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Academic Affairs
Undergraduate Catalog 2007-08


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Undergraduate Courses


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GEOG: Geography

1000. Introduction to Geography (3) (F,S,SS) (FC:SO)
Basic course to field of geography. Major physical and cultural elements of environment and their influence on man’s activity.
1200. Introduction to Physical Geography (3) (F)
May not count toward foundations curriculum social sciences requirement. Fundamental processes that influence weather and climate, land form development, soil formation, water resources, and vegetative regimes with the purpose of better understanding their spatial interrelationships within human physical environment.
1250. The Water Planet (3) (F,S) (FC:SO)
Importance of water in natural world. Cultural, economic, and legal issues associated with human uses of water.
1300. Weather and Climate (4) (F,S,SS)
May not count toward foundations curriculum social sciences requirement. Nonmathematical consideration of general weather and climatic processes and patterns. Surface and middle atmospheric (jet stream) features. Emphasis on North America.
2003. Geography in the Global Economy (3) (F,S) (FC:SO)
Development of and contemporary issues in global economy from geographical perspective.
2019. Geography of Recreation (3) (F) (FC:SO)
Spatial distribution and interaction of selected recreational phenomena. Basic ideas which have emerged over last decade explored for contributions to recreational decision making.
2100. World Geography: Developed Regions (3) (F,S,SS) (FC:SO)
Introductory survey of the regions of the US and Canada, Europe, the former Soviet Union, Australia, and Japan. Emphasis on geographic aspects of physical environment, population, economy, resources, and current issues in each region.
2110. World Geography: Less Developed Regions (3) (F,S,SS) (FC:SO)
Introductory survey of regions of Latin America, Sub-Saharan Africa, North Africa and the Middle East, South Asia, Southeast Asia, and China. Emphasis on geographic aspects of physical environment, population, economy, resources, and current issues in each region.
2250. Earth Surface Systems (3) (F)
May not count toward foundations curriculum social sciences requirement. Basic understanding of natural systems operating on earth’s surface that shape the natural environment. Focuses on global distribution of land forms and vegetation. Strong emphasis on hands-on learning.
2300. Geography of Environmental Resources (3) (F)
May not count toward foundations curriculum social sciences requirement. Location and development of environmental resources at world and national levels.
2400. Spatial Data Analysis (3) (F,S)
May not count toward foundations curriculum social sciences requirement. Foundation for data management and analysis in geographic information science. Introduces quantitative expressions common to geographic information science and descriptive and inferential spatial statistics.
2410. Fundamentals of GIS (3) (F,S) Formerly GEOG 3410.
May not count toward foundations curriculum social sciences requirement. Foundations for understanding and using geographical information systems. Emphasis on creation, visualization, and analysis of geographically referenced data.
2500. Map and Aerial Photo Interpretation (3) (F,S,SS)
4 lecture hours per week. May not count toward foundations curriculum social sciences requirement. Principles of map reading and aerial photo interpretation as information sources on natural and manmade environment.
3001. Historical Geography of the United States (3)
Growth and development of US through analysis of geographic conditions.
3003. Political Geography (3) (WI) (S) (FC:SO)
Geographic factors in current national and world problems. Internal and external power, frontiers and boundaries, colonialism and neonationalism, and impact of technology.
3004. Urban Geography (3) (F)
Origin and growth of urban areas. Relationship with one another as well as size, function, and tributary territory.
3046. United States and Canada (3) (F) (FC:SO)
Intensive study of US and Canada based on analysis and comparison of regions.
3047. Western Europe (3) (S) (FC:SO)
Brief geographic survey of Europe and detailed regional study of nations located in western Europe.
3049. Latin America (3) (WI*) (FC:SO)
Geographical analysis of political, social, economic and cultural transformations in contemporary Latin America.
3050. Africa (3) (WI) (S) (FC:SO)
Physical and human background of Africa. Emphasis on political and economic role of sub-Saharan portion of continent in contemporary world.
3051. Asia (3) (S) (FC:SO)
Geographic patterns, economy, population, and role of China, Korea, Japan, India, Pakistan, and Southeast Asia in world affairs.
3055. North Carolina (3) (F) (FC:SO)
Physical and cultural survey of NC. Detailed study of geographic regions.
3056. Middle America (3) (FC:SO)
Lands and people of Caribbean, Mexico, and Central America.
3220. Soil Properties, Surveys, and Applications (3) (F)
Saturday field trip may be required. P: GEOG 2250. Physical and chemical properties of soil, soil-water relationships, soil-forming factors, county soil reports, and soil applications that involve land management decisions.
3230. Global Climates (3) (S)
May not count toward foundations curriculum social sciences requirement. P: GEOG 1300; MATH 1065; or consent of instructor. Variation in global climates as related to atmospheric circulation patterns and processes.
3250. Environmental Hazards (3) (F)
May not count toward foundations curriculum social sciences requirement. P: GEOG 1300 or 2250. Various ways people and governments respond to natural and human-induced extreme events, human behavior in threatening or actual hazards, and public policies and programs designed to control or alleviate hazards.
