. Cytology of the Alimentary Tract (2)
4642. Urinary Tract Cytology (2)
4650. Cytology of Fine Needle Aspiration (3)
4660. Special Techniques in Cytology (2)
4665. Seminar in Cytotechnology (2)
4750. Clinical Education in Cytology I (4)
4751. Clinical Education in Cytology II (5)
4995, 4996. General Clinical Education (1,1)

CMGT: Construction Management

Top
2200. Introduction to the Construction Industry (3) (F)
History of construction management. Role of construction within residential, commercial, and heavy industries.
2210, 2211. Construction and Civil Materials (3,0) (F,S)
2 lecture and 2 lab hours per week. P: Minimum overall GPA of 2.0; majors or minors only; P/C: MATH 1065 or 1066. Introduction to construction materials with an emphasis on the physical characteristics, properties, and significance of the materials to the industry.
2660, 2661. Structural Materials, Systems and Codes (3,0) (F,S,SS)
2 lecture and 2 lab hours per week. P: Minimum overall GPA of 2.0; Minimum grade of C in CMGT 2210. Selection criteria and graphical interpretation of concrete, steel, masonry and wood used in foundation, substructure, and super-structure of residential and commercial buildings. Considers performance, maintainability and cost/benefit aspects. Introduces major building codes, materials and industry standards, and utilization of manufacturers’ catalogs.
2664, 2665. Interior and Exterior Finishes and Systems (3,0) (F,S,SS)
2 lecture and 2 lab hours per week. P: Minimum overall GPA of 2.0; minimum grade of C in CMGT 2660. Selection criteria and graphical interpretation of common interior and exterior finish systems, exterior cladding, roofing, and interior systems of buildings. Considers aesthetics, performance, code requirements, maintainability, and cost/benefit aspects.
2800. Foundations of Construction (3) (F,S,SS)
2 lecture and 2 lab hours per week. P: Minimum overall GPA of 2.0; minimum grade of C in CMGT 2210; computer-related elective. Graphical expression of construction and architectural elements through use of CAD and drafting techniques, including lettering, orthographic and isometric projection, descriptive geometry, construction document organization and preparation, and specifications.
3100. Construction Plans and Analysis (3) (F,S)
2 lecture and 2 lab hours per week. P: Minimum overall GPA of 2.0;CMGT 2800; P/C: CMGT 2664, 2665. Practical exercises in reading and evaluating plans for construction projects to discern project design, construction materials, and construction placement techniques. Emphasis on understanding graphic communication methods.
3660. Structural Analysis (3) (F,S)
P: minimum overall GPA of 2.0; minimum grade of C in CMGT 2664; MATH 1074 or 1075 or equivalent; PHYS 1250, 1251. Introduces statics, strength of materials, and structural analysis as related to stability of building’s structural components. Topics include building loads resulting in compressive and tensile forces in columns, beams, and trusses; strength of components to resist such loads; analysis of components under varying load conditions; and basic design considerations of common temporary construction structures such as formwork, bracing of vertical elements, rigging for lifts, and retaining walls.
3662, 3663. Mechanical and Electrical Construction (3,0) (F,S)
2 lecture and 2 lab hours per week. P: Minimum overall GPA of 2.0; minimum grade of C in CMGT 3664. Study of mechanical, electrical, and plumbing systems, applicable codes, and effect on the construction process. Emphasis on air conditioning, heating, plumbing, fire protection, electrical power and lighting, and control systems with coordination to construction documents.
3664. Construction Contracts and Specifications (3) (F,S)
P: Minimum overall GPA of 2.0; minimum grade of C in CMGT 2664; P/C: CMGT 3100. Practices and principles in use of contract documents and specifications as they apply to construction project. Emphasis on relationship to construction process and project management.
3666, 3667. Construction Surveying (3,0) (F,S)
2 lecture and 3 lab hours per week. P: Minimum overall GPA of 2.0; CMGT 3100; MATH 1074 or 1075 or equivalent. Construction aspects of surveying with field and classroom exercises in use of transit, level, tape, and related surveying equipment. Problems and exercises in traverse closure and pipeline, grading, street, curve, and building layout.
3726. Construction Project Safety Management (3) (F,S)
P: Minimum overall GPA of 2.0; minimum grade of C in CMGT 3664. Use of safety management as a company profit center with focus on estimating and scheduling of required safety standards as they impact the sixteen CSI divisions. Includes safety control strategies based on training, programs, and culture.
3766, 3767. Soils and Foundations (3,0) (F,S)
Formerly CMGT 2666 2 lecture and 2 lab hours per week. P: Minimum overall GPA of 2.0; minimum grade of C in CMGT 2664; GEOL 1500, 1501; MATH 1074 or 1075 or equivalent; PHYS 1250, 1251. Fundamentals of soil mechanics as related to soil classification and construction of earthwork and foundations.
4501. Laboratory Problems: Construction Management (3)
6 lab hours per week. P: Minimum overall GPA of 2.0; consent of CMGT instructor. Independent study to gain further expertise in particular area of construction management.
