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Undergraduate Catalog 2007-08


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Undergraduate Courses


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MATE: Mathematics Education

1267. Functional Relationships (3) (S)
P: MATH 1065 or equivalent. Problem-solving approach to study of functions for teachers. Includes polynomial, exponential, logarithmic, logistic, and trigonometric functions from multiple representations, particularly using visual technology and making real-world applications. Applications taken from K-12 mathematics.
2067. Data and Probability Explorations (3) (F,S)
P: MATH 1065 or equivalent. Conceptual development and exploration of notions in data analysis and probability for teachers. Collection, organization, representation, and analysis of data from experiments and surveys. Probabilistic analysis for purposes of judging claim and making decisions. Applications taken from K-12 mathematics.
2123. Early Experiences for the Prospective Teacher (1) (F,S) Formerly MATH 2123
For prospective teachers. Minimum of 16 hours of directed observations and planned participation in appropriate school environments and 8 hours of seminar class instruction in the teaching area. May not count toward BA in MATH major or minor. P: MATH 2171. Introduction to teaching of mathematics.
2129. Basic Concepts of Mathematics II (2) (F,S,SS) Formerly MATH 2129
For elementary education majors. May not count toward MATH or CSCI major or minor. P: MATH 2127. Second course in sequence. Methods and language of geometry and relationship of geometry to real world.
2700. Applications in Statistics and Probability (3) (S)
P: MATH 1065 or equivalent. Conceptual development, exploration, and applications in statistics and probability for teachers. Study involves the collection, organization, representation, and interpretation of data using a hands-on approach. Emphasis on using technology, including graphics calculators and software. Applications taken from 9-12 mathematics.
2800. Discrete Mathematics: Explorations and Applications (3) (F)
P: MATH 1065 or equivalent. Problem solving study of discrete mathematics for teachers. Topics include sequences, graph theory, counting techniques, dynamical systems, recursion, combinatorics, and mathematical induction. Applications taken from 9-12 mathematics.
3050. Mathematics and Methods for Grades Pre-K-2 (3) (F, S, SS)
P: Foundations curriculum mathematics course; C: MATE 3051. Mathematics of the Pre-K-2 classroom including number sense, operations, place value, patterns, shapes, and tools for measurement. Focus on student thinking and tools and strategies for developing thinking. Includes attention to exceptional children in the general mathematics curriculum.
3051. Field Experience in Mathematics Grades K-2 (1) (F, S, SS)
P: Foundations curriculum mathematics course; C: MATE 3050. Supervised practicum in a K-2 mathematics setting. Focus on diagnosis of student thinking.
3060. Mathematics and Methods for Grades 3-6 (4) (F, S, SS)
P: Admission to upper division; MATE 3050. Fractions, decimals and percent, properties of polygons, area and perimeter and other grade 3-6 mathematical concepts. Methods of instruction, lesson planning, tools for instruction, and strategies. Emphasis on reasoning, problem solving, communication, and connections. Includes attention to exceptional children in the general mathematics curriculum.
3067. Algebra and Number Foundations (3) (F,S)
P: MATH 1065 or equivalent. Problem-solving development of important concepts in number and algebra for teachers. Focus on properties of integers, rationals, and real numbers; properties of linear, quadratic, and cubic functions; multiple representations (physical models, graphs, equations, tables) of relations, functions, equations, and inequalities. Applications taken from K-12 mathematics.
3167. Geometry and Measurement (3) (F,S)
P: MATH 1065 or equivalent. Tool-based development of important concepts in Euclidean geometry and measurement for teachers. Focus on inductive reasoning, deductive reasoning, and informal and formal proof. Use of tools (technology and instruments) to explore issues in measurement. Applications taken from K-12 mathematics.
3218. Teaching Mathematics in Special Education (3) (F,S,SS) Formerly MATH 3218
4 lecture/lab hours per week. Lab and practicum experiences required. May not count toward MATH major or minor. P: Admission to upper division; MATH 1065, 2127; SPED 2000; at least one of the following: SPED 2102, 2103, 2104; RP: MATE 2129. Methods, materials, and techniques of teaching mathematics to special education students.
3223. Teaching Mathematics in the Elementary Grades K-6 (3) (F,S,SS) Formerly MATH 3223
2 lecture and 2 lab hours per week. P: Admission to upper division; MATE 2129. Techniques and methods for teaching mathematics to students in grades K-6. Lab provides deeper understanding of mathematical concepts and experience with materials and methods appropriate for classroom work.
3267. Concepts in Discrete Mathematics (3) (S)
P: MATE 3067. Problem-solving course for teachers features graph theory, social choice, dynamical systems, logic, sets, and mathematical induction. Applications taken from K-12 mathematics.
3300. Geometry for High School Teachers (3) (F)
P: MATH 2171. Euclidean geometry from a synthetic, analytic and measurement perspective and an introduction to Non-Euclidean geometry for secondary teachers developed through inductive and deductive reasoning, informal and formal proof, and technology. Applications taken from grades 9-12 and college mathematics.
3367. Mathematical Modeling (3) (S)
P: MATE 1267, 2267, 3067, and 3167. Capstone course in modeling for teachers. Investigation of models such as Mendelian Genetics, Markov Chains, Weighted Voting, and population models. Development of models to solve real-world problems using a variety of mathematical strands. Applications taken from K-12 mathematics.
3523. Teaching Topics in High School Mathematics (3) (S)
P: MATE 2123. Pedagogical focus on lesson planning for major content areas in the high school mathematics curriculum, particularly algebra, geometry, and advanced mathematics topics. Fifteen hours of field experience.
4001. Technology in Secondary Mathematics Education (3) (F) Formerly MATH 4001
2 lecture and 2 lab hours per week. May not count toward MATH major or minor. P: Admission to upper division; MATE 2700, 2800; C: MATE 4323. Uses and implications of calculators and computers in secondary mathematics curriculum.
4319. Teaching Mathematics in the Middle Grades (3) (F) Formerly MATH 4319
4 hours per week and 10-12 hours of field experience. May not count toward MATH or CSCI major or minor. P: Admission to upper division; EDUC 3200; MIDG 3010, 3022; MATE 3067, 3167, 3267 or consent of instructor; C: MIDG 4001, 4010; ENED or HIED or MIDG or SCIE 4319; or consent of instructor. Techniques and methods of teaching mathematics in grades 6-9.
4323. The Teaching of Mathematics in High School (3) (F) Formerly MATH 4323
4 hours per week. May not count toward BA in MATH or minor. P: Admission to upper division; MATE 2123. Modern methods and techniques used in teaching secondary school mathematics.
4324. Internship in Mathematics (10) (S) Formerly MATH 4324
Full-time, semester-long internship. May not count toward BA in MATH or minor. P: Admission to upper division; MATE 4323; C: MATE 4325; READ 3990. Observation and supervised teaching in mathematics in assigned public secondary school classroom.
4325. Internship Seminar: Issues in Mathematics Education (1) (S) Formerly MATH 4325
May not count toward BA in MATH or minor. P: Admission to upper division; MATE 4323; C: MATE 4324. Individualized study of problems or issues.
4501, 4502, 4503. Independent Study in Mathematics Education (1,2,3)
For advanced mathematics education students. Number of hours per week will depend on credit hours and nature of work assigned. P: BS in MATH, secondary major; mathematics concentration; consent of dept chair. Topics supplement regular curriculum.
5251. Modern Mathematics for Elementary Teachers I (3) Formerly MATH 5251
Not open to undergraduate or graduate math majors or minors. A teacher taking this course would receive certificate renewal credit and/or 3 s.h. of graduate elective credit in elementary education. P for undergraduate students: MATE 3223 or consent of instructor; P for graduate students: MATE 2129; MATH 2127; 3219 or 3221; or equivalent; or consent of instructor. Numeration systems and real numbers from axiomatic approach. Topics in geometry, algebra, probability theory, and number theory. Emphasis on relationship between these topics and school mathematics.
5263, 5264. Modern Mathematics for Junior High School Teachers I, II (3,3) Formerly MATH 5263, 5264
May not count toward MATH or CSCI major or minor. P for 5263: Consent of instructor; P for 5264: MATH 5263 or consent of instructor. Set theory, mathematical systems and proofs, number systems, elementary number theory, applications of mathematics in business, science, and other areas. Basic concepts of geometry, algebra, probability, and statistics.
5265, 5266. Microcomputers in Secondary Education (3,0) Formerly MATH 5265, 5266
2 lecture and 2 lab hours per week. May not count toward a MATH or CSCI major or minor. P: MATE 3166 or MATH 3166 or MATH 1075 or 1085; consent of instructor. Operation and programming of microcomputers in secondary school system.
5267, 5268. LOGO: A Computer Language for Educators (3,0) Formerly MATH 5267, 5268
2 lecture and 2 lab hours per week. May not count toward MATH major or minor. P: MATE or MATH 3166 or consent of instructor. LOGO and its uses with students K-12.

