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Academic Affairs
Undergraduate Catalog 2007-08


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Undergraduate Courses


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PHIL: Philosophy

1110. Introduction to Philosophy (3) (WI*) (F,S,SS) (FC:HU)
Introduces some of the main philosophical questions about knowledge, existence, and value, e.g. What can we be certain of? Does God exist? What is the difference between right and wrong? Selected readings from major philosophers.
1175. Introduction to Ethics (3) (WI*) (F,S,SS) (FC:HU)
Introduces major ethical theories and to questions such as: What is justice? What is virtue? What are human rights? What is happiness?
1176. Introduction to Social and Political Philosophy (3) (WI*) (F,S) (FC:HU)
Philosophical basis of main social, political, and economic systems. Classic issues such as civil disobedience, justification of revolution, institution of private property, and redistribution of wealth.
1180. Introduction to Critical Reasoning (3) (WI*) (F) (FC:HU)
Introduces non-symbolic logic. Topics may include how to recognize simple valid arguments, avoid common fallacies, define terms, criticize arguments, and answer objections.
1262. Introduction to Philosophical Issues in Biology (3) (FC:HU)
Introduces philosophical thinking and writing by study of issues at foundations of contemporary biology. Topics may include philosophical import of evolutionary theory, nature of scientific justification, reductionism versus holism in biological theory, and ethical issues in biological research.
1263. Introduction to Philosophical Issues in Psychology (3) (FC:HU)
Introduces philosophical thinking and writing by study of issues at foundations of psychology. Topics may include competing models of mind (biological, information processing, holistic), nature of scientific justification, pharmacological versus more traditional methods in psychiatry and clinical psychology, and ethical issues in psychological research.
1275. Contemporary Moral Problems (3) (FC:HU) (WI*)
Philosophical consideration of some central moral problems of modern society and civilization, such as abortion, euthanasia, war, sexual morality, government paternalism, reverse discrimination, animal rights, environmental ethics, and capital punishment. Topics vary.
1290. Introduction to Philosophy of Religion (3) (F) (FC:HU)
Analysis of some main concepts, arguments, and issues in philosophy of religion. Topics include meaning of religious language, arguments for existence of God, problem of evil, miracles, and meaning of religious experience.
1311. Great Philosophers from Antiquity to the Present (3) (FC:HU)
Focuses on several philosophers, each from different historical periods. Emphasis on selections from their writings and their influence. Historical periods include Ancient, Medieval, and Modern Periods and nineteenth and twentieth centuries.
1500. Introduction to Logic (3) (F,S,SS) (FC:HU or MA)
Introduces basic logical notions: statement, argument, validity, consistency, and proof. Various methods for analyzing these notions. Translation of natural language statements into logical system and other topics.
1690. World Religions (3) (F,S) (FC:HU)
Historical and contemporary expressions of major living religions, such as Buddhism, Christianity, Hinduism, Islam, Judaism, and Taoism.
1695. Introduction to the Old Testament (3) (F) (FC:HU)
History, literature, and religion of ancient Israel.
1696. Introduction to the New Testament (3) (S) (FC:HU)
History, literature, and religion of early Christianity.
2261. Introduction to Philosophy of Science (3) (FC:HU)
Investigation into nature of science and scientific method. Topics include nature of scientific theories, existence of theoretical entities, structure of space-time, and causality.
2271. Introduction to Philosophy of Art (3) (WI*) (F,S) (FC:HU)
Introduces classical and current philosophical theories explaining the nature and value of art. Emphasis on general understanding of such theories and their application to the art world. Past and current developments in philosophy linked with work and theories of currently influential artists and historical figures in the arts.
2274. Business Ethics (3) (WI*) (F,S,SS) (FC:HU)
Survey of main theories of normative ethics and their application to moral issues that arise in business, such as employee rights and responsibilities, honesty in advertising, trade secrecy, and corporate social responsibility.
2275. Professional Ethics (3) (WI*) (F,S,SS) (FC:HU)
Concept of a professional and obligations of professionals to their clients and others. Survey of related ethical issues in law, accounting, health care, engineering, education, scientific research, etc.
2280. Introduction to Philosophy of Sport (3) (FC:HU)
Introduces philosophy of sport through study of philosophical writings relevant to sport and contemporary writings in philosophy of sport.
2282. Philosophy of Law (3) (S) (FC:HU) (WI*)
Explores philosophical topics arising from study and application of legal principles, such as nature of law and obligation, civil liberties, rights, and theories of punishment.
2451. American Philosophy (3) (FC:HU)
Major themes in American philosophy and/or major American philosophers, such as Emerson, Peirce, James, Dewey and later Americans.
2453. Existentialism and Phenomenology (3) (FC:HU)
Study of representative writers from late nineteenth and twentieth-century tradition of existentialism and phenomenology, such as Nietzsche, Kierkegaard, Husserl, Sartre, and Heidegger.
2455. Introduction to Africana Philosophy (3) (WI*) (FC:HU)
Introduces philosophy rooted in the traditions and experience of Africa and the African Diaspora. Topics may include philosophy and slavery, the philosophy of Alain Locke, contemporary African American philosophy, and African metaphysics, epistemology and aesthetics.
2691. Classical Islam (3) (FC:HU)
Islam and some of its cultural manifestations during the formative period. Topics covered include early history, basic beliefs and practices, and the Qur’an.
2692. Buddhism (3) (FC:HU)
Buddhism during the formative period. Topics covered include early history, formation of the canon, basic philosophy, initial spread through Asia, and basic practices such as mediation and pilgrimage.
3255. Philosophy of Mind (3) (FC:HU)
P: 3 s.h. in PHIL or consent of instructor. Philosophical problems concerning the mind, such as intentionality and subjectivity of our mental states. Nature of psychology and cognitive sciences and their implications for philosophy.