4502, 4503, 4504. Independent Study: Construction (1,2,3)
P: Minimum overall GPA of 2.0; consent of dept chair. Special topics in selected areas of construction. Exploration and research in personal areas of interest.
4505. Special Projects (1-3) (WI) (F,S)
P: Minimum overall GPA of 2.0; consent of dept chair. Develop and submit business and management documents that pertain to varied aspects of construction.
4506. Laboratory Problems: Woods Processing Technology (3)
6 lab hours per week. P: Minimum overall GPA of 2.0; consent of dept chair. Selected concepts and processes in woods processing technology.
4600, 4601. Managing Construction Quality (3,0) (WI) (F,S)
2 lecture and 2 lab hours per week. P: Minimum overall GPA of 2.0; CMGT 3662; ITEC 3290; P/C: CMGT 4662. Quality management and assurance techniques relevant to develop a Quality Management System incorporating productivity, documentation, and quality control. Identify tests, inspections, and quality control methods as specified by construction documents and regulatory criteria.
4660. Construction Estimating (3) (F,S)
P: minimum overall GPA of 2.0; minimum grade of C in CMGT 3664; P/C: CMGT 3660. Procedures to quantify materials, labor, and equipment for construction. Emphasis on classification of work, quantity survey techniques, cost estimating and understanding of schedule of values with coordination to construction documents.
4662. Construction Planning and Scheduling (3) (F,S)
P: Minimum overall GPA of 2.0; minimum grade of C in CMGT 4660. Applies planning and scheduling techniques to construction projects. Emphasis on bar charts, critical path method (CPM), cost allocation, schedule updating, cash flow, and resource scheduling with coordination to construction documents.
4664. Construction Management Capstone (3) (F,S)
P: Minimum overall GPA of 2.0; CMGT 4600; minimum grade of C in CMGT 4662. Integrates all aspects of the construction management process. Employ knowledge and techniques acquired in the construction management program to manage a construction project. Emphasis on team interactions, project management, decision making, and problem solving utilizing current construction documents.
4666. Equipment Management (3) (F,S)
P: Minimum overall GPA of 2.0; CMGT 3660, 3766. Productivity, performance, and maintenance requirements of construction equipment.
4668. Human Side of Project Management (3) (F,S)
P: Minimum overall GPA of 2.0;MGMT 3202; minimum earned credit hours equal to 110 s.h. Developing group and individual relationships among construction personnel to comply with laws and regulations governing human element in construction project process.
4699. Construction Work Experience and Professional Development (1) (F,S)
Formerly CMGT 3000. P: Minimum overall GPA of 2.0; completed senior summary; applied to graduate;P/C: CMGT 4664; graduating semester. Required of all construction management students. Minimum of 500 documented hours of construction work with state licensed general contractor, subcontractor, construction management company, or other approved employment. Students must pay a fee and sit for the American Institute of Constructors Level I Certification exam during the last semester (F,S) before graduating.
5503. Independent Study: Construction (3)
May be repeated for credit with consent of dept chair. Research-oriented. Problem solving with tools, materials, and processes of construction industry.
CMGT Banked Courses
3101. Construction Plans and Analysis Lab (0)
2242. Engineering Economics (3)
3278. Hydraulics (3)
4266. Route Surveying (4)

COAD: Counselor and Adult Education

Top
1000. Student Development and Learning in Higher Education (1)
(F,S) 2 classroom hours per week. P: Enrolled in first 2 semesters at ECU or consent of instructor. Introduction to student life at ECU. Focus on development of academic skills, learning processes, career decision-making, and personal attributes essential for student success.
2001. Issues and Topics for Residential Advisors (2) (F,S)
P: Consent of dept chair. Training to become effective resident advisors.
5370. Introduction to Counseling and Human Services (3)
Issues and processes of counseling services and programs. Attention given to history, philosophy, functions, and professional issues.
COAD Banked Courses
5380. The Adult Education Learning Center (3)

COAS: Coastal and Marine Studies

Top
2025. Survey of Coastal and Marine Resources (3) (F)
May not be taken after receiving credit for COAS 2125. P: Basic science course in BIOL, CHEM, GEOL, or PHYS. Biological, physical, social, and historic aspects of coastal and marine resources.
2150, 2151. Boating Skills and Seamanship (1,1)
C for 2150: COAS 2151; C for 2151: COAS 2150. Knowledge and skills needed to safely use a small boat, following the United States Coast Guard Auxiliary standards.
4000. Scientific Diving and Underwater Research Techniques (3) (F, S)
P: Basic SCUBA certification (or equivalent) and consent of instructor. Fundamentals of scientific diving, including the use of Nitrox, specialized diving equipment, emergency procedures, sampling techniques, and the history and policies related to scientific diving. Fee required.
4001. Scientific Diving and Underwater Research Techniques Lab (1) (S)
2 pool hours per week. P: Basic SCUBA certification (or equivalent) and consent of instructor. P/C: COAS 4000. Required confined water training for scientific diver certification.