MATH: Mathematics

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0001. Intermediate Algebra-A (2) (F,S,SS)
May not be taken by students who have credit for MATH 0045, 1065, 1074, 1085, 2119, 2171, or who have passed the math placement test. May not count toward foundations curriculum math requirement, certification, or degree. Remedial course in basic algebra; some sections may be taught in a lab/tutorial mode.
0045. Intermediate Algebra-B (2)
May not be taken by students who have credit for MATH 0001, 1065, 1074, 1085, 2119, 2171, or who have passed the math placement test. May not count toward foundations curriculum math requirement, certification, or degree. Remedial basic algebra. Some sections may be taught in lab/tutorial mode.
1050. Explorations in Mathematics (3) (F,S,SS) (FC:MA)
May not count toward MATH major or minor. Fulfills foundations curriculum MATH requirement for students whose major does not require a specific MATH course. Broad overview of mathematics and its relevance to life. Selected topics include at least four of the following: algebraic concepts, geometry, set theory and logic, number theory, discrete mathematics, statistics, consumer mathematics/finance, and history of mathematics.
1065. College Algebra (3) (F,S,SS) (FC:MA)
May not be taken by students who have credit for MATH 1085. P: Appropriate score on math placement test. Topics include sets; linear, quadratic, polynomial, and exponential functions; inequalities; permutations; combinations; binomial theorem; and mathematical induction.
1066. Applied Mathematics for Decision Making (3) (F,S,SS) (FC:MA)
Required for students planning to major in business administration or accounting. P: Appropriate score on the math placement test or approval of the dept chair. Skills in formulating models for and interpreting solutions to business word problems. Topics include linear and nonlinear equations, systems of linear equations, applications of matrix algebra, and applied basic differential calculus. No proofs included.
1067. Algebraic Concepts and Relationships (3) (F,S) (FC:MA)
May not count toward MATH or CSCI major or minor. P: Appropriate score on math placement test. Properties of integers, rationals, real and complex numbers, and polynomials from an algebraic point of view; conjectures and intuitive proofs in number theory; properties of linear and quadratic functions. Representations of real-world relationships with physical models, charts, graphs, equations and inequalities. Emphasis on development of problem-solving strategies and abilities.
1074. Applied Trigonometry (2) (F,S,SS)
Students who plan to take MATH 2171 must choose 1083 or 1085. May not be taken by students who have credit for MATH 1083 or 1085. P: MATH 1065. Practical and computational aspects of trigonometry. Properties of trigonometric functions. Use of tables, interpolation, logarithms, solution of right and oblique triangles, and applications.
1077. Pre-Calculus Concepts and Relationships (3) (S)
May not count toward MATH or CSCI major or minor. P: MATH 1067. Modeling approach to study of functions (including logarithmic, exponential, and trigonometric functions), data analysis, and matrices. Foundation for future course work in calculus, finite mathematics, discrete mathematics, and statistics.
1083. Introduction to Functions (3) (F,S,SS) (FC:MA)
May not be taken by students who have successfully completed MATH 1074 or MATH 1085. P: MATH 1065 with a minimum grade of C. Accelerated introduction to language of functions. Emphasis on trigonometry as a preparation for calculus sequence MATH 2171-73.
1085. Pre-Calculus Mathematics (5) (F,S,SS) (FC:MA)
May not be taken by students who have credit for MATH 1074. P: MATH 1065 with minimum grade of C. Algebra and trigonometry for qualified students who plan to take calculus.
2119. Elements of Calculus (3) (F,S,SS) (FC:MA)
May not receive credit for MATH 2119 after having received credit for a higher numbered calculus course. P: MATH 1065 with minimum grade of C. Elementary differentiation and integration techniques. Proofs not emphasized.
2121. Calculus for the Life Sciences I (3) (F,S,SS) (FC:MA)
May not receive credit for MATH 2121 after taking MATH 2171 P: MATH 1065 or 1077 with minimum grade of C. Introductory differential calculus with biological sciences applications. Introduces differentiation of exponential and logarithmic functions. Applications to exponential biological phenomena, related rates, regions of increase and decrease, and extrema.
2122. Calculus for the Life Sciences II (3) (F,S,SS)
May not receive credit for MATH 2122 after taking MATH 2172. P: MATH 2121. Introductory integral calculus with biological sciences applications. Introduction to and applications of definite integrals. Introduces trigonometric functions with applications to periodic biological phenomena. Functions of several variables, partial derivatives, simple differential equations, and arithmetic of matrices and vectors.
2124. Elementary Mathematical Models (1)
P: MATH 2171. Formulation and solution of various types of problems using techniques of establishing a mathematical model.
2127. Basic Concepts of Mathematics (3) (F,S,SS) (FC:MA)
May not count toward MATH or CSCI major or minor. P: Appropriate score on math placement test. System of real numbers and subsystems and their properties from an algebraic viewpoint. Statistics and number theory.
2151. Engineering Calculus I (3) (S) FC:MA
3 lecture hours per week. P: MATH 1083 or 1085 or placement test criteria; or consent of instructor. Fundamentals of single variable differentiation with applications to problems in geometry, engineering, and physics. Includes applications to engineering areas.
2152. Engineering Calculus II (3) (S) FC:MA
3 lecture hours per week. P: MATH 2151 or 2171; or consent of instructor. Fundamentals of single variable integration with applications to problems in geometry, engineering, and physics. Includes applications to engineering areas such as, work and moments.
2153. Engineering Calculus III (3) (F) FC:MA
3 lecture hours per week. P: MATH 2152 or 2172; or consent of instructor. Fundamentals of vector functions and multivariable calculus including partial derivatives, multiple integrals, and vector calculus. Includes applications to engineering problems such as motion in space, and force fields.
2154. Engineering Linear Algebra and Differential Equations I (4) (S)
3 lecture and 2 lab hours per week P: ICEE 2050; MATH 2153. First order and second order linear differential equations, Laplace transforms, systems of equations and general matrix theory. Includes software applications to solve differential equations and systems of equations.
2171. Calculus I (4) (F,S,SS) (FC:MA)
P: minimum grade of C in any of MATH 1083, 1085, or 2122. First of three course sequence. Brief review of precalculus, limits and continuity, differentiation and its applications, and integration.
2172. Calculus II (4) (F,S,SS) (FC:MA)
P: MATH 2171 with a minimum grade of C or MATH 2122 with consent of instructor. Second of three-course sequence. Transcendental functions, applications of integrals, techniques of integration, and infinite series.
2173. Calculus III (4) (F,S,SS) (FC:MA)
P: MATH 2172 with a minimum grade of C. Third of three-course sequence. Conics, parametrized curves, polar coordinates, vectors and analytic geometry in space, partial derivatives, and multiple integrals.
2228. Elementary Statistical Methods I (3) (F,S,SS) (FC:MA)
For students with limited mathematical training. May not count toward MATH major or minor. May receive credit for one of MATH 2228, 2283. P: MATH 1065 or equivalent. Collection, systematic organization, analysis and interpretation of numerical data obtained in measuring certain traits of a given population.
2282. Data Analysis and Probability (3) (F,S) (FC:MA)
May not count toward MATH or CSCI major or minor. May receive credit for one of MATE or MATH 2282, 2935. P: MATE or MATH 1067. Collection of data from experiments and surveys. Organizing and representing data. Interpreting data for judging claims, making decisions, or making predictions.
2283. Statistics for Business (3) (F,S,SS) (FC:MA)
May receive credit for one of MATH 2228, 2283. P: MATH 1065 or 1066 or equivalent. Sampling and probability distributions, measures of central tendency and dispersion, hypothesis testing, Chi-square, and regression.
2300. Transition to Advanced Mathematics (3)
P: MATH 2171. Proof methods including induction, naïve set theory, functions and relations, cardinality, basic number theory, completeness of the real number system.
2427. Discrete Mathematical Structures (3) Same as CSCI 2427
May not count toward MATH major or minor. May receive credit for one of MATE or MATH 2775, 3237, or MATH 2427. P: MATH 1065 or 1066. Structures of discrete mathematical structures. Special emphasis is given to those structures most important in computer science. Considers practical applications of the subject.
2775. Topics in Discrete Mathematics (3) (S) (FC:MA)
For prospective teachers of secondary school math. May receive credit for one of MATE or MATH 2775, 3237 or MATH 2427. P: MATH 1085. Selected topics include counting techniques, graph theory, difference equations, recursion, iteration, induction, and dynamical systems.
2935. Data Analysis (3) (F) (FC:MA)
May receive credit for one of MATE or MATH 2282, 2935. P: MATH 1085. Introductory course utilizing hands-on approach to collection, representation, and interpretation of data. Topics include types of data, sampling techniques, experimental probability, sampling distributions, simulations, and hypothesis testing using collected.
3100. Mathematical Methods for Engineers and Scientists (4) (F,S,SS)
May not count toward MATH major or minor. May not be taken by students who have credit for MATH 2173 or MATH 3256 or MATH 4331. P: MATH 2172; or equivalent; or consent of instructor. Functions of several variables, partial derivatives, first and second order differential equations, matrices, determinants, cofactor expansions, vector spaces, linear independence/dependence, linear transformations, eigenvalues/eigenvectors, variation of parameters.
3166. Euclidean Geometry (3) (F,S) (FC:MA)
May not count toward MATH or CSCI major or minor. P: MATE 1067 or MATH 1065; 2127. Euclidean geometry using deductive and inductive mathematical reasoning. Formal proofs.
3174. Vector Calculus (3)
P: MATH 2173. Vector algebra and vector functions of single variable. Scalar and vector fields, line and surface integrals, and multiple integrals.
3229. Elementary Statistical Methods II (3)
For students with limited mathematical training. May not count toward MATH major or minor. P: MATH 2228 or equivalent. Collection, systematic organization, analysis, and interpretation of numerical data obtained in measuring certain traits of a given population.
3233. College Geometry (3) (F)
P: MATH 2300. Modern college geometry presented as outgrowth and extension of elementary plane geometry. Important theorems relative to nine-point circle, cross ratios, the geometry of circles, and solid geometry. Euclidean transformations discussed.
3237. Discrete Mathematics (3) (F) (FC:MA)
May not count toward MATH or CSCI major or minor. May receive credit for one of MATE or MATH 2775, 3237 or MATH 2427. P: MATH 2121. Logic and sets, mathematical induction, and matrices. Applications of discrete mathematics in probability, linear programming, dynamical systems, social choice, and graph theory.
3239. Applied Mathematics Via Modeling (3) (FC:MA)
May not count toward MATH or CSCI major or minor. P: MATE or MATH 2282, 3166, 3237; MATH 2122. Real world problems that can be modeled with algebra, geometry, calculus, and statistical, probabilistic, discrete, or other mathematical techniques appropriate for prospective teachers of middle school mathematics. Mathematical modeling processes examined through historical and contemporary modeling success stories. Power and limitations of mathematical modeling.
3256. Linear Algebra (3) (F,S,SS)
P: MATH 2172. Vector spaces, linear maps, matrices, systems of equations, determinants, and eigenvalues.
3263. Introduction to Modern Algebra (3) (WI) (F,S)
P: MATH 2300, 3256. Postulation viewpoint of modern algebra. Defining postulates for mathematical system exhibited from which properties of system are derived. Principal systems studied are groups, rings, fields, each fully treated with illustrative examples.
3273. Combinatorics (3)
P: MATH 2300. Advanced counting methods, recurrences, mathematical induction, generating functions. Additional topics from: graphs and trees, combinatorial designs, combinatorial games, error-correcting codes.
3301. Foundations of Geometry (3) (F)
P: MATH 2300. Axiomatic development of Euclidean and Non-Euclidean geometries. Analytic models and geometric transformations.
3307. Mathematical Statistics I (3) (F,S)
P: MATH 2172. Axiomatic development of theory of probability and its application to construction of certain mathematical models.
3308. Mathematical Statistics II (3)
P: MATH 3307. Construction of mathematical models for various statistical distributions. Testing of hypotheses and estimation, small-sample distributions, regression, and linear hypotheses.
3550, 3551. Mathematics Honors (2,1) (F,S,SS)
Acceptance in program entitles student to register for MATH 3550 or 3551. P: Exceptional mathematical ability; MATH 2173 or consent of instructor.
3573. Introduction to Numerical Analysis (3) Same as CSCI 3573
P: CSCI 2310 or consent of instructor; MATH 2119 or 2172 or equivalent. Algorithms suitable for digital computation in areas of linear algebra, linear programming, slope finding, area finding, and nonlinear equation solution.
3584. Computational Linear Algebra (3) (F,S,SS) Same as CSCI 3584
May not count toward MATH major or minor. P: Calculus course. Introduces vectors, matrices, and determinants. Special emphasis on application of linear algebra to solution of practical problems.
4031. Applied Statistical Analysis (3) (S)
P: MATH 2228 or 2283 or 3308; MATH 3256 or MATH/CSCI 3584; or equivalent; or consent of instructor. Topics include analysis of variance and covariance, experimental design, multiple and partial regression and correlation, nonparametric statistics, and use of computer statistical packages.
4101. Advanced Calculus I (3) (F,S)
P: MATH 2173, 2300; or consent of instructor. May receive credit for one of MATH 4101, 5101. Axioms of real number system, completeness, sequences, infinite series, power series, continuity, uniform continuity, differentiation, Riemann integral, and Fundamental Theorem of Calculus.
4110. Elementary Complex Variables (3)
P: MATH 2173. Complex numbers, analytic functions, mapping by elementary functions, integrals, residues, and poles.
4201. Introduction to Stochastic Processes (3)
P: MATH 3307 or equivalent or consent of instructor. Fundamental theory and models of stochastic processes. Expectations and independence, sums of independent random variables, Markov chains and their limiting behavior and applications, Poisson processes, birth and death processes; and Gaussian processes.
4264. Introduction to Modern Algebra II (3)
P: MATH 3263. Continuation of development of topics begun in MATH 3263. Normal subgroups, factor groups, homomorphisms, rings, ideals, quotient rings, and fields.
4322. Foundations of Mathematics (3) (F)
P: MATH 3233, 3263 or equivalent. Fundamental concepts and structural development of mathematics. Non-Euclidean geometries, logic, Boolean algebra, and set theory. Construction of complex number systems. Transfinite cardinal numbers and study of relations and functions. Topics developed axiomatically.
4331. Introduction to Ordinary Differential Equations (3) (F,S)
P: MATH 2173. Linear and nonlinear differential equations.
4332. The Calculus of Finite Differences (3)
P: MATH 2173. Discrete changes that take place in values of a function and its dependent variable due to discrete changes in independent variable.
4501, 4502, 4503. Independent Study (1,2,3) (F,S,SS)
For advanced math students. Number of hours per week will depend on credit hours and nature of work assigned. P: MATH major; consent of dept chair. Topics supplement regular curriculum.
4550, 4551. Mathematics Honors (2,1) (F,S,SS)
Acceptance in program entitles student to register for MATH 4550 or 4551. P: Exceptional mathematical ability; MATH 2173 or consent of instructor.
4774. Programming for Research (3)
P: MATH 2228 or 2283 or equivalent. Emphasis on minimum-level programming skill and use of statistical packages.
4801. Probability Theory (3) (F)
P: MATH 2173 or 3307. Axioms of probability, random variables and expectations, discrete and continuous distributions, moment generating functions, functions of random variables, Central Limit Theorem, and applications.
4999. Capstone and Statistical Consulting (3) (F,S)
1 hour lecture and 3 hours practicum per week. P: MATH 4031. Supervised statistical consulting experience related to prior coursework in statistics.
5000. Introduction to Sampling Design (3) (F)
P: MATH 3308 or 3229 or consent of instructor. Fundamental principles of survey sampling. Data sources and types, questionnaire design, various sampling schemes, sampling and nonsampling errors, and statistical analysis.
5002. Logic for Mathematics and Computer Science (3) (S) Same as CSCI 5002
P: CSCI 3200 or 3310 or MATE 3223 or 2775 or MATH 2427 or 2775 or 3256 or PHIL 3580 or equivalent. Methods of mathematical logic that have important applications in mathematics and computer science.
5021. Theory of Numbers I (3)
P: MATH 3263 or consent of instructor. Topics in elementary and algebraic number theory such as properties of integers, Diophantine equations, congruences, quadratic and other residues, and algebraic integers.
5031. Applied Statistical Analysis (3) (WI)
May not count toward math hours required for math MA. P: MATH 2228, 3584; or equivalent; or consent of instructor. Topics include analysis of variance and covariance, experimental design, multiple and partial regression and correlation, nonparametric statistics, and use of computer statistical package.
5101. Advanced Calculus I (3)
P: MATH 2173, 2300 or consent of instructor. May receive credit for one of MATH 4101, 5101. Axioms of real number system, completeness, sequences, infinite series, power series, continuity, uniform continuity, differentiation, Riemann integral, Fundamental Theorem of Calculus.
5102. Advanced Calculus II (3)
P: MATH 3256, 5101; or consent of instructor. Mathematical analysis of functions of several real variables. Includes limits, continuity, differentiation, and integration of multivariable functions.
5110. Elementary Complex Variables (3)
May not be taken for credit by those having completed MATH 6111. P: MATH 2173. Complex numbers, analytic functions, mapping by elementary functions, integrals, residues, and poles.
5121. Numerical Analysis in One Variable (3)
P: MATH 2173. Numerical analysis of problems with one independent variable. Solution of nonlinear equations in one unknown, interpolation and approximation of functions of one variable, numerical integration, and numerical differentiation and optimization.
5122. Numerical Analysis in Several Variables (3)
P: MATH 2173, 3256, 4331. Numerical analysis of problems with several independent variables. Numerical solution of ordinary differential equations, systems of linear equations, numerical linear algebra and matrix algebra, systems of nonlinear equations, and systems of ordinary differential equations.
5131. Deterministic Methods in Operations Research (3)
P: MATH 2173; 3307 or 5801. Mathematical models; linear programming; simplex method, with applications to optimization; duality theorem; project planning and control problems; and elementary game theory.
5132. Probabilistic Methods in Operations Research (3)
P: MATH 2173, 3256; 3307 or 5801. Introduces stochastic processes. Queuing theory with applications to inventory theory and forecasting, Poisson and Markov processes, reliability simulation, decision analysis, integer programming, and nonlinear programming.
5270. Pascal Using the Microcomputer (3)
May not be taken by students who have successfully completed CSCI 2610. May not count toward MATH or CSCI major or minor. P: MATH 1065 or equivalent. Pascal language and use in problem solving utilizing a microcomputer.
5311. Mathematical Physics (3) Same as PHYS 5311
P: MATH 4331; PHYS 2360; or consent of instructor. Mathematical methods important in physics. Emphasis on application. Functions of complex variables, ordinary and partial differential equations, integrals and integral transforms, and special functions.
5322. Foundations of Mathematics (3) (WI)
P: MATH 3233, 3263; or equivalent. Fundamental concepts and structural development of mathematics. Non-Euclidean geometries, logic, Boolean algebra, and set theory. Construction of complex number systems. Transfinite cardinal numbers and study of relations and functions. Topics developed as postulational.
5521. Readings and Lectures in Mathematics (3)
Individual work with student.
5551. The Historical Development of Mathematics (3)
P: MATH 3233; C: MATH 2172 or consent of instructor. History of mathematics from antiquity to present. Emphasis on study of significant problems which prompted development of new math. Uses computer resources and library for research of topics and solutions.
5581. Theory of Equations (3)
P: MATH 2173 or consent of instructor. Topics include operations with complex numbers, De Moivre’s Theorem, properties of polynomial functions, roots of general cubic and quartic equations, methods of determining roots of equations of higher degree, and methods of approximating roots.
5601. Non-Euclidean Geometry (3)
P: MATH 3233 or consent of instructor. Non-Euclidean geometries, finite geometries, and analysis of other geometries from point of view of properties which remain invariant under certain transformations.
5774. Programming for Research (3) Same as CSCI 5774
For graduate student who wishes to use computer science to meet required research skills of his or her dept. May not count toward MATH major or minor. P: General statistics course or consent of instructor. Emphasis on minimum-level programming skill and use of statistical packages.
5801. Probability Theory (3)
P: MATH 2173 or 3307. Axioms of probability, random variables and expectations, discrete and continuous distributions, moment generating functions, functions of random variables, Central Limit Theorem, and applications.
MATH Banked Courses
1063. College Algebra (3)
5252. Modern Mathematics for Elementary Teachers II (3)
5261, 5262. Modern Mathematics for Secondary Teachers I (3,3)
5301, 5302. Analytical Mechanics I (3,3)
5321, 6322. Applied Mathematics I, II (3,3)
5331. Introduction to Celestial Mechanics (3)
5610. Applied Analysis (3)