3260. Epistemology (3) (F) (FC:HU)
P: 3 s.h. in PHIL or consent of instructor. Philosophical examination of issues related to knowledge and acceptable belief. Topics may include role of experience, perception, sensation, and reasoning in generating knowledge or acceptable, true beliefs, and extent to which our various knowledge seeking activities (such as pursuit of scientific methodologies) succeed in producing what is being sought.
3272. Aesthetics (3) (FC:HU)
P: 3 s.h. in PHIL or consent of instructor. Philosophical examination of issues such as nature and foundation of aesthetic value, relevance of aesthetics to current developments in art world, whether the concept of art is an evolving concept, and relevance of artist’s intention to nature and value of art.
3281. Introduction to Philosophical Ethics in the Health Care Professions (3) (WI*) (FC:HU)
Survey of moral problems pertaining to study and practice of medical sciences and study of philosophical concepts and methods as they pertain to those problems.
3290. Philosophy of Religion (3) (S) (FC:HU)
P: 3 s.h. in PHIL or consent of instructor. Topics discussed in PHIL 1290 pursued thoroughly. Ramifications and implications of opposing positions and arguments.
3313. Ancient Philosophy (3) (WI*) (FC:HU)
P: 3 s.h. in Phil or consent of instructor. Study of major writings of ancient period, such as those of the Pre-Socratics, Plato, Aristotle, Epicurus.
3321. Medieval and Renaissance Philosophy (3) (FC:HU)
P: 3 s.h. in PHIL or consent of instructor. Representative writings of significant philosophers in the Medieval and Renaissance periods, such as Augustine, Anselm, Aquinas, and Machiavelli.
3331. Modern Philosophy (3) (FC:HU)
P: 3 s.h. in philosophy or consent of instructor. Critical examination of the ideas of the great European philosophers of the 17th and 18th centuries: such as Descartes, Locke, Berkeley, Leibniz, Spinoza, Hume and Kant.
3340. Twentieth-Century Analytic Philosophy (3) (FC:HU)
P: 3 s.h. in PHIL or consent of instructor. Major movements, themes, and figures in mainstream of philosophy from 1900 to present, such as Russell, Wittgenstein, Quine, and Austin.
3350. Great Philosopher (3) (F) (FC:HU)
May be repeated for credit with change of topic. P: 3 s.h. in PHIL or consent of instructor. Intensive study of a great philosopher. Selected from such major figures as Plato, Aristotle, Augustine, Aquinas, Descartes, Leibniz, Kierkegaard, Sartre.
3519, 3520, 3521. Directed Readings (1,2,3) (3521:WI*) (F,S,SS) (FC:HU)
May be repeated for credit with consent of instructor and dept chair. P: Consent of directing professor and dept chair. Independent study of particular topic for which general department curriculum does not provide adequate opportunity.
3550. Junior Honors (3) (F,S,SS)
May be repeated for credit. P: Consent of instructor and dept chair.
3580. Intermediate Logic (3) (FC:HU or MA)
P: PHIL 1500 or MATH major or consent of instructor. Review of propositional logic. Logical notions of validity, consistency, and proof are extended to predicate logic. Emphasis on derivations in this system. Other topics may be included.
3690. Women and Religion (3) (WI*) (FC:HU)
Historical and contemporary situation of women in major religious traditions. Special emphasis on Judaism and Christianity.
3691. Islam in the Modern World (3) (WI*) (FC:HU)
P: PHIL 1690 or PHIL 2691 or consent of instructor. Contemporary issues of war and peace, gender issues, fundamentalism, modernity, and religious identity.
3692. Tibetan Religion and Culture (3) (WI*) (FC:HU)
P: PHIL 1690 or PHIL 2692 or consent of instructor. Influence of Buddhist and Bon religions on Tibetan culture.
3698. Mysticism (3) (WI*) (FC:HU)
P: Consent of instructor or any course from the core religion electives list of the religious studies program. Mystical traditions in various religions. Topics include historical and religious contexts, representative mystics, and classic texts.
4250. Metaphysics (3) (FC:HU)
P: 6 s.h. in PHIL or consent of instructor. Inquiry concerning philosophical questions about reality, the world, the mind, God, universals, essences, and substances.
4270. Ethics (3) (WI*) (FC:HU)
P: 6 s.h. in PHIL or consent of instructor. Intensive study of particular issue or theory, such as meaning and justification of ethical statements, utilitarianism, responsibility, blame, and punishment.
4276. Social and Political Philosophy (3) (WI*) (FC:HU)
P: 6 s.h. in PHIL or consent of instructor. Analysis of conceptual problems and normative questions that arise in social and political philosophy. Foci may include justice theory, injustice theory, the philosophy of family, or theories of political obligation.
4282. Mathematical Logic (3) (FC:HU)
P: PHIL 3580 or MATH major or consent of instructor. Focuses on rigorous proof of consistency and completeness of first order of predicate logic. Other topics may include proofs of adequacy of various sets of operators to express all truth functions, theory of identity, discussion of incompleteness of arithmetic, decidability and undecidability results, contrasts between objectual and substitutional quantification, and contrasts between natural deduction and axiomatic systems.
4283. Philosophy of Language (3) (S) (FC:HU)
P: 6 s.h. in PHIL or consent of instructor. Problems of meaning, truth, reference, necessity, naming, concepts, propositions, speech acts, semantic theories, and nature of language.
4550. Senior Honors (3) (F,S,SS)
May be repeated for credit. P: Consent of instructor and dept chair.
4699. Topics in Religion (3) (WI*) (FC:HU)
P: 6 s.h. in religion or philosophy or consent of instructor. May be repeated for a maximum of 9 s.h. with change of topic. Selected topics of religious studies.
5531, 5532, 5533. Directed Readings (1,2,3) (F,S,SS)
May be repeated for credit with consent of directing professor and dept chair. P: Consent of directing professor and dept chair.