4002. Scientific Diver Qualification (1) (SS)
P: Basic SCUBA certification (or equivalent), COAS 4000, 4001 (or equivalent), and consent of instructor. Required openwater training for scientific diver certification. Successful completion of this qualification, associated course, and lab may be used to meet American Academy of Underwater Sciences (AAUS) and ECU scientific diver certification requirements.
4025. Society and the Sea Seminar (3) (S)
May not be taken after receiving credit for COAS 5025, 5026. P: COAS 2025. Interdisciplinary seminar in coastal and marine resources. Research paper of senior-level quality.
5000. Scientific Diving and Underwater Research Techniques (5)
4 lecture and 2 lab hours per week. P: Consent of instructor. Fundamentals of scientific diving, including the use of Nitrox, specialized diving equipment, emergency procedures, sampling techniques, and a review of basic scuba diving skills.
5001, 5002. Coastal Marine Resources Problem Analysis (3,3)
Equivalent of 60 hours of research per semester. P: Research project approved by instructor. Analysis of recognized problem in coastal marine resources in consultation with assigned faculty.
COAS Banked Courses
2125. Survey of the Coastal Marine Environment (2)
5025, 5026. Man and the Sea Seminar (1,1)

COHE: Community Health

Top
COHE Banked Courses
5460, 5461. Patient Education for Interdisciplinary Health Care Providers (3,0)
 

COMM: Communication

Top
1001. Introduction to Communication (3) (F,S) (FC:SO)
Formerly COMM 2001; EMST 1010 Theory and processes affecting human communication, including interpersonal, small group, and organizational communication as well as theory processes, and history of mass media communication.
1002. Media Writing (3) (WI) (F,S,SS)
Formerly COMM 2002 May not count toward foundations curriculum social sciences requirement. P: ENGL 1100. Writing techniques for print, electronic mass media, public relations, and advertising.
2030. Communication Research (3) (F,S)
Formerly COMM 3030; EMST 2030 2 classroom and 1 lab hours per week. May not count toward foundations curriculum social sciences requirement. P: COMM major or minor or consent of instructor; COMM 1001, 1002. Research methods used to measure content, process, and effects of communication on attitudes, knowledge, and behavior. Research design, data analysis, evaluation, and results presented in quantitative and qualitative research methodologies.
2103. Multimedia Messages for Communication Professionals (3) Formerly COMM 2003
2 lecture and 1 lab hours per week. May not count toward foundations curriculum social sciences requirement. P: COMM major or minor or consent of instructor; COMM 1001, 1002. Multimedia techniques in professional communication settings. Incorporation of text, sound, and video messages through computer technology. Emphasis on integrated message production used by communication professionals in journalism and public relations.
2104. Public Relations and Corporate Writing (3) (WI)
May not count toward foundations curriculum social sciences requirement. P: COMM major or minor or consent of instructor; COMM 1001, 1002. Writing used by print, broadcast, and online media. In-depth practice writing and editing corporate documents to include memos, reports, brochures, newsletter articles, backgrounders, news releases, and media kits.
2320. Basic Reporting (3) (WI) (F,S) Formerly COMM 2200; EMST 2510
May not count toward foundations curriculum social sciences requirement. P: COMM major or minor or consent of instructor; COMM 1001, 1002. Journalistic news style. Gathering, writing, and editing of news stories for print and electronic media. Emphasis on broadcast and print styles and ethical considerations.
2410. Public Speaking (3) (F,S,SS) (FC:FA) Formerly SPCH 2510
Emphasis on organizing and delivering speeches for all occasions, including informative, persuasive, and ceremonial.
2420. Business and Professional Communication (3) (F,S,SS) (FC:FA) Formerly SPCH 2520
Emphasis on developing excellent communication skills in everyday speaking, interviews, group presentations, and public speaking. Student organizes and delivers informative, persuasive, and group presentations.
3061, 3062, 3063, 3064. Special Topics (1,2,3,4) Formerly EMST 3901, 3902, 3903, 3904
May be repeated for maximum of 6 s.h. credit. P: COMM major or minor or consent of instructor; COMM 1001, 1002. Selected topics in electronic media studies.
3110. Persuasion Theories (3) (S) Formerly COMM 3010
May not count toward foundations curriculum social sciences requirement. P: COMM major or minor or consent of instructor; COMM 1001, 1002. Persuasion as communication process. Differing aspects of source, channel(s), and receiver(s). Emphasis on contributions from behavioral theorists.
3120. Public Relations Theory (3) (F,S) Formerly COMM 3440
May not count toward foundations curriculum social sciences requirement. P: COMM major or minor or consent of instructor; COMM 1001, 1002. Survey of theoretical, social, behavioral, and communicative aspects of public relations from which practice is built.
3142. Small Group Communication (3) Formerly COMM 3570
May not count toward foundations curriculum social sciences requirement. P: COMM major or minor or consent of instructor; COMM 1001, 1002. Communication variables which influence quality of group communication. Group processes used for information exchange, problem solving, and decision making.