MGMT: Management

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3202. Fundamentals of Management (3) (F,S,SS)
Registration preference given to declared and intended majors with a minimum 2.5 GPA. P: ECON 2113. For non-business majors only. May receive credit for only one of MGMT 3202 and 3302. Organizational management, including managerial functions, understanding of individual needs and motivation, and managerial leadership.
3302. Management of Organizations (3) (F,S,SS)
For Business Majors Only. Credit cannot be earned for MGMT 3202 and MGMT 3302. Cannot be used to fulfill the requirements of the business minor. P: ECON 2113, ECON 2133, ACCT 2401. Examines fundamental management principles and shows how managers can improve organizational effectiveness by attending to the human side of the enterprise.
3352. International Business (3) (F,S,SS)
Registration preference given to declared and intended majors with a minimum 2.5 GPA. P: MGMT 3302. Framework within which international business is conducted. Analysis of typical business and economic problems in multinational business.
4001, 4002, 4003. Special Issues and Topics (1,2,3) (F,S)
May be repeated for maximum of 3 s.h. P: Business major; consent of dept chair and instructor. Individual study of special issues and topics in management and business. Subject approved by instructor.
4242. Organizational Behavior (3) (F,S)
Registration preference given to declared majors with a minimum 2.5 GPA. May receive credit for one of MGMT 4242, PSYC 3241. P: MGMT 3302. Human aspect of managing modern organizations. Modern theory and application of behavior with emphasis on applications.
4252. Entrepreneurship (3) (WI) (F)
Registration preference given to declared majors with a minimum 2.5 GPA. P: FINA 3724; MGMT 3302; MKTG 3832. New venture creation and management.
4262. Small Business Management (3) (WI) (F,S)
Registration preference given to declared majors with a minimum 2.5 GPA. 2 classroom and 2 lab hours per week. P: FINA 3724; MGMT 3202 or 3302; MKTG 3832. Student teams provide management counseling to area small businesses under continued supervision of instructor. Travel necessary. Drivers must provide copy of valid driver’s license and liability insurance. Drivers reimbursed for required travel.
4272. Managing the Family Business (3)
Registration preference given to declared majors with a minimum 2.5 GPA. P: MGMT 3302. Business, personal, and interpersonal issues associated with family owned and managed firms.
4342. Organizational Change and Development (3) (F,S) Formerly MGMT 3342
P: MGMT 3202 or 3302; MGMT 4242 or PSYC 3241. Registration preference given to declared and intended majors with a minimum 2.5 GPA. Basic, yet comprehensive, overview of organizational development. Evolution of field, key concepts, and methods that drive organizational development; techniques to diagnose opportunities for change; and tools to implement and evaluate organizational development initiatives.
4343. Organizational Leaders and Leadership (3) (F,S) Formerly MGMT 3343
P: MGMT 3202 or 3302; MGMT 4242 or PSYC 3241. Registration preference given to declared and intended majors with a minimum 2.5 GPA. Current and emerging leadership theories as bases for discussing leadership ability of both historical and contemporary organization managers.
4352. Management in a Global Economy (3) (S)
Registration preference given to declared majors with a minimum 2.5 GPA. P: FINA 4454 or MGMT 3352 or MKTG 4992. Application of US management practices in foreign economies and performance implications of applying foreign management practices in US economy. Ethical, legal, and social responsibility concerns.
4402. Human Resource Management (3) (F,S)
Registration preference given to declared majors with a minimum 2.5 GPA. P: MGMT 3202 or 3302. Management, procurement, development, maintenance, compensation, and utilization of effective working force by line and staff executives.
4422. Labor Relations (3)
Registration preference given to declared majors with a minimum 2.5 GPA. P: MGMT 3202 or 3302. Labor in US. History, structure and government of unions, labor law, collective bargaining processes, contract administration, and public sector organizations.
4482. Managerial Negotiation (3)
Registration preference given to declared majors with a minimum 2.5 GPA. P: MGMT 3302. Role of negotiation in management. Goal formation, buying and selling, employer-employee relations, and mergers and acquisitions. Various bargaining strategies and tactics.
4842. Strategic Management (3) (WI) (F,S,SS)
P: Senior standing; declared major in College of Business; FINA 3724; MKTG 3832; MGMT 3302; OMGT 3123. Integrated analysis of administration and policy determination from overall management point of view under conditions of uncertainty.
4952. Topics in Management (3) (F,S)
Registration preference given to declared majors with a minimum 2.5 GPA. May be repeated for credit with change of topic and consent of dept chair. P: Senior standing; MGMT 3302; consent of dept chair. Selected topics.
MGMT Banked Courses
3203. Organizational Management (3)
4472. Compensation Management (3)
4492. Personnel Decision Making (3)
4992. Internship (0)