3420. Remote Sensing of the Environment I (3) (F)
May not count toward foundations curriculum social sciences requirement. P: GEOG 1300 or equivalent. Basic understanding of digital image data and tools required to process, analyze, and interpret digital images.
3430. Geographic Information Systems I (3) (F,S)
May not count toward foundations curriculum social sciences requirement. P: GEOG 1300 or equivalent. Computer-based decision support systems. Involves integration of spatially referenced data in problem-solving context. Concepts and application of GIS include data capture, storage, analysis, and display.
3450. Introduction to the Global Positioning System (3) (S)
May not count toward foundations curriculum social sciences requirement. P: GEOG 1300 or equivalent. Techniques for spatial referencing via a satellite-based navigation system.
3460. GIS Applications Programming (3) (F)
May not count toward foundations curriculum social sciences requirement. P: GEOG 1300; ASIP 2212 or CSCI 1610 or MIS 2223 or consent of instructor. Introduces GIS applications design, development, and deployment. Focuses on custom mapping user interfaces; programmable solutions for spatial data display, analysis and manipulation; and custom GIS applications development.
3510. Physical Meteorology (3) (F)
May not count toward foundations curriculum social sciences requirement. P: GEOG 1300; MATH 1065; or consent of instructor. Basic principles of atmospheric hydrostatics, thermodynamics, cloud and precipitation processes, and radiative transfer.
3520. Dynamic Meteorology (3) (S)
May not count toward foundations curriculum social sciences requirement. P: GEOG 1300; MATH 2172, PHYS 2360; or consent of instructor. 3 lecture hours per week. Basic concepts and techniques of mathematics, thermodynamics, mechanics and fluid dynamics in the study of atmospheric motions and weather systems.
3550. Principles of Synoptic Meteorology (3) (F)
P: GEOG 3520; or consent of instructor. Basic concepts of synoptic scale atmospheric phenomena, including upper level waves and mid-latitude weather systems.
4140. Research Methods in Human Geography (3) (S)
May not count toward foundations curriculum social sciences requirement. P: GEOG 2300; 15 s.h. in GEOG; or dept consent. Methods and techniques of field research in human geography.
4150. Advanced Spatial Analysis (3) (F)
Formerly GEOG 3400. P: GEOG 2400, 2410; or consent of instructor. Multivariate statistical methods applied to spatially referenced data with explicit concern for spatial autocorrelation and heterogeneity.
4191, 4192, 4193. Supervised Study in Regional Geography (1,2,3) (F,S,SS)
May be repeated for maximum of 6 s.h. May not count toward foundations curriculum social sciences requirement. P: Consent of instructor. Individualized study of selected aspect of regional geography under direct supervision of faculty member.
4210. Fluvial and Hydrological Processes (3) (S)
May not count toward foundations curriculum social sciences requirement. P: GEOG 1300, 2250; or consent of instructor. Comprehensive examination of principles of surface water hydrology and fluvial geomorphology. Application of principles to environmental problems.
4220. Coastal Geography (3) (WI) (S) Formerly GEOG 3002
May not count toward foundations curriculum social sciences requirement. P: GEOG 1300, 2250; or consent of instructor. Comprehensive examination of coastal systems, including beaches, dunes, and estuaries. Focuses on processes that form and maintain systems, how landforms respond to those processes, and how human activities affect the system.
4230. Earth Surface Processes (3) (WI) (F)
May not count toward foundations curriculum social sciences requirement. P: GEOG 1300, 2250; or consent of instructor. Detailed examination of dominant geomorphic processes and sediment dynamics involved in the creation of landforms. Emphasis on laboratory experimentation.
4291, 4292, 4293. Supervised Study in Physical Geography (1,2,3) (F,S,SS)
May be repeated for maximum of 6 s.h. P: Consent of instructor. Individualized study of selected aspect of physical geography under direct supervision of faculty member.
4310. Geography of Transportation and Trade (3) (S)
P: GEOG 2003. Forces leading to interaction of people and commodities between places, distribution and characteristics of transport networks, and effects of transportation flows on regions and nations.
4315. Geographic Images (3) (F) (FC:SO) Formerly GEOG 3300
Social and cultural images of space, place, and environment as produced and consumed through various media at a variety of scales.
4320. Gender, Economy, and Development (3) (S)
May not count toward foundations curriculum social sciences requirement. P: Consent of instructor. Role of gender in economic and development processes from geographical perspective.
4325. Resources, Population, and Development (3) (WI) (FC:SO) Formerly GEOG 3000
P: GEOG 2003 or consent of instructor. Demographic issues and population policies in relation to resource use and economic development from a geographical perspective.
4330. Agricultural Geography (3) (WI*) (FC:SO)
Contemporary trends in global restructuring of agro food systems in both industrialized and developing nations.