3151. Family Communication (3)
May not count toward foundations curriculum social sciences credit. P: COMM major or minor or consent of instructor; COMM 1001, 1002. Family members co-construct meanings about their world in the unique communication environment of the family. In this setting, interpersonal and mass mediated communication converge about topics that impact the daily life of family members.
3152. Interpersonal Communication Theory (3) (F) (FC:SO)
Formerly COMM 3050 P: COMM major or minor or consent of instructor; COMM 1001, 1002. Theories and concepts which explain communication in ongoing interpersonal relationships. Focus on relationship development and maintenance.
3160. Organizational Communication Theory (3) Formerly COMM 3360
May not count toward foundations curriculum social sciences requirement. P: COMM major or minor or consent of instructor; COMM 1001, 1002. Meanings and functions of communication in organizational settings. Communication in role relationships, internal and external information system flows, and role of communication in organizational culture development and maintenance.
3172. Media Effects (3) (F,S) (FC:SO) Formerly COMM 3615
P: COMM major or minor or consent of instructor; COMM 1001, 1002. Effects of mass media on individuals, societies, and cultures.
3180. Intercultural Communication (3) Formerly COMM 3080
May not count toward foundations curriculum social sciences requirement. P: COMM major or minor or consent of instructor; COMM 1001, 1002. Communication theory and practice in multicultural contexts. Impact of cultural differences on interpersonal, organizational, and international communication.
3310. Copy Editing and Design (3) (F,S,SS) Formerly COMM 3200
May not count toward foundations curriculum social sciences requirement. P: COMM major or minor or consent of instructor; COMM 1001, 1002, 2320. Basic course in editing and layout of variety of publications.
3311. Business and Economic Reporting (3) (WI) Formerly COMM 3211
May not count toward foundations curriculum social sciences requirement. P: COMM major or minor or consent of instructor; COMM 1001, 1002, 2320. Communication students write about business and economic events.
3320. Advanced Reporting (3) (WI) (F,S) Formerly COMM 3210; EMST 3510
May not count toward foundations curriculum social sciences requirement. P: COMM major or minor or consent of instructor; COMM 1001, 1002, 2320. Principles and techniques of in-depth newsgathering. Topics include research of individuals, business and government, computer-assisted reporting, open meetings/records laws, and media research ethics.
3321. Investigative Reporting (3) (WI) Formerly COMM 3221
May not count toward foundations curriculum social sciences requirement. P: COMM major or minor or consent of instructor; COMM 1001, 1002, 3320. Advanced news gathering techniques for journalists. Online database searching and off-campus trips that encourage in-depth reporting.
3322. Computer Assisted Reporting (3) (WI) (F,S)
May not count toward foundations curriculum social sciences credit. P: COMM major or minor or consent of instructor; COMM 1001, 1002, 2320. Principles and techniques of precision journalism. Topics include use of data analysis tools (e.g.: Excel, Access, SPSS, Arc View), FOI/Open Records laws, practical data analysis, and statistical methods for journalism research.
3330. Feature Writing (3) Formerly COMM 3230
May not count toward foundations curriculum social sciences requirement. P: COMM major or minor or consent of instructor; COMM 1001, 1002, 2320. Study and practice in feature writing for newspapers, magazines, and special publications.
3340. Desktop Publishing (3)
May not count toward foundations curriculum social sciences requirement. P: COMM major or minor or consent of instructor; COMM 1001, 1002, 2320; ENGL 1200. Desktop publishing techniques for print media, public relations, and advertising.
3362. Visual Editing (3) Formerly COMM 3260
May not count toward foundations curriculum social sciences requirement. P: COMM major or minor or consent of instructor; COMM 1001, 1002, 2320; consent of instructor. Use of informational graphics in newspaper and public relations design and layout.
3380. Computer Mediated Communication (3)
May not count toward foundations curriculum social sciences requirement. P: COMM major or minor or consent of instructor; COMM 1001, 1002,. Explores liner and interactive CMC forms as they relate to human behavior and motivation. Involves communication issues related to identity construction, competency/proficiency, rules and conversions for specific mediated forms, online communities, relational development, ethics and deception, freedom of speech and influences on culture and access.
3390. International News Communication (3) (S) (FC:SO) Formerly COMM 3290
P: COMM major or minor or consent of instructor; COMM 1001, 1002,. Study of world news communication systems. International news flow, news gathering agencies, foreign correspondents, theories, debates, and role of communication in global coexistence at socioeconomic and political levels.
3400. Argumentation (3)
May not count toward foundations curriculum social sciences requirement. P: COMM major or minor or consent of instructor; COMM 1001, 1002, ENGL 1200. Argumentation as method of critical inquiry and public advocacy. Analysis of controversies and presentation of oral arguments.