MIDG: Middle Grades Education

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2123. Early Experiences for the Prospective Teacher (1) (F,S)
Minimum of 16 hours of directed observations and planned participation in appropriate school environments and 8 hours of seminar class instruction. P: Sophomore standing or consent of instructor. Introduction to teaching for prospective middle-school teachers.
3001. The Middle Grades (3) (WI)
10 clock hours practicum. P/C: MIDG 2123. Nature of pre-adolescent and organizational structure of middle school which supports developmentally appropriate levels of each student. Emphasis on cognitive, social, moral, physical, and psychological domains of development. Shadow experience with middle grades students.
3010. Middle Grades Curriculum and Planning (4)
12 practicum hours per week. P: Junior standing; MIDG 3001; C: MIDG 3022. Planning of curricular lessons, units, and courses of study in middle grades. Emphasis on organization of curriculum within structure of interdisciplinary planning, teaming, and instruction.
3022. Instructional Models and Strategies for Middle Grades (3)
P: MIDG 3001; C: MIDG 3010. Repertoire of teaching/learning strategies appropriate for middle-level classroom. Emphasis on practice and integration of strategies into curriculum planning process introduced in MIDG 3010.
4001. Organization, Management, and Motivation in the Middle Grades Classroom (3)
12 hours of clinical experience per week. P: Upper division standing.
4010. Instructional Evaluation in Middle Grades (3) (WI)
P: Upper division standing.; MIDG 3010, 3022; choose 2 from ENED or MIDG; or HIED or MATE or SCIE 4319. Traditional and authentic assessment for both middle grades students and teachers.
4319. Teaching English/Language Arts in the Middle Grades (3) Same as ENED 4319
12 hours of clinical experience per week. May not count toward foundations curriculum humanities requirement or as an advanced elective for ENGL majors. P: Admission to upper division; EDUC 3200; MIDG 3001, 3010, 3022; 10 s.h. in ENGL; C: MIDG 4010; HIED or MATE or SCIE 4319. Curriculum design and methods of teaching language arts in grades 6-9.
4324. Internship in the Middle Grades (10) 
Full-time, semester-long internship. P: Admission to upper division; EDUC 4400 or PSYC 4305; EDUC 3200; MIDG 4001, 4010; choose two methods courses from MIDG, HIED, MATE, SCIE 4319; C: MIDG 4325. Structured clinical internship. Student teaches under supervision for extended period of time in two content areas in classroom situation.
4325. Internship Seminar: Issues in Middle Grades Education (2)
P: Admission to upper division; C: MIDG 4324. Problems and/or issues vital to internship. Presentation of professional portfolio.
5991, 5992, 5993. Readings in Middle Grades Education (1,2,3) (5993:WI)
Each may be repeated once for a maximum of 6 s.h. P: Upper-level undergraduate or graduate standing.; consent of advisor. Directed readings on selected topics.

MIS: Management Information Systems

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2223. Introduction to Computers (3) (F,S,SS) Formerly DSCI 2223
Basic concepts of data processing and computer programming.
3063. Introduction to Management Information Systems (3) (F,S,SS) Formerly DSCI 3063
Registration preference given to declared and intended majors with a minimum 2.5 GPA. P: MIS 2223. Information systems in business and hardware and software tools to implement them.
3673. Software Design and Development (3) (F,S) Formerly DSCI 3673
Registration preference given to declared and intended majors with a minimum 2.5 GPA. P: MIS 3063. Design and development of software for business applications.
3943, 3953. Topics in Management Information Systems (1,2) (F,S) Formerly DSCI 3943, 3953
Registration preference given to declared and intended majors with a minimum 2.5 GPA. P: Consent of dept chair. Selected topics of contemporary interest in Management Information Systems.
4113. Data Base Management Systems (3) (F,S) Formerly DSCI 4113
Registration preference given to declared majors with a minimum 2.5 GPA. P: MIS 3063. Analysis of data base theory and practice.
4123. Telecommunications and Networked Systems (3) (F,S) Formerly DSCI 4123
Registration preference given to declared majors with a minimum 2.5 GPA. P: MIS 3063. Detailed study of evolving communication technology and management problems associated with communication networks.
4153. Web Application Development for Business (3) (F,S)
Registration preference given to declared majors with a minimum 2.5 GPA. P: MIS 3063. Exploration of evolving technologies that fuel modern day web applications for business and drive interactive web sites.
4163. Information Systems Analysis and Design (3) (F,S) Formerly DSCI 4163
Registration preference given to declared majors with a minimum 2.5 GPA. P: MIS 3063. Analysis and design of business information systems.
4173. Information Systems Development and Implementation (3) (F,S) Formerly DSCI 4173
Registration preference given to declared majors with a minimum 2.5 GPA. P: MIS 4163; P/C: MIS 3673. Implementation of business information systems using current technologies.
4963. Topics in Management Information Systems (3) (F,S,SS) Formerly DSCI 4963
Registration preference given to declared majors with a minimum 2.5 GPA. P: Consent of dept chair. Advanced topics of contemporary interest in Management Information Systems. Intended primarily for management information system majors.
4993. Cooperative Education (0) (F,S) Formerly DSCI 4993
Registration preference given to declared majors with a minimum 2.5 GPA. P: Consent of dept chair. Topics to supplement regular curriculum.
MIS Banked Courses
4103. Decision Support Systems (3) Formerly DSCI 4103
4133. Managing Information Systems Resources (3)

MKTG: Marketing

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3832. Marketing Management (3) (F,S,SS)
Registration preference given to declared and intended majors with a minimum 2.5 GPA. P: ECON 2113. Marketing concepts and their relevance to corporate objectives and methods of operation. Marketing environment, marketing mix, marketing planning and strategies implementation, and assessment of marketing performance.
3852. Cultural Environment of International Business (3) (F,S) Same as INTL 3852
Registration preference given to declared and intended majors with a minimum 2.5 GPA. P: Junior standing and completion of 3 s.h. in ECON. Cross-cultural differences in international relations and business management. Strategies and tactics to overcome cultural barriers to international trade, investment, and human relationships.
4332. Professional Selling (3)
Registration preference given to declared majors with a minimum 2.5 GPA. P: MKTG 3832. Role and activities of professional salesperson in modern marketing. Selling as profession, selected aspects of buyer behavior, sequential steps of selling process, and career development.
4342. Sales Force Management (3)
Registration preference given to declared majors with a minimum 2.5 GPA. P: MKTG 4332. Role and activities of sales manager in modern marketing. Brief review of personal selling, role of sales function in organization, and managerial tasks of designing, developing, directing, and compensating sales force.
4352. Selling and Sales Management (3) (F,S)
Registration preference given to declared majors with a minimum 2.5 GPA. P: MKTG 3832. Nature and importance of selling function, effective sales techniques, sales force recruiting, testing, selection, training, motivation, compensation, evaluation, and management.
4362. Retail Management (3)
Registration preference given to declared majors with a minimum 2.5 GPA. P: MKTG 3832. Retail structure and organization. Buying, selling, and pricing. Sales promotions and customer services. Establishment of retail business. Retail accounting control.
4532. Business and Organizational Marketing (3) (F,S)
Registration preference given to declared majors with a minimum 2.5 GPA. P: MKTG 3832. Strategic implications of marketing products or services to organizations. Focus on group buying processes, interfirm dynamics and relationship building, marketing mix considerations, and effects of global marketplace.
4562. Marketing Strategy (3) (F,S,SS)
Registration preference given to declared majors with a minimum 2.5 GPA. P: MKTG 3832; additional 6 s.h. in MKTG. Strategic frame work for selections of appropriate marketing mix to satisfy overall organizational objectives.
4662. Marketing Research (3) (F,S) (WI)
Registration preference given to declared majors with a minimum 2.5 GPA. P: MATH 2283; MKTG 3832. Development, validation, and execution of research design to solve marketing and other business problems based on primary and secondary data bases.
4732. Consumer Behavior (3) (F,S)
Registration preference given to declared majors with a minimum 2.5 GPA. P: MKTG 3832. Behavioral science concepts as related to processes of consumer motivation and buyer behavior.
4752. Advertising and Promotion Management (3)
Registration preference given to declared majors with a minimum 2.5 GPA. P: MKTG 3832. Development and evaluation of promotional strategies, programs, and plans.
4762. Services Marketing (3)
Registration preference given to declared majors with a minimum 2.5 GPA. P: MKTG 3832. Services marketing situations in different environments such as commercial, nonprofit, public sector and professional organizations. Development of appropriate marketing strategies and tactics to maximize customer and client satisfaction.
4790. Distribution Management (3) (F)
Registration preference given to declared majors with a minimum 2.5 GPA. P: MKTG 3832. Current approaches and procedures for attaining and maintaining effective manufacturer/distributor relationships. Channel participants, communication and other behavioral processes, selection and motivation of channel members, and international channel perspectives.
4972. Topics in Marketing (3)
Registration preference given to declared majors with a minimum 2.5 GPA. P: MKTG 3832; consent of dept chair. Selected topics.
4973. Topics in Marketing (2)
Registration preference given to declared majors with a minimum 2.5 GPA. P: MKTG 3832; consent of dept chair. Selected topics.
4974. Topics in Marketing (1)
Registration preference given to declared majors with a minimum 2.5 GPA. P: MKTG 3832; consent of dept chair. Selected topics.
4975. Electronic Commerce (3) (F,S)
P: MKTG 3832. Examines processes necessary to integrate a website into an organization’s strategic plan and basics of the Internet. Focuses on strategic application of website to enhance corporate profit, serve customers, and market organization. Covers improvement, maintenance, and promotion of site, including registering with search engines and directories.
4992. International Marketing (3) (WI) (S)
Registration preference given to declared majors with a minimum 2.5 GPA. P: MKTG 3832. International theory, environment, strategy, and problems.
MKTG Banked Courses
4462. Retailing Strategy (3)
4882. Physical Distribution Management (3)