PHIL Banked Courses
2272. Philosophical Perspectives of Sex (3)
2273. Philosophy and Education (3)
3311. Plato (3)
3312. Aristotle (3)
3332. Empiricism (3)
4331. Continental Rationalism (3)
4333. Kant and German Idealism (3)
4441. Analytic Philosophy (3)
5273. Reasoning Skills in Elementary Education (3)
5285. Philosophical Problems in the Health Care Professions (3)

PHYS: Physics

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1050. Physics and the Environment (4) (F,S,SS) (FC:SC)
Basic principles of physics and their uses and consequences in the world and our lives. Comprises, along with PHYS 1080, 1081 or 1090, 1091, a nonmathematical science sequence designed primarily for nonscience majors.
1080, 1081. Physics and the Universe (3,1) (F,S) (FC:SC)
3 lecture and 2 lab hours per week. C for 1081: PHYS 1080. Nonmathematical study of universe from earth to galaxies. Topics include appearance of sky, physical nature of moon and planets, birth and evolution of stars, and galaxies.
1090. Physics of Sound (3) (S) (FC:SC)
Musical sound, including its properties, production, behavior, and reproduction. Topics include basic physical principles, sound reception and the ear, basic acoustics, and sound production by musical instruments.
1091. Physics of Sound Laboratory (1) (S) (FC:SC)
2 lab hours per week. C: PHYS 1090.
1250, 1260. General Physics (3,3) (F,S,SS) (FC:SC)
P for 1250: MATH 1065 or 1066; P for 1260: PHYS 1250. Basic principles of physics, including mechanics, heat, thermodynamics, electricity, magnetism, light, wave motion, and modern developments in physics.
1251, 1261. General Physics Laboratory (1,1) (F,S,SS) (FC:SC)
2 lab hours per week. C for 1251: PHYS 1250 or 2350; C for 1261: 1260 or 2360. Experiments involving general concepts.
2021. Experimental Physics (1) (F-04)
3 lab hours per week. P: PHYS 1261, 2360. Experiments involving basic electricity and digital electronics concepts.
2350, 2360. University Physics (4,4) (F,S,SS) (FC:SC)
P: MATH 2121 or 2171; P for PHYS 2360: PHYS 2350. Calculus-based introduction to basic principles of physics. Mechanics, thermodynamics, electricity and magnetism, optics, and modern physics.
3516, 3517, 3518. Problems in Physics (1,1,1)
Equivalent of 1 lecture hour per week. P: Consent of instructor and dept chair. Research under faculty supervision.
3700, 3701. Advanced Laboratory (3,0) (3700:WI) (S)
1 lecture and 6 lab hours per week. P: PHYS 2360. Advanced experimental physics. Major writing requirement.
3716, 3717, 3718. Advanced Physics Laboratory (1,2,3)
Equivalent of 2, 4, or 6 hours of lab work per week. May be repeated for maximum of 9 s.h. P: Consent of instructor and dept chair. Experiments and investigations to supplement any physics course.
4080, 4081. Astronomy (3,0)
2 lecture and 2 lab hours per week. P: PHYS 2360. Astronomy as birthplace of great concepts of physics. Nature of solar system, stars, and galaxies.
4120. Thermodynamics (3) (S-OY)
P: PHYS 2360. Topics include laws of thermodynamics with applications and introduction to kinetic theory and statistical mechanics.
4226. Mechanics I (3) (F)
P: MATH 2173; PHYS 2360. Topics include motion of particle and system of particles, statics of rigid bodies, gravitation, and moving coordinate systems.
4227. Mechanics II (3)
P: PHYS 4226. Topics include mechanics of continuous media, Lagrange’s and Hamilton’s equations, rigid body rotations, and theory of small vibrations.
4310. Modern Optics (3) (F-EY)
P: PHYS 2360. Topics include image information and ray theory, wave optics, optical transformation theory, and quantum optics.
4326. Electricity and Magnetism I (3) (F)
P: MATH 2173; PHYS 2360. Topics include electrostatics, dielectrics, electric current, magnetic properties of steady currents and of matter, and electromagnetic induction.
4327. Electricity and Magnetism II (3)
P: PHYS 4326. Topics include properties of slowly varying currents, Maxwell’s equations, and electromagnetic waves.
4416. Modern Physics I (3) (F)
P: PHYS 2360. Topics include special relativity, early quantum theory, solution to the Schrodinger equation, and theory of hydrogen atom and complex atoms.
4417. Modern Physics II (3) (S)
P: PHYS 4416. Topics include nuclear models, elementary particles, quantum statistics, molecular structure, solid-state physics, and astrophysics.
4560. Mathematical Methods for Physics (3) (S)
P: MATH 2173; PHYS 2360. Vector calculus, matrix applications, tier series, complex variables, and numerical methods.
4610. Electronics (3) (F-OY)
2 lecture and 2 lab hours per week. P: PHYS 2021, 2360. Theoretical and experimental survey of electric and electronic circuits.
5311. Mathematical Physics I (3) Same as MATH 5311
P: MATH 4331; PHYS 2360; or consent of instructor. Mathematical methods important in physics. Emphasis on application. Functions of complex variables, ordinary and partial differential equations, integrals and integral transforms, and special functions.
5400. Quantum Mechanics I (3)
P: Intermediate modern physics. Fundamentals of quantum theory as applied to atomic and molecular systems.
5600, 5601. Modern Electronics (3,0)
2 lecture and 2 lab hours per week. P: PHYS 4610. Theory and application of modern electronic devices. Circuit design using linear, nonlinear, and hybrid integrated circuits and their application in a graphical (GUI), computer-based environment for scientific instrument and process control.
5700. Health Physics (3)
P: PHYS 2600, 4417; or consent of instructor. Broad spectrum of topics in radiation protection. Emphasis on interactions of radiation with matter, methods of radiation detection, dosimetry, principles of shielding, and regulations pertaining to work with radiation.
5715. Biomedical Physics (3)
P: BIOL 1050; CHEM 1160; PHYS 2360; or consent of instructor. Applications of physics principles in biology and medicine. Topics include statistical analysis, biomechanics, structure of cells and membranes, transport in medium and through membranes, interaction of photons and charged particles with biological systems.