3410. Advanced Public Speaking (3)
May not count toward foundations curriculum social sciences or fine arts requirements. P: COMM major or minor or consent of instructor; COMM 2410 or 2420. Enhances skills learned in COMM 2410 or 2420 and cements skills necessary for excellent business presentations, sales presentations, presentations to a board of directors, and after-dinner presentations. Student refines ability to plan, develop, and deliver professional presentations.
3520. Sports Media Survey (3)
May not count toward foundations curriculum social sciences requirement. P: COMM major or minor or consent of instructor; COMM 1001, 1002,. Basic survey of the historical development of sports communication and reporting including influence of mass media on development of sports reporting. Covers basic principles of writing for sports community using AP Press Sports Writing Guide.
4032. Mass Media Law (3) (F,S) Formerly COMM 4610; EMST 4810
May not count toward foundations curriculum social sciences requirement. P: COMM major or minor or consent of instructor; COMM 1001, 1002; 18 s.h. COMM. Provides working knowledge of legal system as it relates to communication professionals. Emphasis on libel, privacy, copyright, First Amendment, and federal regulation of telecommunication industry.
4040. Media, Culture, and Society (3) (F,S) Formerly COMM 4600; EMST 3530
May not count toward foundations curriculum social sciences requirement. P: COMM major or minor or consent of instructor; COMM 1001, 1002; 15 hours COMM courses or consent of instructor. Critical perspectives on interaction among media, culture, and society.
4042. First Amendment Law (3)
May not count towards foundations curriculum social sciences requirement. P: COMM major or minor or consent of instructor; COMM 1001, 1002; 18 s.h. COMM. Examines historical and contemporary controversies arising under the first amendment to constitution.
4045. Media Literacy for Communication Professionals (3) (F,S)
May not count toward foundations curriculum social sciences credit. P: COMM major or minor or consent of instructor; COMM 1001, 1002,. Media literacy concepts and practices related to producing, understanding, and using messages distributed by mass media.
4050. Media Management (3) (S) Formerly EMST 4510
P: COMM major or minor or consent of instructor; COMM 1001, 1002,. Operation and management of broadcast stations and cable operations.
4060. Special Problems in Communication (3) (F,S,SS)
May not count toward foundations curriculum social sciences requirement. P: COMM major or minor or consent of instructor; COMM 1001, 1002,. Special projects, research, and independent reading for students capable of individual work under guidance of faculty advisor. Designed to fit special needs and interests of students.
4062. Media Sales and Promotion (3) (F) Formerly EMST 4520
P: COMM major or minor or consent of instructor; COMM 1001, 1002,. Role of sales and promotion in public and commercial broadcasting, cable, and related settings. Emphasis on sales, promotion, and fund raising.
4075. Media Criticism (3) (WI) Formerly COMM 4655; EMST 4530
May not count toward foundations curriculum social sciences requirement. P: COMM major or minor or consent of instructor; COMM 1001, 1002,. Interpretive analysis of communication principles and techniques in mediated texts, such as television programs, documentaries, or print advertisements.
4080. Senior Seminar (3) (F,S,SS)
May not count toward foundations curriculum social sciences requirement. P: COMM major or minor or consent of instructor; COMM 1001, 1002; completion of 24 s.h. in COMM before registering for course. Advanced study in communication. Emphasis on contemporary issues.
4081, 4082, 4083. Directed Independent Study (1,2,3) (F,S,SS) Formerly EMST 4981, 4982, 4983
Intermediate or advanced student. May be repeated for maximum of 6 s.h. credit. P: COMM major or minor or consent of instructor; COMM 1001, 1002. Topic not otherwise offered in curriculum or beyond or in greater depth than is possible within context of regular course.
4091, 4092. Internship–Seminar (3,3) (F,S,SS) Formerly EMST 4991, 4992
1 lecture and 10 lab hours per week. 140 hours of observation and practical experience. P: COMM major or minor or consent of instructor; COMM 1001, 1002; 18 s.h. COMM. Placement in professional setting appropriate to student’s area of concentration.
4130. Conflict and Communication (3) Formerly COMM 4030
May not count toward foundations curriculum social sciences requirement. P: COMM major or minor or consent of instructor; COMM 1001, 1002. Role of communication in productive settlement of interpersonal and organizational disputes. Examines effective communication strategies for dispute resolution, mediation, negotiation, and bargaining.
4135. Gender and Communication (3) (F) Formerly COMM 4035
May not count toward foundations curriculum social sciences requirement. P: COMM major or minor or consent of instructor; COMM 1001, 1002,. P for WOST major or minor: COMM 1001, 1002; or WOST 2000 or 2400. Role of communication in construction of gender and role of gender in social organization. Use of language and communication systems.
4170. Directed Readings in Communication (3) (F,S,SS) Formerly COMM 4070
May not count toward foundations curriculum social sciences requirement. P: COMM major or minor or consent of instructor; COMM 1001, 1002. Individually directed study.
4180. Public Relations Strategies (3) (WI) (F,S) Formerly COMM 4440
May not count toward foundations curriculum social sciences requirement. P: COMM major or minor or consent of instructor; COMM 1001, 1002, 3120. Problem-solving strategies and principles of message design for developing public relations campaigns.