MLSC: Military Science

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1001. Military Leadership and Personal Development I (1) (F)
C: MLSC 1011. Introduction to leadership doctrine and personal competencies essential for effective military leadership, including self-discipline, goal-setting, time management, physical fitness, and stress management.
1004. Military Leadership and Personal Development II (1) (S)
RP: MLSC 1001; C: MLSC 1014. Recommended prerequisite MLSC 1001. Instruction in the values, attributes, and actions considered necessary for effective military leadership. Includes essential communication skills and opportunities to practice effective listening, briefing, counseling, and writing.
1011. Basic Tactical Skills Lab I (1) (F)
C: MLSC 1001. Basic tactical skills, including orienteering, basic marksmanship, and battle drills. Students complete two-day field training exercise, rappelling, and combat water survival training.
1014. Basic Tactical Skills Lab II (1) (S)
RP: MLSC 1011; C: MLSC 1004. Improvement of basic tactical skills, including further instruction in orienteering, basic marksmanship, fire team movement and battle drills.
2001. Small Unit Leadership I (1) (F)
RP: MLSC 1001; C: MLSC 2011. Application of the time management process used by military leaders in receiving, planning, preparing, and executing missions. Includes instruction in team dynamics and role of the leader in training and developing small units.
2002. Small Unit Leadership II (1) (S)
RP: MLSC 2001; C: MLSC 2012. Examination of the challenges of leading military teams in the contemporary operating environment (COE). Focus on providing the knowledge necessary to analyze terrain, plan and issue operations orders, conduct patrols and other small unit military operations. Includes COE case studies, assessment of individual leadership styles, and exercise of communication and team building skills.
2011. Advanced Tactical Skills Lab I (1) (F)
RP: MLSC 1011; C: MLSC 2001. Practical experience in developing discipline and teamwork within a military organization and applying leadership techniques. Improvement of orienteering, basic marksmanship, fire team movement and battle drills through extended field training exercises and rigorous physical challenges.
2012. Advanced Tactical Skills Lab II (1) (S)
RP: MLSC 2011; C: MLSC 2002. Practical experience in developing discipline and teamwork within a military organization and applying leadership techniques. Further improvement of orienteering, basic marksmanship, fire team movement and battle drills through extended field training exercises and rigorous physical challenges.
3001. Tactical Leadership I (3) (F)
P: MLSC 1001, 1004, 2001, 2002; C: MLSC 3011. Development of advanced tactical leadership abilities through instruction on squad tactics, military problem-solving techniques, and troop-leading procedures. Focus on importance of reflection and self-evaluation, human behavior and the influence of culture on leadership, different leadership styles, and peer evaluation. Student will serve in leadership position within the Army ROTC battalion and receive systematic and specific feedback on leadership attributes and actions.
3002. Tactical Leadership II (3) (S)
P: MLSC 3001; C: MLSC 3012. Improvement of tactical leadership skills through further instruction on squad tactics; review of combat, stability, and support operations; and honing of briefing and communication skills. Focus on team dynamics, decision-making skills, and motivation of peers.
3003, 3004, 4003, 4004. Military Leadership and Development Independent Study (1,2,3,4) (F,S)
Provides ROTC Cadets who have completed their Advanced Course program the opportunity to conduct detailed research and independent study on a current problem or topic associated with military leadership. Program of study will be arranged individually with a faculty advisor.
3011. Tactical Leadership Lab I (1) (F)
P: MLSC 2012; C: MLSC 3001. Practical experience in writing and issuing operation orders, and in applying military problem-solving methods and troop-leading procedures as squad leaders in tactical scenarios.
3012. Tactical Leadership Lab II (1) (S)
P: MLSC 3011; C: MLSC 3002. Further practical experience in writing and issuing operation orders, and in applying military problem-solving methods and troop-leading procedures as squad leaders in tactical scenarios.
4001. Adaptive Military Leadership (3) (F)
Develops student proficiency in planning, executing, and assessing complex operations, functioning as a member of a staff, and providing performance feedback to subordinates. Cadets are instructed on how to assess risk, make ethical decisions, and lead fellow ROTC cadets. Lessons on military justice and personnel processes further prepare cadets for service as an Army officer.
4002. Modern Combat Leadership (3) (S)
Places significant emphasis on preparing cadets for their first assignment by exploring the dynamics of leading Soldiers in combat. Instruction focuses on ensuring that cadets understand the influence that culture, stress, and the other rigors of combat on the modern battlefield will have on their ability to lead effectively. Uses case studies, scenarios, and “What Now, Lieutenant?” exercises to prepare cadets to face the complex ethical and practical demands of leading as a commissioned officer in the United States Army.
4011. Advanced Military Leadership Lab I (1) (F)
Cadets function as the senior leadership within the Pirate Battalion, planning and executing a variety of tactical, leadership, and military skills labs for all assigned underclass cadets. With cadre supervision and guidance, cadets assist in the development of the underclass cadets and assume increased responsibility for the success and/or failure of all Pirate Battalion events.
4012. Advanced Military Leadership Lab II (1) (S)
Cadets continue to gain practical leadership experience while functioning as the senior Pirate Battalion leadership, planning and executing a variety of tactical, leadership, and military skills labs for all assigned underclass cadets. With cadre supervision and guidance, cadets assist in the development of the underclass cadets and assume increased responsibility for the success and/or failure of all Pirate Battalion events.
MLSC Banked Courses
1003. Military Management and Problem Solving (1)
 

MPRD: Media Production

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2210. Writing for the Electronic Mass Media (3) (WI) (F,S,SS) Formerly COMM 2210
P: COMM major or minor or consent of instructor; COMM 1001,1002. Key components of written electronic mass media. Variety of written assignments and development of comprehensive final project.
2215. Audio Production (3) (F,S,SS) Formerly COMM 2215
P: COMM major or minor or consent of instructor; COMM 1001,1002; MPRD 2210. Fundamental principles and techniques of writing copy for electronic news, advertising, and promotional mass media.
2220. Video Production (3) (F,S,SS) Formerly COMM 2220 Lecture and lab.
P: COMM major or minor or consent of instructor; COMM 1001,1002; MPRD 2210. Basic video production techniques and equipment.
2230. Announcing (3) (F,S,SS) Formerly COMM 2230
P: COMM major or minor or consent of instructor; COMM 1001, 1002. Development of applied speaking skills necessary for professional announcing employment
2250. Classic Documentaries, 1900-2000 (3) Formerly COMM 2250
May not count toward foundations curriculum social sciences requirement. P: COMM major or minor or consent of instructor; COMM 1001,1002, Content, style, structure, production, purpose, and sociological impact of twentieth century long-format visual documentary in film and video from historical, theoretical, and artistic perspectives.
2260. Image Theory and Aesthetics (3) Formerly COMM 2260
P: COMM major or minor or consent of instructor; COMM 1001,1002, Exploration of the principles of media aesthetics (e.g. light, space, time-motion, and sound) across various genres of media production.
3020. Videography and Lighting (3) Formerly COMM 3020
P: COMM major; consent of instructor; COMM 1001,1002; MPRD 2220, 2260; C: MPRD 3250. Intensive focus upon the craft and aesthetics of videography and lighting design and execution for location and studio-based settings.
3070. Multimedia Production Laboratory (3) Formerly COMM 3070
1 lecture and 6 lab hours per week. May not count toward foundations curriculum social sciences requirement. P: COMM 1001,1002, 2103; consent of instructor. Independent practical work in multimedia production with faculty supervision.
3212. Non-News Media Features (3) Formerly COMM 3212
P: COMM major or minor or consent of instructor; COMM 1001, 1002, 2320. Basic approaches and techniques used to design and write documentaries, investigative reports, and other media features
3215. Advanced Audio Production (3) (F,S) Formerly COMM 3215
P: COMM 1001,1002; MPRD 2215. Advanced recording, production, and editing techniques for radio and recording studio applications.
3220. Video News Production (3) Formerly COMM 3220
P: COMM major or consent of instructor; COMM 1001,1002. Electronic news gathering for television journalists; writing, video field production, and video editing of television news packages.
3235. Advanced Writing for Media (3) Formerly COMM 3235
P: COMM major or consent of instructor; COMM 1001,1002; MPRD 2210. Writing professional series or feature length and short form narrative scripts.
3242. Advanced Studio Production (3) Formerly COMM 3242
May not count toward foundations curriculum social sciences requirement. P: COMM major or minor or consent of instructor; COMM 1001, 1002. Creative and technical skills and theoretical framework needed in studio production environment.
3250. Video Post Production Techniques (3) Formerly COMM 3250
May not count toward foundations curriculum social sciences requirement. P: COMM major or minor or consent of instructor; COMM 1001, 1002. Advanced post production non-linear editing techniques for analog and digital video, including A/B roll editing, digital video effects, and electronic graphics.
3275. Advanced Video Production (3) (F,S,SS) Formerly COMM 3275
P: COMM major or minor or consent of instructor; COMM 1001,1002;MPRD 3250. Advanced elements of video production.
3280. Video Magazine Practicum (3) Formerly COMM 3280
1 lecture and 6 lab hours (to be arranged) per week. May not count toward foundations curriculum social sciences requirement. May be repeated for maximum of 6 s.h. credit. P: COMM major or minor; COMM 1001, 1002, 2103; consent of instructor. Lab for students working on university’s video yearbook, the Treasure Chest, or other team-oriented video production projects used in public relations and journalism.
3291, 3292, 3293. Production Practicum (1,2,3) (F,S,SS) Formerly COMM 3291, 3292, 3293
Minimum of 6 hours of practical work per week for each hour of credit. Maximum of 3 s.h. may count toward COMM major. P: COMM major or minor or consent of instructor. COMM 1001, 1002. Faculty guidance in some area of communication.
3500. Web Design for Communication Professionals (3) Formerly COMM 3500
May not count toward foundations curriculum social sciences requirement. P: COMM major or minor or consent of instructor; COMM 1001, 1002 Essential design and building techniques to create web pages for the World Wide Web.
3660. History of the Moving Image (3) Formerly COMM 3660
May not count toward foundations curriculum social sciences requirement. P: COMM major or minor or consent of instructor; COMM 1001, 1002. Examines development of media that utilize moving visual image. Covers history of cinema from 1890s to present and history of television from early 20th century to present.
4210. Video Direction (3) (F,S) Formerly COMM 4210
P: COMM major or minor or consent of instructor; COMM 1001, 1002; MPRD 3275. Analysis and practice of dramatic video direction.
4220. Video Performance (3) (F,S,SS) Formerly COMM 4220
P: COMM major or minor or consent of instructor; COMM 1001, 1002; MPRD 2230. Practical experience in techniques involved in on-camera video presentations.
4250. Media Production Capstone (3) Formerly COMM 4250
P: COMM major or consent of instructor; all required COMM/MPRD courses under 4000. P/C: MPRD 4210 or 4280. Career launch strategizing, service learning via production of public service announcements for non-profits, and compilation of professional portfolio including production reel.
4280. Digital Practicum for Professional Distribution (3) Formerly COMM 4280
P: COMM major; consent of instructor; all required COMM/MPRD courses under 4000. Practical experience with instructor mentored/student executed television or internet programming and/or corporate videos. Selective admission.
MPRD Banked Courses
2400. Oral Communication (3)
3325. Reporting for Visual Media (3)
4190. International Communication and Foreign Media (3)
4240. International Electronic Mass Media Systems (3)