5900, 5901. Computational Physics (3,0)
1 lecture and 4 lab hours per week. P: MATH 4331; PHYS 2360 or 5311. Application of modern computer program with symbolic, numerical, and graphical capabilities to problems in physics.
PHYS Banked Courses
1011. Experimental Physics I (1)
1021. Experimental Physics II (1)
1061. Experimental Physics (1)
1070. Physics and Man (3)
1100. Introduction to Physics and Engineering (3)
2011. Experimental Physics III (1)
2250, 2260, 2270. Advanced General Physics (3,3,3)
2600, 2601. Introduction to Health Physics (3,0)
3100. Topics for Secondary School Teachers (3)
3650, 3651. Medical Instrumentation (3,0)
3860, 3861. Introduction to Instrument-Computer Interfacing (2,1)
4110. Applied Thermodynamics (3)
5060. The Conceptual Development of Physics (3)
5321. Applied Mathematics I (3)
5350. Modern Optics (3)
5610. Applied Electromagnetism (3)
5630. Gaseous Conductors (3)
5640, 5641. Solar Energy (3,0)
5710, 5711. Topics in Health Physics I (3,0)
5720, 5721. Topics in Health Physics II (3,0)
5800. Biophysics (2)

PLAN: Planning

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1900. Planning for the Human Environment (3) (F,S,SS)
Theories, concepts, and methodologies used to plan for man and environment. Planning process examined in context of urban, regional, environmental, site, and institutional scenarios.
3015. Planning for Circulation (3) (S)
Theories and principles involved in planning for circulatory systems in urban and regional settings. Historical aspects of circulation, overview of planning concerns, and discussion of practice of planning as related to transportation.
3018, 3028, 3038. Planning Internship (1,2,3) (F,S,SS)
Minimum of 50 hours of professional work responsibility per semester hour of credit. P: Completion of a minimum of 9 s.h. of planning courses and consent of internship coordinator based upon student’s submitting written proposal indicating applicability of planning internship to his or her educational and professional objectives. Supervised experience with professional planning personnel in approved agency or organization.
3020. Environmental Planning (3) (F)
Concepts and issues of environment in relation to planning and management principles and practices.
3021. Introduction to Planning Techniques (3) (F)
2 lecture and 2 lab hours per week. Communication, computation, data analysis, and other analytical techniques for effective urban and regional planning.
3022. History and Theory of Planning (3) (WI) (F)
Past and present planning concepts, methods, and theories. In-depth examination of evolution of cities and history of planning in US.
3030. Urban and Regional Planning (3)
Philosophy, theories and principles involved in urban and regional planning, including an analysis of problems confronting urban areas, and the development of regions and their resources.
3031. Quantitative Analysis in Planning (3) (S)
P: PLAN 3021 or consent of the instructor. Basic application in demographic, economic, land use, and transportation methods in policy context to develop effective community planning.
3032. Planning Legislation and Administration (3) (WI) (S)
State enabling acts, zoning ordinances, subdivision regulations, and other legislative bases essential to effective planning. Administrative methods and theory presented in context of planning practice.
3041. Computer Applications in Planning (3) (F)
2 lecture and 2 lab hours per week. Various computer hardware, software, and operating systems for effective planning and design at urban and regional scales.
3051. Introduction to GIS in Planning (3) (F)
2 hours lecture and 2 hours lab per week. Overview of principles and applications of GIS in planning. Focuses on use of GIS to facilitate decision making in planning process.
4003. Urban Form and Design (3) (S)
General types, scales, features, and determinants of urban form. Design concepts, problems, and potentials associated with urban development projects of varying scales.
4015. Emergency Management Planning (3) (F,SS)
Case studies examine emergency management planning and techniques. Emphasis on mitigation of, preparation for, response to, and recovery from natural and technological disasters.
4021. Advanced GIS Applications in Planning (3) (S)
2 lecture and 2 lab hours per week. P: PLAN 3051 or GEOG 2410 or consent of instructor. Overview of advanced principles and applications of GIS in planning using vector, raster, and TIN data models. Focuses on use of GIS to facilitate and support decision-making in planning process.
4025. Housing and Neighborhood Planning (3) (F)
Substantive and methodological issues related to housing and neighborhood planning. Current local, state, and federal statutory planning requirements in housing and community development examined in relationship to planning process.
4041. GPS Applications in Planning (3) (S,SS)
2 lecture and 1 lab hours per week. P: PLAN 3051 or consent of instructor. Provides an in-depth survey of Global Positioning Systems (GPS) technology developments, applications, concepts, and operation. Emphasis is on field data collection, processing, and integration with GIS to provide accurate mapping for many essential decision-making and planning applications.
4046. Planning and Design Studio (3) (F,S)
2 lecture and 2 lab hours per week. Analytical and practical skills involved in real world planning, development, and management.
4050. World Architecture and Urbanism (3) (S)
Survey of world architectural styles and urban patterns from antiquity to present time.
4096. Planning Studio (3) (F,S)
4 studio hours per week. P: PLAN 3022; PLAN 3051; or consent of instructor. Collaborative studio investigating an advanced issue in planning. Work is conducted in teams, often for a community client.
4099. Practicum in Planning (3) (WI) (F,S)
1 lecture and 2 lab hours per week. Culmination of undergraduate preparation for professional practice. Planning process used to prepare high-quality planning document.
5025. Coastal Area Planning and Management (3) (S)
2 classroom and 3 studio hours per week. P: Consent of instructor. Conceptual approach to planning and management problems, policies, and practices in coastal area.
5045. Environmental Resources Planning and Management (3)
Frame of reference for studying natural resources for purpose of development.
5065. Land Use Planning (3) (S)
2 lecture and 2 lab hours per week. Social, economic, physical, and environmental aspects of urban land use and planning. Other tools for effective planning.
5121, 5131. Problems in Planning (2,3) (5131:WI)
3 hours per week per credit hour. P: Consent of instructor. Analysis of specific problem in planning to be approved prior to registration.