4335. Geography of Tourism (3) (FC:SO)
Traditional and emerging forms of tourism development as they transform economic, social, cultural, and environmental landscapes inside and outside the US.
4340. Introduction to Medical Geography (3) (S)
May not count toward foundations curriculum social sciences requirement. P: GEOG 2410 or consent of instructor. Topics range from geographic patterns and processes of disease to locational aspects of health care delivery systems. GIS used to describe and analyze problems in medical geography.
4345. Human Migration and Global Restructuring (3) (F)
Human migration processes associated with political and economic restructuring in different regions of the globe.
4391, 4392, 4393. Supervised Study in Human Geography (1,2,3) (F,S,SS)
May be repeated for maximum of 6 s.h. May not count toward foundations curriculum social sciences requirement. P: Consent of instructor. Individualized study of selected aspect of human geography under direct supervision of faculty member.
4410. Advanced Cartographic Design and Production (3) (F,S)
May not count toward foundations curriculum social sciences requirement. P: GEOG 2410 or equivalent experience. Continuation of GEOG 2410 at advanced level. Advanced mapping techniques such as animation. Internet mapping and production of publication-quality maps.
4420. Remote Sensing II (3) (S)
May not count toward foundations curriculum social sciences requirement. P: GEOG 3420 or consent of instructor. Interpretation of environmental phenomena remotely sensed data by sensors on board aircraft and satellites. Emphasis on learning digital image processing from remote sensing perspective.
4430. Geographic Information Systems II (3) (S)
P: GEOG 3430 or consent of instructor. Advanced topics. Emphasis on development of GIS projects.
4440. Coastal Applications of GIS (3) (F,S)
May not count toward foundations curriculum social sciences requirement. P: GEOG 2250, 2410; or consent of instructor. Application of geographic information science to coastal resource management.
4450. GIScience, Society and Technology (3) (S)
P: GEOG 2410, 3420, 3430; or consent of instructor. 3 lecture hours per week. Critical perspectives on the roles and impacts of geospatial technologies in contemporary society.
4491, 4492, 4493. Supervised Study in Geographic Techniques (1,2,3) (F,S,SS)
May be repeated for maximum of 6 s.h. May not count toward foundations curriculum social sciences requirement. P: Consent of instructor. Individualized study of selected geographic technique under direct supervision of faculty member.
4510. Meteorological Instruments and Observations (3) (F)
May not count toward foundations curriculum social sciences requirement. P: GEOG 1300; MATH 1065; or consent of instructor. 2 lecture and 3 lab hours per week. Basic principles of meteorological instruments and measurement techniques; introduction of data logging, processing, and sources of measurement error; hands-on experience in labs and group field projects.
4520. Boundary Layer Meteorology (3) (S)
May not count toward foundations curriculum social sciences requirement. P: GEOG 1300; or consent of instructor. Structure of atmospheric boundary layers and turbulence, principles of turbulent transport and diffusion processes, their measurements and modeling.
4525. Dynamic Meteorology II (3) (F)
P: GEOG 3520; MATH 4331; or consent of instructor. Applications of the governing equations of the atmosphere for the study of atmospheric waves, extratropical cyclones, and basic concepts in numerical weather prediction.
4530. Micrometeorology (3) (F)
May not count toward foundations curriculum social sciences requirement. P: GEOG 1300; or consent of instructor. Atmospheric processes at micro and local scales, including exchange processes of momentum, mass and energy, radiation budget and energy balance near the surface, soil temperature and heat transfer, turbulent transport, biosphere-atmosphere interactions, micrometeorological measurement and modeling techniques.
4540. Coastal Storms (3) (F)
May not count toward foundations curriculum social sciences requirement. P: GEOG 1300; or consent of instructor. Basic dynamics, analysis, and forecasting of extratropical and tropical storms; history of storms in the Carolinas and current mitigation plans.
4550. Applied Synoptic Meteorology: Analyses and Forecasting (3) (S)
P: GEOG 3550; or consent of instructor. Current techniques in mid-latitude weather analyses and forecasting, including chart analyses, introduction to computer meteorological analyses and visualization, numerical weather prediction, and forecast discussion, development, and evaluation.
4560. Urban Climatology (3) (F)
P: GEOG 1300; or consent of instructor. Impact of urbanization upon atmospheric processes, including energetic balance, precipitation, atmospheric circulation, and pollution.
4570. Hydrometeorology (3) (S)
May not count toward foundations curriculum social science requirement. P: GEOG 1300; or consent of instructor. Theory and observation of atmospheric processes as they relate to surface hydrology. Emphasis on measurement, prediction, and Climatology of precipitation, evapotranspiration and associated hydrologic events, such as flooding.
4580. Radar and Satellite Meteorology (3) (S)
P: GEOG 1300, 3420; or consent of instructor. History, theory and applications of radar and satellite meteorology, with a focus on techniques of satellite image interpretation and radar data processing applied to severe weather forecasting and climate analysis.