4185. International Public Relations (3) (F) Formerly COMM 4445
May not count toward foundations curriculum social sciences requirement. P: COMM major or minor or consent of instructor; COMM 1001, 1002, 3120. Public relations as practiced outside US. Examines reasons for international growth of public relations and explores opportunities for US involvement.
4196. Senior Honors Seminar (3) Formerly COMM 4700
May not count toward foundations curriculum social sciences requirement. P: Senior standing; 3.5 cumulative and major GPA; COMM 1001, 1002. Tutorially directed readings in selected area and research proposal writing.
4199. Senior Honors Thesis (3) Formerly COMM 4705
May not count toward foundations curriculum social sciences requirement. P: Minimum grade of B in COMM 4196. Tutorially directed. Implementation of research proposal generated in COMM 4700. Oral exam covers reading assignments and completed thesis.
4293. Editing and Producing the News (3)
P: COMM 3320; COMM major; COMM 1001, 1002 or consent of instructor. Capstone course in producing and editing for news media.
4400. Rhetorical Theory and Criticism (3)
May not count toward foundations curriculum social sciences requirement. P: COMM major or minor or consent of instructor; COMM 1001, 1002; ENGL 1200. Significant developments in rhetorical theory. Special attention to speech principles and critical analysis of contemporary public address.
4905. Media Ethics (3) (WI)
May not count toward foundations curriculum social sciences requirement. P: COMM major or minor or consent of instructor; COMM 1001, 1002; 18 s.h. COMM. Principles of moral reasoning as applied to ethical dilemmas arising in media professions.
COMM Banked Courses
3012. Persuasion Practicum (3)
3240. Photojournalism (3)
3580. Debate (2)
4233. Advising Student Publications (3)

CSCI: Computer Science

Top
1001. Introduction to Computer Science (3) (F,S)
May not count towards a BA or BS degree in computer science, or towards foundations curriculum credit. Elementary treatment of some basic ideas in computer science, such as how computers store and process data, binary and hexadecimal numbers, arithmetic/logic instructions, social issues, data structures, web pages, and the Internet. Targeted towards novice computer users.
1002. Web Page Programming (3) (F,S)
May not count toward CSCI major or minor. Introduction to the enhancement of web pages using programming techniques. Provides supervised practical experience in the use of an embedded programming language. A portable computer is required.
1200. Introduction to Visual Programming (3) (F,S)
May not count toward CSCI major or minor. P: MATH 1065. Introduces programming using a visual design tool such as Visual Basic.
2300. Computer Science Survey (3) (F,S)
Elementary architecture, operating systems, file systems, network, algorithmic, and software development concepts.
2310, 2311. Algorithmic Problem Solving and Programming Laboratory (4,0) (F,S)
P: MATH 1065; C for 2310: CSCI 2311; C for 2311: CSCI 2310. Design of algorithms and their implementation as programs in high-level language such as Java.
2427. Discrete Mathematical Structures (3) (F,S)
Same as MATH 2427 May not count toward MATH major or minor. May receive credit for only one of CSCI 2427; MATE or MATH 2775, 3237, or MATH 2427. P: MATH 1065 or 1066. Study of discrete mathematical structures. Special emphasis on structures most important in computer science. Practical applications of subject emphasized.
2600. Introduction to Digital Computation (3) (S)
May not count toward CSCI major or minor. P: MATH 1065 or 1066. Emphasis on algorithmic approach to problem solving. Algorithms programmed and run on computer by all students.
2618. COBOL (3) (S)
P: CSCI 2310 or 2610. Basic and advanced elements of COBOL.
3200. Data Structures and Their Applications (4) (F)
P: CSCI 2310, 2311. Common data structures and how to use them in advanced problem solving.
3300. Introduction to Algorithms and Data Structures (4) (F,S)
P: CSCI 2310. C: CSCI 2427. Advanced data representations such as lists and trees, including associated algorithms and use of both static and dynamic memory.
3310. Advanced Data Structures and Data Abstraction (3) (F,S)
P: CSCI 2427, 3300. Data abstractions such as stacks, queues, graphs, tables, and sets, and implementations in object-oriented style, including principles of class design.
3526. Switching Theory and Computer Organization (3) (F,S)
P: CSCI 2310, 2427. Theory and practice of computer and computer component design. Gates and gate-level design.
3573. Introduction to Numerical Analysis (3) (S)
Same as MATH 3573 P: CSCI 2310 or consent of instructor; MATH 2119 or 2172 or equivalent. Algorithms suitable for digital computation in areas of linear algebra, linear programming, slope finding, area finding, and nonlinear equation solution.
3584. Computational Linear Algebra (3) (F,S)
Same as MATH 3584 May not count toward MATH major or minor. P: Calculus course. Introduces vectors, matrices, and determinants. Special emphasis on application of linear algebra to solution of practical problems.