5985. Historic Preservation Planning (3) Same as HIST 5985
Historic preservation planning. Examines theoretical, legal, historical, and design bases of preservation planning.
PLAN Banked Courses
3000. Urban Planning (3)
3010. Regional Planning (3)
4001. Field Methods in Planning (3)
4005. Environmental Impact Assessment in Planning (3)
4040. Community Facilities Planning and Capital Budgeting (3)
4086. Site Design (3)
4132. Land Use Law (3)
4152. Environmental Law (3)
5015, 5016. Transportation Planning in Transportation Planning Studio (2,1)
5035. Community Planning for Health Facilities (3)
5055. Soils and Planning (3)
5095. International Development Planning (3)
5111. Problems in Planning (1)

POLS: Political Science

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1010. National Government (3) (F,S,SS) (FC:SO)
Basic concepts, structure, powers, procedures, and problems of American government.
2000. Computer Applications for Political Science (3) (F,S)
2 lecture and 2 lab hours per week. P: POLS majors and PADM minors; or consent. Basic computing skills and microcomputer and mainframe applications appropriate for political and governmental data. (Basic typing skills assumed.)
2010. Introduction to Comparative Government and Politics (3) (WI) (F,S) (FC:SO)
May receive credit for one of POLS 2010, 2107. Comparative analysis of political systems. Examines foundations of structures and governments.
2020. Introduction to International Relations (3) (F,S) (FC:SO)
May receive credit for one of POLS 2020, 2106. Basic concepts and principles of functioning of international system. War and peace, economics, diplomacy, arms control, and threats to peace.
2070. Introduction to Political Theory (3) (F,S) (FC:SO)
May receive credit for one of POLS 2070, 2108. Selected literature and thinkers addressing political life and problems.
3011. Political Issues (3) (FC:SO)
Current foreign and domestic issues facing American national government.
3012. Politics Through Film (3) (S) (FC:SO)
Themes, issues, and processes of politics through in-depth study of selected films.
3013. Decision Making In the United Nations (3) (F) (FC:SO)
Development of debate and decision-making skills regarding issues before the United Nations, and practiced through administering a model United Nations conference.
3031. Introduction to Behavioral Methodology (3) (F,S) (FC:SO)
Application of scientific method in political science using techniques common in discipline for describing and analyzing data.
3033. Voting Behavior and Public Opinion (3) (FC:SO)
Factors which affect development and expression of public opinion, voter turnout, partisanship, and electoral choices.
3035. American Political Parties and Politics (3) (FC:SO)
Politics, parties, and pressure groups. Consideration of recent research findings in many aspects of political behavior.
3037. Campaigns and Elections (3)
Detailed analysis of campaigns and elections in the US, from prior to primaries to general election, including candidates, parties, media, and voting behavior.
3039. Black Politics in America (3) (FC:SO)
Investigates political goals of Black Americans.
3040. Women in Politics (3)
P: POLS 1010 or consent of instructor. Status and influence of women in American political system. Cross-national comparisons.
3041. Women and Public Policy (S) (3) (FC:SO)
P: POLS 1010 or consent of instructor. Public policies that affect women in American society.
3042. American Politics Through Music (3) (S) (FC:SO)
3 lecture hours per week plus 3 lab hours per semester. Study of political expression through and qualitative research about various genres of music.
3050. Theory and Politics of Social and Protest Movements in the United States (S) (3) (FC:SO)
Major social and protest movements, including women’s suffrage, civil rights, and the rise of the religious right.
3090. Religion and American Politics (3) (S)
The role of religious groups in the American political system, including both elite and mass behavior, and denominational differences.
3144. American Foreign Policy (S) (3)
RP: POLS 2020. Principles and policies which characterize America’s recent and contemporary foreign relations.
3155. National Security Policy (3)
Overview of processes, forces, and influences which determine contemporary national security policy in United States. Examine contemporary issues, including transnational threats, multinational and coalition defense strategies, force modernization, recruitment and retention, and homeland security.
3202. The American Legislature (3) (FC:SO)
Organization, powers, and role of legislature in American political process.
3203. The American Executive (3) (FC:SO)
Organization, powers, and role of executive in American political process.
3204. The American Judiciary (3) (F) (FC:SO)
Organization, powers, and role of judiciary in American political process.
3223. Constitutional Powers (3) (FC:SO)
Constitutional issues related to powers of Congress, the presidency, courts, and state governments in American political system.
3224. Civil Liberties (3) (FC:SO)
Contemporary civil liberties issues confronting American political system.
3232. The European Union (3) (S) (FC:SO)
P: POLS 2010 or 2020 or consent of instructor. Major theoretical issues and political problems surrounding evolution of major institutions of European Union.
3234. West European Political Systems (3) (F) (FC:SO)
Comparative analysis of political structures and institutions in Great Britain, France, Germany, and selected West European nations.
3235. East European Political Systems (3) (FC:SO)
Political structures, institutions, and processes of eastern European states. Communist legacy, socioeconomic transformations, and patterns of institutional change.
3236. Russian Politics (3) (FC:SO)
Political structures, institutions, and processes in post-Soviet Russia. Legacies of communism and current political, economic, and social transformations.
3240. State and Local Government (3) (F,S) (FC:SO)
May receive credit for one of POLS 2102, 3240. P: POLS 1010 or consent of instructor. Structures, principles, and policies of subnational government in US.
3241. Urban Political Systems (3)
Issues confronting US urban areas.
3242. Municipal Policy and Administration (3)
Decision-making process in urban governments. Survey of selected policy areas.
3243. Comparative State Politics (3)
Major state political institutions, political context within which they function, and processes by which they work. Comparative analysis rather than detailed account of a particular state government.
3244. North Carolina Politics (3) (FC:SO)
Forces that shaped NC politics and public policy. Survey of NC government.
3252. Public Administration (3) (F,S) (FC:SO)
Federal government administration and role of administrative agencies in formulation and implementation of public policy.