MRCH: MERCHANDISING

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1135. Principles of Merchandising (3) Formerly IDMR 1135
Principles of merchandising as applied to textile, apparel, and interiors industries. Survey of supply, manufacture, distribution, and auxiliary industries and fashion terminology, creators, and careers.
2034. Textiles (3) Formerly IDMR 2034
P: Merchandising majors; C: MRCH 2035. Textile fibers and fabrics. Emphasis on quality, performance, care, and selection. Introduction to textile industry.
2035. Textiles Laboratory (1) Formerly IDMR 2035
P: Merchandising majors; C: IDSN 2040 or MRCH 2034. Assessment of textile fibers and fabrics as related to quality and performance.
2239. Apparel and Human Behavior (3) Formerly IDMR 2239
Cultural, social, psychological, and economic aspects of apparel which affect selection and use of apparel by consumer.
2350. Merchandising Strategies (3) Formerly IDMR 2350
P: MRCH 1135. Introduces theories and concepts in soft goods retailing. Investigates strategic planning process in apparel and interiors retailing.
2500. Survey of Historic Costume Through the 18th Century (3)
A study of clothing worn by men, women, and children from prehistory to the end of the eighteenth century. Course will focus on political, cultural, economic, and social forces on clothing as well as stylistic changes.
2999. Pre-Professional Merchandising Seminar (3)
P: MRCH 1135; IDSN 1180 or MRCH 2239; MRCH 2350. Sophomore capstone course which introduces students to careers in merchandising, job search tactics, and community practice of merchandising skills.
3001, 3002, 3003. Special Topics (1,2,3) Formerly IDMR 3001, 3002, 3003
May be repeated for credit with change of topic. P: Consent of instructor; may vary by topic offered. Special topics in selected areas of apparel, interiors, and merchandising. Variable titles, content, and hours.
3050. Quality Analysis: Apparel (3) Formerly IDMR 3050
P: MRCH 2034; 2035; Merchandising majors. Evaluates apparel construction through identification, differentiation, and analysis. Relationship between product quality and production, distribution, and consumption of apparel.
3200. Consumer Studies in Merchandising (3) Formerly IDMR 3200
P: Merchandising majors or minors; MRCH 2350. Consumer motivation and purchasing behavior in apparel and interiors products.
3307. Nineteenth and Twentieth Century Costume (3) (WI) Formerly IDMR 3307
P: Merchandising majors or minors; MRCH 2239. Chronological survey of development and characteristics of western dress from nineteenth century to the present.
3350. Merchandising Analysis (3) Formerly IDMR 3350
P: Merchandising majors or minors; MRCH 2350. Buying, management, and operations in apparel and interiors industry, including wholesale and retail. Emphasis on analysis techniques utilized by merchandisers.
3400. Visual Merchandising, Planning, and Operations (3) Formerly IDMR 3400
P: Merchandising majors or minors; MRCH 1135. Promotion of apparel and interior furnishings throughout production and distribution systems. Emphasis on merchandising concepts and strategies that convey product characteristics.
3401. Visual Merchandising/CAD Lab (1)
P: MRCH 3400. Practical application of visual merchandising planning and operational concepts. Projects may consist of software-based learning, service-learning, and community and campus outreach experiences.
4001, 4002, 4003. Independent Study: Apparel, Textiles, Interiors Merchandising (1,2,3) Formerly IDMR 4001, 4002, 4003
P: Junior standing. Problems in apparel, textiles, interiors and merchandising.
4209. Directed Study: Research in Merchandising (3) (WI) Formerly IDMR 4209
P: Senior standing; Merchandising majors or minors. Research methods and applications in merchandising of apparel, textile, and interior furnishing products.
4300. Global Economics: Textiles, Apparel, and Interior Furnishing Industries (3) (WI) Formerly IDMR 4300
P: MRCH 2034 or IDSN 2040; ECON 2113. Global economic issues affecting these industries and their impact on merchandising and consumption of these end-use products.
4350. Merchandise Buying and Sourcing (3) Formerly IDMR 4350
P: MRCH 3350. Theoretically based decision-making in forecasting, buying, and sourcing of apparel and interiors products with computer applications.
4400. International Merchandising (3)
P: MRCH 3200; Senior merchandising major. Comparative overview of merchandising practices in selected international environments, with special emphasis on the apparel and home furnishings industries.
4883. Merchandising Internship (3) (WI) (F,SS) Formerly AMID 4883 
200 work hours. P: IDMR 3883; senior merchandising major; minimum cumulative 2.5 GPA; consent of instructor. Supervised work experience to enhance student’s competency in merchandising through integration of theory and practice.
4999. Merchandising Capstone: Executing the Concept (3)
P: 4350; senior merchandising major. Application of merchandising concepts in the execution of a merchandise plan and the development and presentation of apparel and interiors products to complete the plan.
MRCH Banked Courses
2003. Apparel Construction for Secondary Education (2)
2004. Apparel Construction for Secondary Education Laboratory (1)
2301. Computer Applications in Merchandising (3)
3883. Professional Development in Merchandising (2)
4308. Professional Development in Merchandising, Apparel, and Textiles (3)
4333. Quality Analysis: Textiles (2)
5338. Problems in Apparel, Merchandising, and Interior Design (3)

MRST: MEDIEVAL AND RENAISSANCE STUDIES

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2000. Introduction to Medieval and Renaissance Studies (3) (FC:HU)
May count toward elective requirement of MRST minor or foundations curriculum humanities requirement. Medieval and Renaissance studies via art, English, foreign languages and literatures, history, music, and philosophy.
2400. Introduction to Medieval Studies (3) (FC:HU)
Comprehensive interdisciplinary orientation to the European Middle Ages (c. 300-1450), integrating decisive contributions in humanistic disciplines, religion, and the arts.
2500. Introduction to Renaissance Studies (3) (FC:HU)
Comprehensive interdisciplinary orientation to the European Renaissance era (c. 1300-1650), integrating decisive contributions in humanistic disciplines, religion (including the Reformation), and the arts.
5000. Medieval and Renaissance Studies Seminar (3)
P: 3 s.h. in MRST or consent of director. Interdisciplinary seminar.

MULT: MULTIDISCIPLINARY STUDIES

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3500. Research in Multidisciplinary Studies (3) (WI)
P: Admission to MULT; consent of program director. First of two-course sequence. Independent thesis research/creative project. Supervised by a faculty member.
4999. Seminar in Multidisciplinary Studies (3) (WI)
P: MULT 3500; consent of program director. Seniors from all disciplines complete, present, and discuss their theses/creative projects with fellow students, faculty mentors, and program director.
 

MUSC: MUSIC

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1000. Recital (0)
Studio, student, and senior recitals. Lab for all music majors.
4507, 4508, 4509. Topics and Issues in Music (1,2, or 3)
May be repeated for credit. P: Consent of instructor. Research of relevant problems and issues.
4550. Music Honors Program (2)
May be repeated for maximum of 4 s.h. P: Senior standing; minimum 3.0 GPA. Elective program. May be elected in lieu of senior electives in theory and/or music history and literature.

MUSC: APPLIED MUSIC, GROUP

Applied music fee for all private and group courses is $35 per semester hour credit.
1105, 1115. Beginning Group Piano (1,1)
Required of all non-keyboard music minors and those non-keyboard music majors who are not able to meet requirements for entrance into MUSC 2105. 2 sessions per week. Instruction in classes of 4 or more students. May count toward minor applied music requirement. P for 1115: MUSC 1105. Functional use of piano. Piano proficiency for music majors and minors. Student must earn minimum grade of C in each course to satisfy piano proficiency requirements.
1205, 1215. Beginning Voice Group (1,1)
Required of all beginning voice minors. 2 sessions per week. Instruction in classes of 4 or more students. May count toward minor applied music requirement. P for 1215: MUSC 1205. Fundamentals of vocal production and some literature.
1305, 1315. Functional Piano for Singers I, II (1,1)
May not count toward foundations curriculum fine arts requirement. P: Music major. Basic keyboard fluency for singers. Preparation for departmental keyboard proficiency exam required of all voice performance majors.
1415. Woodwind Group (1)
May be repeated for credit. 2 1-hour labs per week. Instruction in classes of 4 or more students. May count toward minor applied music requirement. Develop basic playing ability and methodology of teaching woodwind instruments.
1435. Brass Group (1)
2 sessions per week. Instruction in classes of 4 or more students. May count toward minor applied music requirement. Develop basic playing ability on common brass instruments.
1445. Percussion Group (1)
2 sessions per week. Instruction in classes of 4 or more students. May count toward minor applied music requirement. Fundamentals and teaching techniques.
2105, 2115. Intermediate Group Piano (1,1)
Required of all non-keyboard music majors who are not able to meet proficiency requirements. 2 sessions per week. Instruction in classes of 4 or more students. May count toward minor applied music requirement. P for 2105: MUSC 1115; P for 2115: MUSC 2105. Functional use of piano. Proficiency for music majors. Successful completion of sequence satisfies piano proficiency requirements for some concentrations. Student must earn minimum grade of C in each course to satisfy piano proficiency requirements.
2125, 2135. Basic Keyboard Skills (1,1) (2125: F02; 2135: S03) Same as MUSC 2125, 2135 (Pedagogy)
2 sessions per week. Instruction in classes of 4 or more students. May count toward minor applied music requirement. P for 2135: MUSC 2125. Functional use of piano for music majors and minors whose primary performance medium is keyboard instrument.
2315. String Class (1) (F)
2 1-hour labs per week. Instruction in classes of 4 or more students. May count toward minor applied music requirement. Develop basic playing ability and methodology of teaching string instruments.
2455, 2465, 3455, 3465, 4455. Accompanying (1 each) Same as MUSC 2455, 2465, 3455, 3465, 4455 (Performance Groups, Small)
1 hour per week and supervised accompanying of singers and instrumentalists. Instruction in classes of 4 or more students. May count toward minor applied music requirement. May be repeated for credit. P for 2465, 3455, 3465, 4455: MUSC 2455. Skills, sight reading, transposition, and style required of accompanists.
3105, 3115. Functional Guitar Class (1,1) (F,S)
For prospective music teachers and music therapists. 2 sessions per week. Instruction in classes of 4 or more students. May count toward minor applied music requirement. P for 3105: MUSC 2115 or consent of instructor; P for 3115: MUSC 3105 or consent of instructor. Use of guitar as functional accompanying instrument in classroom music teaching.

MUSC: APPLIED MUSIC, PRIVATE


Applied music fee for all private and group courses is $35 per semester hour credit.

Courses in applied music are required for all music majors and are open to qualified non-music major university students when teaching time is available.

Minor applied students receive one half-hour lesson per week. Major applied students receive one hour lesson per week.

Each music major is required to have a performance medium. The minimum entrance performing proficiency level is III, and the minimum graduation level ranges from VI to VIII. A minimum of a half recital is required of all music majors for graduation; 2 recitals are required of performance majors. 2 semester hours credit per semester is required as a minimum for the major performing medium. Instruction is available for the following instruments:

01-Piano 07-Violin 13-Oboe 18-Horn
02-Organ 08-Viola 14-Bassoon 19-Trombone
03-Harpsichord 09-Cello 15-Clarinet 20-Euphonium
05-Guitar 10-String Bass 16-Saxophone 21-Tuba
06-Voice 11-Flute     (alto or tenor) 22-Percussion
17-Trumpet 23- Jazz

In addition to the above, instruments such as piccolo, English horn, bass clarinet, contrabasson, etc., may be studied in conjunction with 1 of these applied majors, but not as a separate major or minor.

Catalog numbers are set by the registrar as follows: the first digit indicates level, the middle 2 digits indicate the applied areas as listed above, and the last digit indicates credit. Credit is variable: 1-4 s.h. If the last digit is 0, the applied music course is for students who do not meet minimum performance proficiency requirements as determined by the student’s auditioning committee and the course may not count toward foundations curriculum fine arts requirements, certification, or degree requirements.No applied music course may count toward foundations curriculum requirements.