4590. Tropical Meteorology (3) (F)
P: GEOG 1300; or consent of instructor. Tropical atmosphere as a key component of global weather and climate and climate prediction. Examination of the El Niño – Southern Oscillation, the Madden Julian Oscillation, tropical cyclones and monsoons and their associated climate predictability.
4801, 4802, 4803. Geographic Internship (1,2,3) (F,S,SS)
60 hours of work responsibility for 1 s.h. credit . May be repeated for maximum of 6 s.h. May not count toward foundations curriculum social sciences requirement. P: Consent of director of geography internships; consent should be obtained during the semester prior to internship. Application of geographic principles in industrial, governmental, or business setting.
4900. Honors Research (3) (F,S)
P: Admission to GEOG honors program. Supervised reading and research in area of geography that leads to preparation of senior honors thesis proposal.
4901. Senior Honors Thesis (3) (F,S)
P: GEOG 4900 with a grade of B or higher. Extensive program of supervised research in area of geography that leads to writing of senior honors thesis.
4999. Geography Professional Seminar (1) (F,S)
P: Consent of instructor. Design and completion of professional portfolio. Examines transition from undergraduate student status to professional life or continued education.
5220. Physical Geography Field Experience (3)
10 classroom hours of orientation and organization over a 2- week period followed by 3 weeks (15 working days) in a field location. Undergraduates May not count toward foundations curriculum social sciences requirement. P: GEOG 1300, 2250; or consent of instructor. Field-based introduction to basic aspects of physical geography research. Development of research questions, field techniques, use of modern instrumentation, and geographic analysis of field data.
5281, 5282, 5283. Selected Topics in Physical Geography (1,2,3)
May be repeated for up to 6 s.h. Undergraduates May not count toward foundations curriculum social sciences requirement. P: Consent of instructor. Seminar on selected topic.
5393. Seminar in Human Geography (3)
May be repeated for up to 6 s.h. Undergraduates May not count toward foundations curriculum social sciences requirement. P: Consent of instructor. Seminar on selected topic in economic-human geography.
GEOG Banked Courses
1100. World Regional Geography (3)
1201. Introduction to Physical Geography Laboratory (1)
2009. Human Geography (3)
2201. Weather and Climate Laboratory (1)
3008. Evolution of Cartography (3)
3048. Eastern Europe (2)
3201. Land Form Analysis Laboratory (1)
3221, 3222, 3223. Natural Regions of the United States Field Studies (1,2,3)
4072. Intermediate Cartography (3)
5009. Geography of Public and Private Parkland Use (2)
5020. Spatial Efficiency Analysis (3)
5022. Theories of Industrial Location (3)
5024. Regional Development (3)
5050, 5051. Nautical Charts and Navigation (3,0)
5084. Map Compilation and Design (3)
5098. Hydrology and Water Resources (3)
5191, 5192, 5193. Seminar in Regional Geography (1,2,3)
5200. Climatology: Regions and Applications (3)
5210. Terrain Analysis (3)

GEOL: Geology

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1500. Dynamic Earth (3) (F,S,SS) (FC:SC)
Introductory survey of geologic materials (minerals and rocks), topographic features on the continents and in the ocean basins, geologic structures (faults, folds, etc.), and various processes (plate tectonics igneous activity, weathering, erosion, sedimentation, glaciation, mountain-building, etc.) that produce geologic features.
1501. Dynamic Earth Laboratory (1) (F,S,SS) (FC:SC)
3-hour lab per week. C: GEOL 1500. Study, classification, and identification of common minerals and rocks of the earth’s crust; study of various topographic features as revealed on topographic maps and aerial photographs; and study of geologic structures as seen on geologic maps, structural cross sections, and aerial photographs.
1550. Oceanography (4) (F,S) (FC:SC)
Introductory survey of geological, biological, chemical, and physical characteristics of marine environment, their interrelationships, and interaction between people and the ocean.
1600. Earth and Life Through Time (4) (F,S) (FC:SC)
Survey of physical, chemical, and biological geologic events that have occurred on earth during its long history. Chronologic arrangement of these events in world-wide geologic time scale and consideration of their causes. Major theme is organic evolution.
1700. Environmental Geology (4) (F,S) (FC:SC)
Interactions among basic geologic processes, geomorphic features, earth resources, and people whose activities are an expanding and increasingly demanding geological agent.
1800, 1801. Geology of the National Parks (4,0) (FC:SC)
3 lectures and 1 2-hour lab per week. P: GEOL 1500. Geologic evolution and scenic features in our national park system. Topics include volcanoes, caverns, sea coasts, glaciation, arid regions, and fault block mountains. Relationship of scenery to geologic processes and materials.
3050, 3051. Mineralogy and Petrology I (4,0) (F)
3 lecture and 3 lab hours per week. P: 1000-level GEOL course; RP: CHEM 1150, 1151; GEOL 1500, 1501, or consent of instructor. Systematic approach to hand-specimen study and classification of minerals and igneous, metamorphic, and sedimentary rocks.