3253. Government Fiscal Administration (3)
RP: POLS 1010. Government budgeting, fiscal policy, principles, and problems of taxation.
3254. Governmental Personnel Administration (3)
RP: POLS 3252 or consent of instructor. Public personnel administration. Emphasis on modern personnel procedures in federal, state, and local jurisdictions.
3255. Domestic Public Policy (3) (F,S)
American policy-making process and major issues in several public policy areas.
3256. Environmental Politics (3)
Energy and environmental policies, especially governmental responses to conflicting goals of clean environment and energy sufficiency.
3257. International Environmental Policy (3)
Structures and processes used in formulation and implementation of international environmental treaties and agreements. Focus on international environmental policy, law, and cooperation.
3260. Middle Eastern Political Systems (3) (FC:SO)
Comparative study of government and politics in selected countries of Middle East.
3265. African Political Systems (3) (FC:SO)
Comparative study of government and politics in selected countries in Africa.
3270. Latin-American Political Systems (3) (FC:SO)
Selected Latin-American governments. Emphasis on internal processes and systems.
3280. South Asian Political Systems (3)
Comparative analysis of development and change in India, Pakistan, Ceylon, and Burma.
3282. East Asian Political Systems (3) (FC:SO)
Comparative analysis of political structures and institutions in East Asia with particular attention to China, Japan, and other selected countries.
3290. Conflict and Peace in the Post-Cold War Era (3)
Political, economic, socio-cultural, and ecological issues in post-Cold War international system that structure nature of conflict and prospects for future cooperation and peace.
3293. International Organizations (3)
Origins, structures, and functions of United Nations, Organization of American States, North Atlantic Treaty Organization, and other international organizations.
3295. International Law (3)
P: POLS 2020 or consent of instructor. Basic survey of international law.
3297. International Political Economy (3) (FC:SO)
P: POLS 2020 or consent of instructor. Major theoretical issues and political problems surrounding interaction of international politics and international economics.
3370. American Political Thought (3) (S) (FC:SO)
American political thought from Puritans to present.
4000. Political Leadership (3)
P: 12 s.h. in POLS or consent of instructor. Theoretical analysis of leadership as defined, developed, and practiced in diverse political settings.
4107. Topics in Comparative Politics (3)
May be repeated for maximum of 6 s.h. with change of topic. P: 12 s.h. in comparative government and politics courses or consent of instructor. Selected topics and issues include executive-legislative relations, ethnicity and nationalism, revolutions, etc.
4310. Public Policy and the Media (3) (F) (FC:SO)
Role of media in formulation and analysis of public policies primarily in US, also comparisons with other nations.
4321. Contemporary Southern Politics (3)
Comprehensive study of southern regional politics. Emphasis on role of mass movements, power structures, political parties, and factionalism. Underlying cultural and economic factors.
4360. Politics of Developing Areas (3) (FC:SO)
Major theoretical issues and political problems central to processes of modernization and socioeconomic development in Third World.
4371. Western Political Thought I: Moses to Montesquieu (3)
RP: POLS 2070. Major political thinkers from ancient Hebrews to Enlightenment.
4373. Western Political Thought II: Rousseau to Camus (3)
RP: POLS 2070. Major political thinkers from romantic period to Existentialism and “New Left.”
4380. Topics in International Politics (3)
May be repeated for maximum of 6 s.h. with change of topic. P: POLS 2020 or consent of instructor. Selected topics and issues in contemporary international politics.
4382. Politics of Terrorism (3)
Explores phenomenon of terrorism throughout world with particular focus on characteristics of terrorism, reasons why groups choose terrorist action, and issues in counter terrorism.
4383. War in the Modern Age (3)
Broad-ranging study of politics of modern war. Causes, weaponry and strategy, and effects. Arms control issues and analysis of potential for armed conflict in post-Cold War era.
POLS 4384. Inter-American Relations (3) (SOY) (FC:SO).
International politics among the countries of the Western Hemisphere.
4501, 4502. Independent Study in Political Science (1,2) (WI, WI) (F,S,SS)
May count maximum of 6 s.h. of POLS 4501, 4502, 4521, 4522, 4981, 4982, 4992 toward any degree offered by the political science dept. P: Consent of dept chair. Individualized program developed through student initiative in consultation with professor of choice as an extension of material offered through formal courses in departmental curriculum. Available only as extended study program when regular course offerings in a particular field of discipline have been exhausted and student is interested in additional study in that field.
4521, 4522. Directed Readings in Political Science (1,2) (F,S,SS)
May count maximum of 6 s.h. of POLS 4501, 4502, 4521, 4522, 4981, 4982, 4992 toward any degree offered by the political science dept. P: Consent of dept chair. Advanced students read basic literature in field.
4551, 4552. Honors (3,3) (WI, WI) (F,S,SS)
P for 4551: POLS major; invitation to participate in honors program; P for 4552: POLS 4551 with a minimum grade of B.
4981, 4982. Internship in Practical Politics (1,2) (F,S,SS)
3 hours per week for 4981; 6 hours per week for 4982. May be taken concurrently. May count maximum of 6 s.h. of POLS 4501, 4502, 4521, 4522, 4981, 4982, 4992 toward any degree offered by the political science dept. P: Consent of internship director and dept chair. Experiential learning under academic supervision in political setting.
4991, 4992. Internship in Public Administration (1,2) (F,S,SS)
3 hours per week for 4991; 6 hours per week for 4992. May be taken concurrently. May count maximum of 6 s.h. of POLS 4501, 4502, 4521, 4522, 4981, 4982, 4991, 4992 toward any degree offered by the political science department. P: Consent of internship director and dept. chair. Experiential learning under academic supervision in public agency setting.
4996. Capitol Experience (9) (F,S,SS)
P: Admission to approved legislative internship program and consent of dept chair. Participation in organized legislative internship program with state legislature or U.S. national government. Experiential learning under academic supervision in political or public agency setting.