Below are the catalog numbers and credit for each class. The 2 digits to be substituted for the blanks will indicate the applied area, as listed above. For example, Lower-Level Applied Piano for 1 credit is MUSC 1011. All applied music courses may be repeated for credit.

1_ _0 Lower-Level Applied Music (2) 3_ _0 Upper-Level Applied Music (2)
1_ _1 Lower-Level Applied Music (1) 3_ _1 Upper-Level Applied Music (1)
1_ _2 Lower-Level Applied Music (2) 3_ _2 Upper-Level Applied Music (2)
1_ _3 Lower-Level Applied Music (3) 3_ _3 Upper-Level Applied Music (3)
1_ _4 Lower-Level Applied Music (4) 3_ _4 Upper-Level Applied Music (4)


MUSC: CONDUCTING

3156, 3166. Conducting (1,1)
P: MUSC 2166, 2186; P for 3166: MUSC 3156. Skills relevant to performance of instrumental and choral music.
5706, 5716. Advanced Applied Conducting (3,3)
May be repeated for credit. Applied instrumental or choral conducting techniques. Score reading and analytical studies to develop knowledgeable interpretation of compositions for performance.

MUSC: JAZZ STUDIES

1231, 1232, 1233, 1234. Lower-Level Applied Jazz (1,2,3,4) (F,S,SS)
May be repeated for credit. P: MUSC 2166, 2186; or consent of instructor. Application of principles and techniques used in performance practices in various jazz styles. Style periods include Dixieland, swing, bebop, cool, contemporary, and electronic jazz.
2095, 2096. Jazz Keyboard Harmony (2,2)
P for 2095: MUSC 2115, 2166, 2186; or consent of instructor. Application of principles of twentieth century jazz keyboard harmony, form, and structure from ragtime to present.
2195. Jazz Improvisation (2)
P: MUSC 1115, 2166, 2186; or consent of instructor. Application of techniques.
2196. Advanced Jazz Improvisation (2)
P: MUSC 2195 or consent of instructor. Continuation of MUSC 2195. Emphasis on performance, transcription of solos, original compositions, and advanced ear training in current jazz idioms.
2295, 2296. Jazz Theory and Arranging (2,2)
P for 2295: MUSC 2166, 2186; or consent of instructor; P for 2296: MUSC 2295. Music theory for jazz. Analysis of various styles performed in twentieth century. Choral substitution and extended harmonies. Arranging in different styles for variety of instrumentations.
2395. Rhythm Section Concepts (2) 
May be repeated for credit. P: Audition or consent of instructor. Performance practices used by traditional, contemporary, and augmented rhythm section.
3231, 3232, 3233, 3234. Upper-Level Applied Jazz (1,2,3,4) (F,S,SS)
May be repeated for credit. P: MUSC 2166, 2186; or consent of instructor. Application of principles and techniques used in performance practices in various jazz styles. Style periods include Dixieland, Swing, Bebop, Cool, and Contemporary Eras and electronic jazz.
4195. Jazz Seminar (3) (F,S,SS)
P: Passing score on jazz studies upper division exam; MUSC 1406, 2258, 2406, 2416. Analyze, research, and study of important innovators, musicians, educators, musical concepts, compositions, and developments of jazz eras from 1900 to present. Dixieland, Swing, Bebop, Cool, and Contemporary Eras.

MUSC: MUSIC EDUCATION

2123. Early Experiences for the Prospective Teacher (1) (S)
For prospective teachers. Minimum of 16 hours of directed observations and planned participation in appropriate school environments and 8 hours of seminar class instruction in the teaching area. May not count toward a major or minor for the BA degree. P: Completion of 8 s.h. in theory, composition, and musicology or consent of music education chair. Introduction to teaching of music.
3217. Beginning Instruction in Instrumental Music (2) (F)
P: Completion of lower-level competencies in music education; acceptance into music education degree program; MUSC 2123. Criteria for selection and utilization of music and materials suitable for elementary school children. Role of beginning instrumental music in schools and its relationship to total school program.
3227. Rehearsal Techniques in Secondary Instrumental Music Education (2) (S)
P: MUSC 3217. Teaching techniques applicable to large-group instrumental rehearsals, study of suitable materials, orientation to philosophy and its application in teaching sessions, and self-evaluation.
3237. Beginning Instruction in Vocal-General Music Education (2) (F)
P: Completion of lower-level competencies in music education; acceptance into music education degree program; MUSC 2123. Identification of elements of music and their components. Planning and evaluation of teaching experiences in general music classroom and consideration of voice classification and vocal technique in elementary school. Role of choral program in schools and its relationship to total school program.
3247. Rehearsal Techniques in Secondary Vocal-Choral Music Education (2) (S)
P: MUSC 3237. Teaching techniques applicable to large-group choral rehearsals, study of junior- and senior-high choral literature, orientation to philosophy and its application to choral rehearsal, and self-evaluation.
3277. Marching Band Practices and Techniques (2)
P: 2 years of experience in the university marching band or consent of instructor. Training of marching band. Emphasis on efficient use of rehearsal time and various styles of presentations.
3287. Choral Laboratory (1)
Primarily for music education majors and conducting students. 2 1-hour sessions per week. May be repeated for credit. P: Completion of or enrollment in MUSC 3156 or 3217 or 3237 or consent of instructor. Application of rehearsal skills, choral sight reading, and musicianship development.
3697. Introduction to String Teaching (2) Same as MUSC 3697 (Pedagogy)
P: MUSC 2115; 2305 or 2315. Principles of string teaching and their application to individual and group settings. Emphasis on elementary and secondary schools. Critical examination and evaluation of string instruction materials.
4323. Materials and Methods of Instrumental Music Teaching (2) (F)
P: Admission to upper division; MUSC 3227. Instrumental pedagogy with additional concentration on developing course objectives, evaluative procedures, rehearsal techniques, administrative procedures, and discipline as related to secondary school instrumental program.
4324. Internship in Music Education (10) (S)
Full-time, semester-long internship. P: Admission to upper division; MUSC 4323 or 4333; C: MUSC 4325. Internship in assigned school under direction of master teacher and university supervisor.
4325. Internship Seminar: Issues in Music Education (0) (S)
P: Admission to upper division; C: MUSC 4324. Individualized study of problems or issues pertinent to music education during music internship experience.
4333. Materials and Methods of Vocal-General Music Teaching (2) (F)
P: MUSC 3247. Techniques of organization, administration, motivation, discipline, and innovative techniques associated with choral-vocal programs in secondary schools.
5937. Teaching Music in the Elementary School (3)
May not count toward foundations curriculum fine arts requirement. Materials, techniques, and all phases of elementary school music program.
5947. Choral Problems and Techniques (2)
Seminar in problems pertaining to rehearsal and performance of choral music.
5957. Instrumental Problems and Techniques (3)
Seminar in problems pertaining to elementary, middle school, and secondary school instrumental music programs.
5977. General Music in the Secondary Schools (3)
May not count toward foundations curriculum fine arts requirement. Contemporary concepts in teaching at middle, junior, and senior high school levels. Examination of literature and materials.

MUSC: MUSIC HISTORY AND LITERATURE

1406, 2406, 2416. Music History and Literature (3,3,2) (WI)
P for 2406: MUSC 1406; P for 2416: MUSC 2406. Three-semester survey of Western Music proceeding chronologically from Antiquity to modern times. Emphasis on style, genre, and cultural context.
3055. History of the American Musical Theatre (3) Same as THEA 3055
P: MUSC 2166 or consent of instructor. Styles and periods.
4436. Symphonic Music (2)
P: MUSC 1406, 2406, 2416. Development of orchestral forces, repertoire, and symphonic conceptions from the Pre-Classic era through the 20th Century. Emphasis on forms, styles, and historical issues in the symphony, symphonic poem, and concerto.
4496. Opera History (2) (WI) (S03) Formerly MUSC 5796
P: MUSC 2416. History of lyric theatre from late sixteenth century to present. Emphasis on examples from outstanding operas of various periods in music history.
4596. Historical Development of Solo Vocal Literature (2) (S04) Formerly MUSC 5616
P: Senior standing; undergraduate survey of music history; MUSC 2416. History with concentration on literature of major composers.
4658. Musical Aesthetics and Criticism (3) (WI)
P: MUSC 1406, 2406, 2416. Pro-seminar devoted to issues of judging artistic value in music through the discipline of aesthetics and through various modes of music criticism raised by seminal figures such as Aristotle and Kant. Subsequent focus on value judgment in relation to music aesthetics and criticism.
5406. Music of the Baroque Era (2)
P: MUSC 2416 or consent of instructor. 1600-1750. All types of music from Monteverdi and Schutz to Bach and Handel in relation to philosophical background of times and the arts.
5416. Music of Rococo and Classic Periods (2)
P: MUSC 2416 or consent of instructor. 1720-1800. Development of homophony, “style gallant,” developments in symphony, sonata, concerto, and opera in relation to social, economic, and political conditions of times. Haydn, Mozart, and Beethoven.
5426. Music of the Romantic Era (2) (WI)
P: MUSC 2416 or consent of instructor. 1800-1900. All types of music against backdrop of literary revolt and development of humanitarian philosophy. From Schubert to end of century.
5436. Twentieth-Century Music (2) (WI)
P: MUSC 2416 or consent of instructor. 1900 to present. All types of music keyed to developments in culture and related arts. Trends and “isms” from Debussy to present.
5456. Introduction to Ethnomusicology (2)
P: MUSC or ANTH major with consent of instructor. Theories, methods, techniques, and fundamental concepts used in study of non-Western and primitive music.
5466. Folk and Indigenous Music of Europe and the Americas (2)
P: Area minors and ANTH majors with consent of instructor; undergraduate MUSC course. Ethnic music of the West surveyed with particular attention to society, culture, and tradition.
5476. African Music (2)
P: Open to area minors and ANTH majors with consent of instructor. Sub-Saharan African music surveyed in the context of African society and culture.
5506. Early Music in the West: to 1600 (3)
P: MUSC 1406, 2406, 2416; or equivalent. Genres, sources, theoretical literature, and cultural contexts of western art music from Late Antiquity through end of Renaissance. Pro-seminar format.
5516. Ibero-American Musics of the Twentieth Century (3) (WI)
P: MUSC 2166 or consent of instructor. Comprehensive overview from ethnomusicological perspective. Vernacular musics of Spanish- and Portugese-speaking cultures and their influence on art-music composers of twentieth century.
5667, 5677. Organ History, Literature, and Design (2,2) Same as MUSC 5667, 5677 (Sacred Music)
P: MUSC 2416 or consent of instructor. Recommended to be taken in sequence. Historical survey of organ literature from earliest manuscripts through music of J. S. Bach in first term. From J. S. Bach to present in second term. Basic principles of organ construction and style. Emphasis on relationship between organ and its repertoire throughout centuries.
5737. Piano Literature and Advanced Pedagogy (3)
Recommended that MUSC 5737, 5747 be taken in sequence. Literature for piano in relation to contemporary pedagogical use. Intermediate through advanced-level literature from Renaissance through Beethoven and Schubert.
5747. Piano Literature and Advanced Pedagogy (3)
Recommended that MUSC 5737, 5747 be taken in sequence. Literature for piano in relation to contemporary pedagogical use. Intermediate through advanced-level literature from Chopin and Schumann to present.
5757. Lute and Guitar Literature (3)
Comprehensive survey of solo literature for lute and guitar from Renaissance to twentieth century.
5887, 5897. Survey of Performance Practice (2,2)
P: MUSC 2416 or consent of instructor. Original and secondary sources on performance practices from Renaissance to present. Development of instruments and comparison of notated music with actual performance practices.
5906, 5916. Choral Literature (2,2)
Historical and stylistic survey and critical evaluation of choral literature for use with school, community, and sacred choirs.
5926. Wind Instrument Literature (3)
Chamber music, band, wind, and percussion literature for all phases of instrumental instruction.