3601. Computer Organization and Programming (3) (F,S)
P: CSCI 3200, 3300 or 3526. Assembly language used to illustrate general machine architecture that executes assembly language command structure.
3650. Analysis of Algorithms (3) (S)
P: CSCI 3200 or 3300; CSCI 2427. Decision trees, mathematical induction, and adversary arguments used to analyze correctness, complexity, and optimality of algorithms. Emphasis on searching and sorting algorithms.
3675. Organization of Programming Language (3) (F)
P: CSCI 3200 or 3310. Applied course in programming language constructs. Emphasis on run-time behavior of programs. Provides appropriate background for advanced-level courses involving formal and theoretical aspects of programming languages and compilation process.
3700. Database Management Systems (3) (F,S)
P: CSCI 3200 or 3310. Theory and techniques of relational, hierarchical, and network database management systems.
3800. Introduction to Computer Graphics (3) (F)
P: CSCI 3310 or 3510; MATH 3256 or 3584. Computer graphics systems, hardware, interactive methods; line and curve drawing; two- and three-dimensional transformations; and perspective transformation.
4000. Ethical and Professional Issues in Computer Science (1) (F,S)
To be taken by CSCI seniors in final semester. Departmental assessment and professional, ethical, legal, security, and social issues and responsibilities related to the practice of computer science.
4200. Software Engineering I (3) (WI) (F,S)
P: CSCI major and CSCI 3200 or 3310. Formal approach to state-of-the-art techniques in software design and development and application of the techniques.
4230. Software Engineering II (3) (F,S)
P: CSCI 4200 or consent of the instructor. Conceptual and practical knowledge in relation to large-scale software development using established software engineering principles. Requires completion of major project using tools and methodologies provided.
4300. Systems Programming (3) (F)
P: CSCI 3200 or 3310. Programming issues related to the functionality and general structure of operating systems, networking, security, and the general architecture of information systems are covered.
4510. Object-Oriented Computing and Graphical User Interfaces (3) (F,S)
P: CSCI 3200 or 3510. Object-oriented program design and development and data abstraction. Object-oriented programming languages. Applications to graphical user interfaces and event-driven computing.
4520. Introduction to Computer Architecture (3) (S)
P: CSCI major; CSCI 3526. Organization of basic elements of computer system, including processor, memory, control unit, and I/O units.
4530. Computer Networks and the Internet (3) (S)
P: CSCI 3200 or 3300 or consent of instructor. Theory and case studies of modern networking protocols and telecommunication methods. Local area and long-haul networks.
4540. Introduction to Mobile Communications and Wireless Security (3) (FOY)
P: CSCI 4530 or consent of instructor. Signals, access protocols, application requirements and security issues. Focus is on digital data transfer.
4550. Computer Game Development (3) (FEY)
P: CSCI 3200 or 3310. Content creation and the concepts behind the development of story, character, environment, level design, user interface, and sound.
4602. Theory of Automata and Linguistics (3) (F)
P: CSCI major; CSCI 2427. Basic concepts of automata theory and mathematical linguistics and their close interrelationship.
4627. Procedural Languages and Compilers (3) (S)
P: CSCI major; CSCI 3526, 3675. State of the art techniques for compiling procedural languages.
4630. Operating Systems I (3) (F,S)
P: CSCI major and CSCI 3200 or 3300. Job control and operating systems. System organization, resource and storage allocation, interrupt handling, addressing techniques, file structures, and batch/time sharing systems.
4710. Introduction to Developing e-Business Systems (3) (WI) (SEY)
P: CSCI 3310 or 3200 or consent of instructor. Introduces use of concepts, technologies, and building blocks from computer science, practical software engineering, and business development in building e-Commerce systems. Describes systematic life-cycle approach to developing successful e-Commerce systems and presents knowledge essential to wide range of organization and software developers. Requires completion of major term projects using state-of-the art tools and methodologies.
4905. Selected Topics in Computer Science (3)
May be repeated for maximum of 6 s.h. with change of topic. P: CSCI major and CSCI 3310 or 3200. Consideration of new or advanced topics in computer science.
5002. Logic for Mathematics and Computer Science (3) Same as MATH 5002
P: CSCI 3200 or 3310 or MATE 3223 or 2775 or MATH 2427 or 2775 or 3223 or 3256 or PHIL 3580 or equivalent. Methods of mathematical logic important in mathematics and computer science applications.
5210. Operating Systems II (3) (F)
P: CSCI 4630 or consent of instructor. Theory and practice of concurrent processes in computer operating systems. Process scheduling. Memory and auxiliary storage management.
5220. Program Translation (3) (S)
P: CSCI 4627 or consent of instructor. Formal language specification for programming languages. Advanced parsing techniques. Code generation and optimization.
5501, 5502, 5503. Independent Study (1,2,3)
Minimum of 3-6 hours per week depending on the nature of the work assigned. P: CSCI 3200 or 3310 or equivalent or consent of instructor. Advanced computer science students study topics that supplement regular curriculum.