3150, 3151. Mineralogy and Petrology II (4,0) (S)
3 lecture and 3 lab hours per week. P: GEOL 3050, 3051; P/C: CHEM 1150, 1151. Crystallographic and chemical properties of minerals and study of chemical and physical processes governing the classification, origin, and occurrence of minerals and rocks.
3200, 3201. Introduction to Field Methods (2,0) (S)
1 lecture and 1 3-hour lab per week. P: GEOL 1600. Introduces standard scientific methods of solving geologic field problems. Techniques include description, sampling, and measurement of geologic processes and sections, and principles of field mapping, utilizing the Brunton compass, aerial photographs, and plane table and alidade.
3300, 3301. Structural Geology (4,0) (F)
3 lectures and 1 3-hour lab per week. P: GEOL 3200, 3201. Structures resulting from tectonic formation of earth’s crust and intrusion of molten magma.
4000. Summer Field Course in Geology (6) (SS)
Full-time each week for the entire 6-week session. P: GEOL 3050, 3051, 3300, 3301. Stratigraphy, structure, geomorphology, and economic deposits of southwestern and central New Mexico and southern Colorado through basic mapping on topographic and photo bases. Mapping exercises involve wide variety of geologic features ranging from complexly faulted Mesozoic and Cenozoic rocks to isoclinally folded Precambrian rocks in areas of excellent exposures.
4010, 4011. Sedimentology (4,0) (WI) (F)
3 lecture and 3 lab hours per week. P: GEOL 1600, 3050, 3051. Analysis of processes and products of sedimentation. Flow mechanics and sedimentary structures, depositional systems, sedimentation and tectonics, the effects of sea level on depositional systems, methods of description and classification of sediments and sedimentary rocks, and preparation of sedimentologic field reports.
4020, 4021. Stratigraphy (3,0) (WI) (S)
2 lectures and 1 2-hour lab per week. P: GEOL 1600. Description, classification, and interpretation of stratified sedimentary rocks. Emphasis on principles and methodology.
4200, 4201. Paleontology (4,0) (WI) (S)
3 lectures and 1 3-hour lab per week. P: GEOL 1600. Fossilized remains of principal animals that lived during earth history. Emphasis on paleontologic principles, especially as applied to invertebrate fossils. Topics include population dynamics, taxonomic principles, functional morphology, paleoecology, evolution, and biostratigraphy.
4550, 4551. Honors Thesis (3,3) (F,S)
9 research hours per week. P: Junior standing with minimum cumulative 3.0 GPA; completion of minimum of 20 s.h. in GEOL; a minimum grade of C and minimum 3.0 GPA in GEOL courses. Extensive program of carefully supervised reading and research in area of geology. Written report in scientific format.
5000, 5001. Geomorphology (3,0)
2 lectures and 1 3-hour lab per week. P: GEOL 1500, 1501; an additional 4 s.h. in introductory GEOL sequences; or consent of instructor. Advanced study of landforms, stages of their development, and agencies which have shaped them.
5150. The Geologic Component of Environmental Science (3)
P: Introductory GEOL course or consent of instructor. Basic geologic knowledge and insights that support sound, rational, and science-based environmental decisions and policies in regard to land and water use. Topics include pollution abatement, clean up, and prevention; resource extraction, use, and conservation; and hazardous geologic processes.
5300. Geology of Coastal Processes and Environments (3)
May include field trips to various coastal systems. P: GEOL 1550, 4010, 4011; or consent of instructor. Modern coastal systems. Diversity and distribution, complexity and dynamics of interacting processes and responses, origin and evolutionary history, and role of man as major modifying force.
5350. Marine Geology (3)
P: GEOL 1550, 4010, 4011; or consent of instructor. Geology of world’s ocean basins. Impact of geophysical, geochemical, and geobiological principles on concepts of origin and evolution of ocean basins; source, transportation, and deposition of marine sediments and formation of marine stratigraphic record; and role of oceanographic processes affecting earth history such as sea level fluctuation, plate tectonics, paleogeography, and paleoclimatology.
5400, 5401. Optical Mineralogy (3,0)
2 lectures and 1 3-hour lab per week. P: GEOL 3050, 3051. Theory and basic techniques for determining optical constants of crystals using a polarizing microscope and thin sections.
5450. Introduction to Aqueous Geochemistry (3)
2 lectures and 1 3-hour lab per week. P: CHEM 1150, 1151, 1160, 1161; or equivalent. Applies chemical principles to study of elements at earth’s surface; their transportation in aqueous solutions; and weathering, groundwater, and surface water chemistry, geochemical cycles, and distribution of stable isotopes.
5500, 5510, 5520. Directed Studies in Geology (2,2,2)
P: Senior or graduate standing in GEOL or consent of instructor. Independent study on selected topic. May include field work, directed readings, or some combination thereof. Occasionally special field study or course offered using one of these course numbers.