5000. American Government and Politics (3)
May not count toward POLS major or minor or MPA degree. P: Consent of instructor. Introductory survey of readings in American national government and politics for students interested in graduate work, but who have no undergraduate background in political science or public administration.
POLS Banked Courses
3145. Russian Foreign Policy (3)
4305. Public Administrative Theory (3)
4306. Intergovernmental Relations in the United States (3)
4307. Comparative Public Administration (3)
4384. Inter-American Politics (3)
5030. Seminar in American Government (3)
5050. Seminar in Political Participation and Behavior (3)
5381. Seminar in Comparative Politics (3)
5410. Seminar in International Relations (3)

PSYC: Psychology

Top
1000. Introductory Psychology (3) (F,S,SS) (FC:SO)
May receive credit for one of PSYC 1000, 1060. General survey of fundamental principles underlying human behavior. Introduction, learning, memory, development, physiological, motivation, social and abnormal behavior, and one or two additional topics as time permits.
1060. Honors Introduction to Psychology (3) (F,S) (FC:SO)
May receive credit for one of PSYC 1000, 1060. Introduces fundamental concepts in psychology in seminar format.
2101. Psychological Statistics (4) (F,S,SS) (FC:SO)
3 lecture and 2 lab hours per week. P: MATH 1065 or equivalent or MATH 1066; PSYC 1000 or 1060. Descriptive statistics. Measures of central tendency, variability, and correlation. Probability, with emphasis on sampling distributions used for prediction and hypothesis testing. Selection, computation, and interpretation of parametric and nonparametric inferential statistics, including introduction to analysis of variance.
2201. Psychology of Childhood (3) (F,S,SS) (FC:SO)
May not count toward PSYC major or minor. P: PSYC 1000 or 1060. Psychological bases of growth and development of children. Brief introduction of major theories and scientific findings and their application to learning, cognitive development, motivation, personality, and social relations (including parent-child, peers, and school relations).
2210. Research Methods in Psychology (4) (WI) (F,S) (FC:SO)
P: PSYC 2101 or equivalent. Methods of research, including design, measurement, analysis, interpretation, and presentation.
2250. Selected Topics in Psychology (3) (FC:SO)
P: PSYC 1000 or 1060. Important current developments. Topics vary according to faculty preferences.
2275. Psychology of Adjustment (3) (F,S,SS) (FC:SO)
P: PSYC 1000 or 1060. Overall dynamic adjustive process in individuals in situations of stress, frustration, conflict, disease, disability, and other psychologically thwarting situations.
3206. Developmental Psychology (3) (WI*) (F,S,SS) (FC:SO)
P: PSYC 1000 or 1060. Psychological development throughout life span. Emphasis on perceptual, cognitive, social, and personality development.
3221. Social Psychology (3) (F,S,SS) (FC:SO)
P: PSYC 1000 or 1060. Interaction of individual and society. Topics include study of basic psychological factors such as perception and motivation, which shape and reflect social influence; nature, formation, and change of attitudes; attitude measurement; conformity; role expectations; leadership and dynamics.
3225. Psychology of Learning (3) (F,S,SS) (FC:SO)
P: PSYC 1000 or 1060. Introductory survey of experimental methods, basic research, principles, and theories of learning and forgetting.
3226. Cognitive Psychology (3) (F,S,SS) (FC:SO)
Focus on human research and cognition including attention, perception, consciousness, memory, concept learning, language, symbolic behavior, and problem solving.
3241. Personnel and Industrial Psychology (3) (F,S,SS) (FC:SO)
May receive credit for one of MGMT 4242, PSYC 3241. P: PSYC 1000 or 1060. Systems approach to study employee-employer relationships influencing productivity and satisfaction. Secondary emphasis on employee selection, job analysis, performance appraisal, and training. Research applied to industrial, governmental, and military organizations.
3290. Comparative and Evolutionary Psychology (3) (FC:SO)
P: PSYC 1000 or 1060. Examines similarities and differences among species (including humans) by relating behaviors to reproductive success and adaptation to disparate environments.
3300. Psychology of Personality (3) (F,S) (FC:SO)
P: PSYC 1000 or 1060. Theories of personality. Emphasis on structure, development, and dynamics.
3310. Introduction to Neuroscience (3) (F,S,SS) (FC:SO) Same as NEUR 3310
P: PSYC 1000 or 1060. Neuroanatomy and neurophysiology and their relationship to behavior.
3311. Neuropsychology (3) (F,S) (FC:SO)
P: PSYC 1000 or 1060. Clinical and cognitive neuropsychology. Basic anatomy of nervous system and neuronal physiology, cortical lesion syndromes, brain disorders affecting higher functions, and basic research on attention, laterality, language, and thought.
3312. Sensation and Perception (3) (F,S)
P: PSYC 1000 or 1060. Anatomy and functioning of the various sensory/perceptual systems, including empirical research, controversies, and theories of perception.
3314. Psychology of Religion (3) (FC:SO)
P: PSYC 1000 or 1060. Effects of religious doctrine upon individual’s behavior, beliefs, values, attitudes, anxieties, and feelings of guilt.
3777. Ethnocultural Influences on the Development of the Self (3)
P: PSYC 1000 or 1060. Importance of various ethnocultural factors (gender, race, age, nationality, education, occupation, religion, geographical location, family background) which impact psychological development of self.
4000. Advanced General Psychology (3) (WI) (F,S,SS)
P: PSYC major; PSYC 2210; 2 courses from learning and cognition, biological bases, or general course groups. In-depth overview of psychology as a science organized around five main questions: How do humans (and, where relevant, animals) act, how do they know, how do they interact, how do they develop, and how do they differ from each other?
4250. Advanced Topics Seminar (3) (WI) (F, S, SS)
May be repeated with change of topic for a maximum of 6 s.h. P: PSYC 2210 and consent of instructor. In-depth coverage of primary research sources in a psychological topic.
4280. History of Psychology (3) (WI)
P: PSYC major; PSYC 2210; 2 courses from learning and cognition, biological bases, or general course groups. Psychological thought from ancient Greek philosophers to present.