5774. Programming for Research (3) (F)
Same as MATH 5774 For graduate student who wishes to use computer science to meet required research skills in his or her dept. May not count toward MATH major or minor. P: General statistics course or consent of instructor. Emphasis on minimum-level programming skill and use of statistical packages.
5800. Artificial Intelligence (3) (FOY)
P: CSCI 3200 or 3310 or consent of instructor. Fundamental problems and techniques of artificial intelligence. Heuristic search. Concepts of expert systems.
CSCI Banked Courses
1610. Elementary Pascal (3)
2510. Introduction to Computer Science I (3)
2610, 2611. Introduction to Computer Science II and Laboratory (4,0)
2901. Programming in ADA (1)
2902. Programming in C (1)
2903. Programming in FORTRAN (1)
3510. Data Structures (3)
3574. Numerical Analysis II (3)
4600. Systems Analysis (3)
4604. Systems Simulation (3)
5726. Scientific Programming (1)

CSDI: Speech and Hearing Sciences

Top
2100. Introduction to Communication Disorders (3) (F,S,SS)
3 lectures per week plus observation of speech therapy sessions. Scope, history, and nature of speech-language pathology and audiology. Topics include development of language and psychology of speech and hearing impaired as well as a description of etiology, symptomatology, and treatment of major speech, hearing, and language disorders.
3010. Phonetics (3) (F)
P: CSDI major or minor; CSDI 2100; PSYC 1000; or consent of instructor. Applied phonetics using International Phonetic Alphabet and pertinent modifications. Detailed descriptions of American English speech sounds and transcription of contextual speech representing mainstream and non-mainstream dialects. Transcription abilities developed to assess and treat speech disorders.
3020. Language Development (3) (F)
P: CSDI major or minor; CSDI 2100; PSYC 1000; or consent of instructor. Normal acquisition and development of language from birth through preschool years, components of language, cognitive and communicative prerequisites, and language learning theories.
3030. Speech Science: Anatomy, Physiology and Acoustics (3) (F)
3 lecture and 1 lab hours per week. P: BIOL 1050, 1051; CSDI 2100; or consent of instructor. Anatomy, physiology, and acoustic correlates of speech production mechanisms. Central and peripheral nervous systems, respiration, phonation, resonation, and articulation.
3050. Acquisition and Development of Phonology and Articulation (3) (S)
P: CSDI 3010, 3030; or consent of instructor. Emphasis on birth to five years and critical periods through the early teen years. Content areas include birth cry, babbling, cross linguistic and universal patterns of acquisition, morphophonology, metaphonology, historical and contemporary normative data issues, and interrelation of normal phonological development with other areas of language growth.
3105. Hearing Science (3) (S)
P: CSDI 3030; PHYS 1050; or consent of instructor. Basic information, including acoustics, anatomy and physiology of the ear and central auditory nervous system, and psychoacoustics.
4100. Introduction to Audiology (3) (F)
P: CSDI 3105 or consent of instructor. Concepts related to normal hearing, causes and effects of defective hearing, and hearing testing procedures.
4110. Aural Rehabilitation (3) (S)
P: CSDI 4100 or consent of instructor. Habilitation, rehabilitation of the hearing impaired as related to hearing aid use, speech-reading, auditory training, and total communication. Management philosophies related to children and adults.
4335. Apprenticeship (3) (WI) (S)
1 staffing, 1 lecture, and 3-4 lab hours per week. P: CSDI major; consent of departmental director of undergraduate studies; minimum of 25 hours observation of treatment as administered or supervised by ASHA certified speech-language pathologists/audiologists; CSDI 3020, 4100, 5010. Develop basic clinical skills through observation and apprenticeship. Apprentice serves as assistant to graduate clinicians in management of two patients. Additional responsibilities assigned as part of experience.
5010. Procedures in Clinical Management (3)
P for undergraduate students: CSDI major; CSDI 3020, 3050, 3105; or consent of instructor; P for graduate students: Consent of instructor. Procedures used in diagnostic and treatment of communication disorders. Topics include observation styles, task presentation and analysis, reinforcement techniques, group management, and intervention models. Multicultural communication models and supervised observation experiences in various clinical and public school settings.
5510, 5511, 5512. Special Problems in Speech and Hearing (2,2,2)
For advanced senior and graduate students. May be repeated for maximum of 6 s.h. May count toward the CSDI major with consent of dept chair. Independent exploration of specific areas of interest in communication disorders and research.
5565. Seminar in Augmentative Communication (3)
2 and 1/2 lecture and 1 lab hours per week. P: Consent of instructor. Interdisciplinary approach to augmentative communication. Emphasis on team approach, including discussion of and experience with patients who require use of augmentative communication systems. Areas of study include assessment, intervention, neuromotor management, environmental control, computer access, and funding.
CSDI Banked Courses
4000. Introduction to Speech Disorders (5) (F)
4020. Introduction to Language Disorders (3) (F)
5100. Introduction to Speech-Language and Hearing Disorders(2)