5600, 5601. Economic Geology (3,0)
2 lectures and 1 3-hour lab per week. P: GEOL 3050, 3051. Genesis, mode of occurrence, and utilization of mineral resources. Metals, nonmetals, and basic energy resources such as petroleum, coal, and uranium. Emphasis on geology of these resources and their relationship to modern technological society.
5700, 5701. Geohydrology of Drainage Basins (3,0)
2 lectures and 1 3-hour lab per week. P: GEOL 1500, 1501; or consent of instructor. Drainage basin geology and hydrology. Emphasis on quantitative analysis, evaporation, streamflow, and hydrologic parameters of surface water and ground water basins.
5710, 5711. Ground Water Hydrology (3,0)
2 lectures and 1 3-hour lab per week. P: GEOL 1500, 1501; or consent of instructor. Origin, occurrence, movement, quality, regional analysis, and management of ground water. Interrelationship of ground and surface water. Lab emphasis on aquifer test data collection and interpretation.
GEOL Banked Courses
1601. Historical Geology Laboratory (1)
2101. Interpretation of Geologic Maps (1)
3000, 3001. Mineralogy (4,0)
3100, 3101. Petrology (4,0)
3400, 3401. Geologic Field Studies of the Coastal Plain (3,0)
3402. Engineering Geology (3)
4100, 4101. Sedimentation and Stratigraphy (4,0)
5050. Regional Geomorphology of the United States (2)
5250, 5251. Stratigraphy (3,0)
5750, 5751. Introduction to Engineering Geology (3,0)

GERM: German

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1001. German Level I (3)
Lab work. Recommended early in college career for BA students and potential GERM majors and minors. First of four-course sequence. Intensive training in basic skills of understanding, speaking, reading, and writing German. Focus on life and culture of German-speaking world.
1002. German Level II (3)
Lab work. Recommended early in college career for BA students and potential GERM majors and minors. P: GERM 1001 or placement in 1002 by German placement test. Second of four-course sequence. Further intensive training in basic skills of understanding, speaking, reading, and writing German. Focus on life and culture of German-speaking world.
1003. German Level III (3)
Lab work. Recommended early in college career for BA students and potential GERM majors and minors. P: GERM 1002 or placement in 1003 by German placement test. Third of four-course sequence. Intensive training leading to more advanced levels of achievement in understanding, speaking, reading, and writing German. Focus on life and culture of German-speaking world.
1004. German Level IV (3)
Lab work may be required. Recommended early in college career for BA students and potential GERM majors and minors. P: GERM 1003 or placement in 1004 by German placement test. Fourth of four-course sequence. Further intensive training leading to intermediate-level proficiency in understanding, speaking, reading, and writing German. Readings and discussions to further acquaint student with life, literature, and culture of German-speaking world.
2210. Intermediate German Composition and Conversation I (3)
P: GERM 1004 or consent of instructor. Intensive development of oral skills for use in everyday situations, vocabulary growth, listening comprehension, and correctness in grammar. Practice in task-oriented compositions and comprehensive review of grammatical forms and usage.
2211. Intermediate German Composition and Conversation II (3)
P: GERM 1004 or consent of instructor. Practice in spoken and written language with emphasis on developing students’ writing skills and increasing knowledge of contemporary culture. Makes use of variety of print and multimedia texts, including literature, newspaper, magazines, film, television and world wide web.
2300. Introduction to German Literature (3) (FC:HU)
P: GERM 1004 or consent of instructor. Develop reading skills necessary for understanding genre, concepts of literary structure, and criticism through analysis of selected writings.
2420. Culture of the German-Speaking World (3) (FC:HU)
P: GERM 1004 or consent of instructor. Selected contemporary aspects of cultures of German-speaking world through reading and discussion of selected texts.
2611. Early Experiences for the Prospective Teacher (1)
For prospective teachers. Minimum of 16 hours of directed observations and planned participation in appropriate school environments and 8 hours of seminar class instruction in the teaching area. May not count toward BA or minor. Introduces teaching of German.
2700. Special Topics in German Studies (3)
P: GERM 1004 or consent of dept chair. Selected topics related to language, literature, culture, or civilization of German-speaking countries. Topics vary.
3110. German Business Communication (3)
P: GERM 2210 or 2211; or consent of instructor. Working knowledge of oral and written German as used in business world. Preparation for dealing effectively with business German in the US and abroad.
3120. German Business Communication II (3) (WI)
P: GERM 2210 or 2211; or consent of instructor. Introduces students to contemporary topics impacting business in German-speaking countries. Prepares students to apply for a job or internship with a German-language company.
3210. Conversation (3)
P: GERM 2210 or 2211; or consent of instructor. Direct and systematic use of spoken language. Intensive approach for developing functional levels of communication in German.
3330. Composition and Advanced Grammar (3) (WI)
P: GERM 2210 or 2211; or consent of instructor. Principles of effective writing in German and advanced review of grammar. Emphasis on syntax, forms, and usage.