4305. Educational Psychology (3) (F,S,SS)
P: PSYC 2201 or 3206 or 3240 or equivalent. Psychological principles applied to educational settings, including learning, motivation, classroom management, and psychological assessment.
4312. Laboratory Methods in Behavioral Neuroscience (3) Formerly PSYC 5312, 5313
1 lecture and 4 lab hours per week. P: PSYC 3310, 3311; or consent of instructor. Basic techniques of animal surgery, histological, examination, drug administration, and behavior testing.
4315. Neuroscience: Literature and Laboratory Experience (3) (F,S) Formerly PSYC 5315, 5316
1-hour seminar and 8 hours lab per week. May be repeated for maximum of 12 s.h. May count a maximum of 12 s.h. toward PSYC major. P: PSYC 2210; 3310 or 3311; consent of instructor. Recently published research in behavioral neuroscience and lab work on ongoing research project.
4333. Learning Theories and Applications (3)
PSYC 1000. Introductory survey of the basic theories and principles of learning, including classical and operant conditioning, and successful applications of these principles in a variety of settings.
4335. Psychology of Women (3) (FC:SO)
P: PSYC 1000 or 1060. Psychological issues pertaining to women. Impact of sex and gender on cognitive and personality development, mental health, methodological issues in research, roles of women in psychology, and influence of feminist theories.
4340. Behavioral Pharmacology Seminar (3) Formerly PSYC 5320
P: PSYC 3310, 3311; or consent of instructor. Behavioral and neurophysiological effects of psychoactive drugs in experimental animals and clinical populations.
4350. Psychology of Sexual Behavior (3)
P: 6 s.h. of PSYC to include PSYC 1000 or 1060. Research relating to psychological aspects of sexual behavior. Historical and cultural perspectives and conventional and unconventional sexual expression.
4372. Psychology of Thinking (3)
P: PSYC 3225, 3226; or equivalent; or consent of instructor. Theory and research on complex human behavior. Focus on problem solving, conceptual behavior, memory, psycholinguistics, and creativity.
4375. Abnormal Psychology (3) (F,S,SS) (FC:SO)
P: PSYC 1000 or 1060. Systematic appraisal of development of human deviant behavior. Examination of formation of deviancy and current diagnostic procedures.
4401. Thesis Research (3)
P: PSYC major; PSYC 2210; GPA above 3.00 overall and in Psychology. Research under direction of full-time faculty member leading to preparation of written senior thesis proposal.
4402. Senior Thesis/Project (3) (WI)
9 lab hours per week. P: PSYC major; PSYC 4401; 2 courses from the learning and cognition, biological bases, or general course groups; GPA above 3.00 overall and in Psychology. Design, conduct, analyze, interpret, and write up an experiment. Conducted in lab or field setting.
4501, 4502. Psychological Research I, II (2,2) (F,S,SS)
P: PSYC 1000 or 1060; consent of instructor and dept chair. Supervised research involving planning, conducting, and writing of behavioral study.
4521, 4522, 4523. Readings in Psychology (1,1,1) (F,S,SS)
Application form obtained from Department of Psychology. No class meetings; performance mode and reporting to be arranged with the instructor. P: PSYC major; PSYC 1000 or 1060. Survey, review, and/or critical analysis of reading material appropriate to students’ interests and needs.
4601. Honors Research (3)
To be taken in second semester of junior year. P: PSYC 2210; admission to PSYC Honors Program; GPA above 3.5 overall and in psychology. Research with full-time faculty member leading to preparation of written senior thesis proposal.
4602. Senior Honors Thesis (3) (WI)
Satisfies departmental requirements for capstone course. Minimum of 9 hours per week. P: PSYC 4601 with minimum grade of B; GPA above 3.5 overall and in psychology. Research with full-time faculty member resulting in senior thesis.
4990, 4991, 4992. Field Experience in Psychology (1,1,1) (F,S)
May be taken concurrently. Approximately 10 hours per week for 1 s.h. credit. May count maximum of 3 s.h. field experience toward PSYC major. Additional hours may count as general electives. P: PSYC major; minimum cumulative and major 2.0 GPA; 9 s.h. in PSYC; consent of dept chair. Application of concepts and principles from related courses to applied situations in field. Lab and/or field experiences under joint supervision of field supervisor and university instructor.
5250. Topics in Psychology (3) (WI*)
May be repeated with change of topic for a maximum of 6 s.h. P: Minimum of 9 s.h. in PSYC. Selected topics at advanced level. Topics vary.
5325. Introduction to Psychological Testing (3)
P: PSYC 1000 or 1060; a statistics course. Principles of testing, including requirements for validity, reliability, norm samples, and examples of psychological tests.
5380. Psychology of the Exceptional Child (3)
P: PSYC 1000 or 1060. Study of children who are markedly different from the average child in physical, mental, emotional, academic, or social characteristics.
5400. Advanced Gerontology (3)
P: PSYC 1000 or 1060; GERO 2400 or consent of instructor. Seminar on psychological research and its applications to the aged.
5990, 5991, 5992. Field Experience in Psychology (1,1,1)
May be taken concurrently. Accepted graduate psychology students spend approximately 10 hours per week per credit hour in lab/field experiences under joint supervision of field supervisor and university instructor. May count maximum of 3 s.h. of field experience toward BA or MA PSYC requirement. Additional hours may count toward electives. P for undergraduate students: PSYC major; 9 s.h. in PSYC; minimum cumulative and PSYC major 2.0 GPA; dept consent. P for graduate students: PSYC major; minimum cumulative and major GPA of 3.0 in PSYC; dept consent. Application of concepts and principles from related courses to applied situations in the field.
PSYC Banked Courses
2010. Memory and Thinking (3)
2150. Applied Psychology (2)
3240. Psychology of Adolescence
4320, 4321. Behavioral Research (3,0)
5311. Sensation and Perception
5370. Mental Hygiene in Schools (2)