3340. Civilization of the German-Speaking World (3) (FC:HU)
P: GERM 2210 or 2211 or consent of instructor. Survey of cultural development of German-speaking peoples from Germanic tribes to reunification of East and West Germany through reading and discussing significant texts.
3350. Introduction to Translation Studies (3) (WI)
For students of all disciplines who expect to do specialized reading or research work in German. P: GERM 2210 or 2211; or consent of instructor. Translating skills from German to English. Emphasis on grammar and style, approaches to vocabulary learning, and decoding difficult structures. Readings from areas of general knowledge.
3400. German Drama (3) (FC:HU)
P: GERM 2210 or 2211, 2300; or consent of instructor. Survey of representative German dramas from Lessing to the present.
3500. Nineteenth-Century Prose: The Novella (3) (FC:HU)
P: GERM 2210 or 2211, 2300; or consent of instructor. Survey of representative literary works of the German novella from Classicism to the early twentieth century.
3520. The German-Speaking World from the Beginning to the Nineteenth Century (3) (FC:HU)
P: GERM 2210 or 2211, 2300; or consent of instructor. Emphasis on literary masterpieces.
3530. The German-Speaking World of the Nineteenth Century (3) (WI) (FC:HU)
P: GERM 2210 or 2211, 2300; or consent of instructor. Emphasis on literary masterpieces.
3540. The German-Speaking World from 1900 to 1945 (3) (WI*) (FC:HU)
P: GERM 2210 or 2211, 2300; or consent of instructor. Emphasis on literary masterpieces.
3550. The Contemporary German-Speaking World (3) (WI) (FC:HU)
P: GERM 2210 or 2211, 2300; or consent of instructor. Emphasis on literary masterpieces.
3600. German Poetry (3)
P: GERM 2210 or 2211, 2300; or consent of instructor. Survey of representative German poetic literature from the Middle Ages to the present.
3700. Special Topics (3)
May be repeated for maximum of 6 s.h. with change of topic. P: GERM 2210 or 2211; or consent of instructor. Topics relating to language, literature, culture, or civilization of a German-speaking country. Topics vary.
4350. Phonetics and History of the German Language (3)
P: GERM 3210 or consent of dept chair. Introduces Germanic linguistics and history of German language. Emphasis on phonetics of modern German.
4361. German Literature of the Eighteenth Century (3)
P: GERM 2210 or 2211, 2300; or consent of instructor. Survey of representative texts of the eighteenth century.
4362. The Classic Period (3)
P: GERM 2210 or 2211, 2300; or consent of instructor. Survey of texts representative of German classicism.
4363. German Romanticism (ca. 1790-ca. 1830) (3)
P: GERM 2210 or 2211, 2300; or consent of instructor. Survey of texts representative of German Romanticism.
4500. Popular Culture and Literature (3) (WI)
P: GERM 2210 or 2211, 2300; or consent of instructor. Explores and contextualizes popular culture in Germany using audio-visual, literary, historical, and theoretical texts.
4510. Post-Unification Culture and Literature (3) (WI)
P: GERM 2210, 2211, 2300; or consent of instructor. Explores cultural trends after the 1989 fall of the Berlin Wall using literary, historical, and audio-visual texts.
4611. Teaching Second Languages in Grades K-12 (5)
5 lectures per week and 10 lab hours per semester. Includes 10 hours of field experience. May not count toward BA or minor. P: Admission to upper division; 18 s.h. above GERM 1004 or consent of instructor. Modern methodologies, techniques and strategies, instructional resources, and evaluation procedures for teaching second languages in grades K-12.
4700. Special Topics in German Studies (3)
May be repeated for a maximum of 6 s.h. with change of topic. P: Consent of dept chair. Selected topics relating to the language, literature, culture, or civilization of the German-speaking world. Topics vary.
4880. Internship in German (10)
Full-time, semester-long internship. P: Admission to upper division; GERM 2210, 2211, 2420, 3210, 3330; 6 s.h. GERM literature above 2999; 12 s.h. GERM electives above 2999. Observation and supervised internship in assigned German K-12 public school classroom.
4881. Internship Seminar: Issues in German Teaching (1)
P: Admission to upper division; C: GERM 4880. Individualized study of problems or issues related to teaching German.
4882, 4883, 4884. Internship for Professions (1,1,1)
Supervised internship in appropriate professional setting during junior or senior year of German degree program. P: Consent of dept chair. Fields may include but are not limited to business and industry.
4950, 4951, 4952, 4953, 4954. Directed Readings in German (1 each)
P: Consent of dept chair. In-depth exploration of selected aspect of German culture (literature, civilization, etc.).
4990. Honors (3)
P: Minimum 3.5 GPA in German. Independent study under direction of faculty member in student’s major area of interest. Research paper required.
5700. Selected Topics (3)
May be repeated for maximum of 6 s.h. with change of topic. P: Consent of dept chair. Selected topics relating to language, literature, culture, or civilization of a German-speaking country. Topics vary.
GERM Banked Courses
1050. Introduction to German Lyric Literature (3)
2100. German Conversation (3)
2220. Modern German Drama in Translation: The Theatre in Protest (3)
4100. The Modern German Novel (3)
4319. Teaching Foreign Languages in the Middle Grades (3)
4387. The Baroque Era (ca. 1600-ca. 1750) (3)

GERO: Gerontology

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2400. Introduction to Gerontology (3) (FC:SO) Same as CDFR 2400; SOCW 2400
May count toward either the SOCI major or minor or foundations curriculum social sciences requirement. Current theory and research from interdisciplinary perspective.
5400. Seminar in Aging Studies (3) Same as CDFR 5400; SOCW 5400
Entry point for graduate certificate in gerontology; exit course for undergraduate minor in gerontology. P: Consent of instructor. Topics include historical perspective on aging issues, normal aging and pathology, aging program administration, aging policy development, research in gerontology, rural aging, and aging and ethnicity.
5903. Readings in Aging Studies (3) Same as CDFR 5903; SOCW 5903
May count as 3 s.h. toward baccalaureate minor in GERO or graduate certificate in GERO. P: Consent of instructor and chair of instructor’s home unit. Selected readings from monographs or journals. Focus on specialized areas in which student has taken one or more courses in either baccalaureate gerontology minor or graduate gerontology certificate.
GERO Banked Courses
4600, 4601. Practicum in Gerontology (3,3)
5901, 5902. Readings in Aging Studies (1,2)

GRBK: Great Books

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2000. Introduction to the Great Books (3) (F) (FC:HU)
May be repeated once with a change of topic for a maximum of 6 s.h. Moderated discussion featuring close reading of fundamental works of humanities, arts, and sciences. Students make reasoned arguments in class discussions. Content varies by semester’s topic, but typically includes selections from thinkers across the ages whose writings have shaped modern thought.
3001. Great Books of Science (3)
May not count toward foundations curriculum requirement. May be repeated once with a change of topic for a maximum of 6 s.h. Founding texts of the origins, development, and implications of science and scientific thought from the Greeks to the present.
4000. Seminar in the Great Books (3) (S) (FC:HU)
May be repeated once with a change of topic for a maximum of 6 s.h. P: GRBK 2000 or consent of instructor. Seminar featuring close reading of fundamental works of humanities, arts, and sciences. Students will make reasoned arguments in class discussions. Content will typically include selections from thinkers across the ages whose writings have shaped modern thought.
4999. Thesis in the Great Books (3) (F,S) (WI) (FC:HU)
May include supervised readings as appropriate to topic and student. Capstone experience supervised by faculty mentor. Paper or idea from earlier course work developed into complete thesis.

GRK: Greek

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1001. Ancient Greek Level I (3)
First of two-course sequence. Training in principles of Greek grammar. Emphasis on reading skills. Correct pronunciation taught, but no other oral skills required. All communication in English.
1002. Ancient Greek Level II (3)
P: GRK 1001 or consent of instructor. Second of two-course sequence. Completion of basic skills of Greek grammar. Elementary readings introduced and adjusted to student’s level.
1003. Ancient Greek Level III (3)
P: GRK 1002 or consent of instructor. Intensive review and application of basic skills of grammar acquired in GRK 1001-1002. Development of reading skills through works of major authors such as Plato, Xenophon, or Lysias.
1004. Ancient Greek Level IV (3)
P: GRK 1003 or consent of instructor. Continued development of reading skills. Introduction to critical approaches to literature. Readings in poetry from plays of Euripides.
3001. Homer and Hesiod (3) (FC:HU) Formerly GRK 2021
P: GRK 1004 or consent of instructor. Readings in ancient Greek from Homer’s Iliad and Odyssey and from Hesiod’s Works and Days and Theogony.
3002. Age of Herodotus (3) (FC:HU) Formerly GRK 2022
P: GRK 3001 or consent of instructor. Readings in ancient Greek from Herodotus’ Histories, the plays of Sophocles and Aristophanes, and from Dialogues of Plato.
3330. Greek Prose Composition (3)
RP: GRK 3001. Advanced instruction in Classical Greek grammar and style through daily translation from English into Classical Greek.
3700. Selected Topics in Ancient Greek (3)
P: GRK 3001 or consent of Instructor. May be repeated for a maximum of 6 s.h. with change of topic. Selected topics relating to Classical Greek texts of the literature, culture, or civilization of the ancient Mediterranean world.
4001. Athenian Drama (3) (FC:HU)
P: GRK 3002 or consent of instructor. Readings in Ancient Greek from the tragedies of Aeschylus, Sophocles and Euripides, and the comedies of Aristophanes and Menander.
4002. Classical Greek Prose Authors (3) (FC:HU)
P: GRK 4001 or consent of instructor. Readings in Ancient Greek oratory, history and philosophy.
4521, 4522, 4523. Directed Readings in Greek (1,2,3)
May be repeated. P: Consent of instructor. In-depth exploration of selected aspect of Greek culture (literature, civilization, etc.).