MUSC: MUSIC PEDAGOGY

4660. Percussion Pedagogy and Literature
P: Upper division standing in applied music. Study of pedagogical methods and performance materials for percussion instruments of Western art music.

MUSC: MUSIC TECHNOLOGY

2280. Introduction to Music Technology (2) (F)
P: MUSC major or consent of instructor. Basic concepts in acoustics, psychoacoustics, and electroacoustics and their application to computer music programs and keyboard synthesizers.
3300. Creating Media Software for Music Instruction (2) (S)
Computer-authoring programs for instruction and development of original multimedia applications.

MUSC: MUSIC THERAPY

2277. Orientation to Therapy (1)
For students who plan to major in music therapy. 1 classroom and/or lab hour per week. Overview of music in therapy.
2287. Orientation to Therapy Practicum (1)
1 classroom and/or lab hour per week. Orientation to music in therapy through observation and participation in music therapy programs in variety of treatment settings.
3257. Music Therapy I: Introduction to Music in Therapy (3)
C: MUSC 3357. Current trends and historical bases for use of music in therapy.
3267. Music Therapy II: The Influence of Music on Behavior (3)
P: MUSC 3257; C: 3367. Theoretical bases and experimental evidence of influence of music on human behavior and development of clinical procedures.
3297. Orientation to Therapy (1)
Supervised field experience. P: Music therapy major; completion of sophomore year in music or consent of instructor. Orientation to use of music therapy in various rehabilitation and therapeutic centers.
3357. Music Therapy Practicum (1)
Supervised practicum for music therapy majors. 1 classroom and/or lab hour per week. C: MUSC 3257. Application of music therapy procedures and techniques in approved treatment setting.
3367. Music Therapy Practicum II (1)
Supervised practicum for music therapy majors. 1 classroom and/or lab hour per week. C: MUSC 3267. Application of music therapy procedures and techniques in approved treatment setting.
4277. Music for Group Activities (2) Same as MUSC 4277 (Non-music Majors)
Open to recreation and leisure studies and allied health majors. C: MUSC 4287. Organization and development of social and recreational music activities. Emphasis on therapeutic function.
4287. Music for Group Activities Practicum (1)
C: MUSC 4277. Supervised experience in group music activities at hospitals, special schools, sheltered workshops, or community health centers.
5257, 5267. Psychological Foundations of Music (3,3)
Nature and extent of scientific investigations into acoustics of music, human responses to music, learning theory, and basic research in music.
5287. Psychological Foundations of Music Practicum (1)
Lab provides opportunity to develop and carry out research in clinical setting.
5297. Music Therapy Practicum III (1)
Supervised practicum for music therapy majors. Application of music therapy procedures and techniques with individual clients.
5997. Clinical Internship (1)
Supervised internship. P: Music therapy major; completion of academic requirements for the degree. Placement in approved music therapy clinical training program with registered music therapist as director.

MUSC: PEDAGOGY

1627. Italian Lyric Diction for Singers (2) (F)
Basic understanding of standard lyric literature. Grammatical and phonetic analysis.
1637. French Lyric Diction for Singers (2) (S02)
Standard French lyric literature. Grammatical and phonetic analysis.
1647. German Lyric Diction for Singers (2) (S03)
Standard German lyric literature. Grammatical and phonetic analysis.
2125, 2135. Basic Keyboard Skills (1,1) (2125: F02; 2135: S03) Same as MUSC 2125, 2135 (Applied Music, Group)
2 sessions per week. Instruction in classes of 4 or more students. No fee. May count toward minor applied music requirement. P for 2135: MUSC 2125. Functional use of piano for music majors and minors whose primary performance medium is keyboard instrument.
3637. Voice Pedagogy (3)
Materials and techniques for teaching voice students at all levels of advancement.
3697. Introduction to String Teaching (3) Same as MUSC 3697 (Music Education)
P: MUSC 2115; 2305 or 2315. Principles of string teaching and their application to individual and group settings. Emphasis on elementary and secondary schools. Critical examination and evaluation of string instruction materials.
3707. Foundations and Principles of Piano Pedagogy (2) (F02)
Conceptual approach to teaching of piano. Emphasis on development of methodology and standards in piano teaching.
3717. Elementary Piano Pedagogy (2) (S03)
Piano literature and instruction. Emphasis on development of practical teaching strategies.
4644, 4647. Suzuki Pedagogy I, II (3,3)
C for 4644: MUSC 4646; P for 4647: MUSC 4644, 4646; C for 4647: MUSC 4648. Philosophy and principles of Suzuki approach to teaching and playing violin. Course scope limited to material presented in volumes I and II (for 4644) and volumes III and IV (for 4647) of Suzuki Violin School.
4646, 4648. Suzuki Observation I, II (1,1)
C for 4646: MUSC 4644; P for 4648: MUSC 4644, 4646; C for 4648: MUSC 4647. Two-semester sequence. Field observation of Suzuki approach to teaching and playing violin.
4649, 4650. Suzuki Observation III, IV (1,1)
2-semester sequence. P for 4649: MUSC 4648; C for 4649: MUSC 4654; P for 4650: MUSC 4649; C for 4650: MUSC 4656. Field observation of Suzuki approach to teaching and playing violin.
4654, 4656. Suzuki Pedagogy III, IV (3,3) (F,S)
P for 4654: MUSC 4647, 4648; C for 4656: MUSC 4650. Philosophy and principles of Suzuki approach to teaching and playing violin as presented in volumes V through VIII of Suzuki Violin School.
4657. Directed Study in Instrumental Pedagogy for Brass, Percussion, Strings, or Woodwinds (3)
Required of all brass, percussion, string, and woodwind performance majors. Conferences scheduled as needed with minimum of 1 hour per week. P: Acceptance in performance degree program; consent of instructor. Teaching materials and techniques for all levels of instruction in student’s area of specialization.
5647. Orchestral and String Pedagogy (3)
P: MUSC 3697 or consent of instructor. Methodology and materials for studio teaching. Orchestral organization, rehearsal, and repertoire, and their practical application. Minor repair.
5657. Organ Pedagogy (2)
P: Completion of 4 semesters of applied organ. Technical, artistic, and philosophical aspects of teaching organ at all levels of development. Survey of organ methods, appropriate graded repertoire in wide range of styles, and practice teaching.
5707. Seminar: Topics and Problems of Piano Pedagogy (2)
C: MUSC 5727. Emphasis on teaching the intermediate level pre-college student, including psychology of adolescent student, piano technique, keyboard skills, and working with transfer students.
5717. Advanced Piano Performance Problems (2)
C: MUSC 5727. Preschool music, the adult beginner, teaching in group settings, and nonmajor and secondary college piano.
5727. Piano Pedagogy: Observation and Student Teaching (2)
4 hours per week. May be repeated for credit. C: MUSC 5707 fall semester; MUSC 5717 spring semester. Supervised teaching and observation in the piano pedagogy program and/or through internship in an independent piano teaching studio.
5967. Choral Practicum (2) Same as MUSC 5967 (Sacred Music)
P: MUSC 5706, 5716; or consent of instructor. Student derives solutions to specific problems encountered in preparing chorus for performance.

MUSC: PERFORMANCE GROUPS, LARGE

1615. Varsity Choir (1) (FC:FA)
May be repeated for credit.
1625. Concert Choir (1) (FC:FA)
May be repeated for credit. Open to all students by audition only.
1635. University Chorale (1) (FC:FA)
May be repeated for credit. Open to all students.
1645. Men’s Glee Club (1) (FC:FA)
May be repeated for credit. Audition required.
1665. Women’s Glee Club (1) (FC:FA)
May be repeated for credit. Audition required.
1675. Chamber Singers (1) (FC:FA)
May be repeated for credit. Open to all students by audition only.
1705. Marching Band (2) (FC:FA)
May be repeated for credit. Open to all students. May not count toward large ensemble credit for music majors. Music majors taking more than 2 s.h. of MUSC 1706 or 1705 must sign a release form to be made available in the music office and in the SoM Undergraduate Handbook. The form will help clarify that hours above the required 2 s.h. of MUSC 1706 will not count as part of the Music Education degree plan at ECU, and that these extra hours may lead to additional hours on a student’s transcript before graduation.
1706. Marching Band Field Experience (1)
May be repeated for credit. Open to all students. Participation in marching band with teaching component emphasizing marching band pedagogy through student leadership positions. Music majors may count only 2 s.h. of Marching Band Field Expereince (MUSC 1706, 1 s.h.) for large ensemble credit. Music majors taking more than 2 s.h. of MUSC 1706 or 1705 must sign a release form to be made available in the music office and in the SoM Undergraduate Handbook. The form will help clarify that hours above the required 2 s.h. of MUSC 1706 will not count as part of the Music Education degree plan at ECU, and that these extra hours may lead to additional hours on a student’s transcript before graduation.
1715. Concert Band (1) (FC:FA)
May be repeated for credit. Open to all students.
1735. Wind Ensemble (1) (FC:FA)
May be repeated for credit. Open to all students by audition only.
1745. Symphony Orchestra (1) (FC:FA)
May be repeated for credit. Open to all students by audition only.
1765. Symphonic Band (1)
May be repeated for credit. Open to all students.
1775. Jazz Ensemble (1) (FC:FA)
May be repeated for credit. Open to all students by audition or consent of instructor.

MUSC: PERFORMANCE GROUPS, SMALL

1605. Opera Theatre (1) (FC:FA)
May be repeated for credit. 2 rehearsals per week.
1805. String Chamber Music (1)
2 rehearsals per week. May be repeated for credit.
1815. Woodwind Chamber Music (1)
2 rehearsals per week. May be repeated for credit.
1825. Percussion Chamber Music (1)
2 rehearsals per week. May be repeated for credit.
1835. Saxophone Chamber Music (1)
2 rehearsals per week. May be repeated for credit.
1845. Collegium Musicum (1)
2 rehearsals per week. May be repeated for credit.
1855. Jazz Chamber Music (1)
2 rehearsals per week. May be repeated for credit.
1865. Brass Chamber Music (1)
2 rehearsals per week. May be repeated for credit.
1875. Keyboard Chamber Music (1)
2 rehearsals per week. May be repeated for credit.
1885. Contemporary Chamber Music (1)
2 rehearsals per week. May be repeated for credit.
1895. Vocal Chamber Music (1)
2 rehearsals per week. May be repeated for credit.
2455, 2465, 3455, 3465, 4455. Accompanying (1 each) (2455, 3455:F; 2465, 3465: S) Same as MUSC 2455, 2465, 3455, 3465, 4455 (Applied Music, Group)
1 hour per week and supervised accompanying of singers and instrumentalists. Instruction in classes of 4 or more students. Applied music fee is $31 per semester hour credit. May count toward minor applied music requirement. May be repeated for credit. P for 2465, 3455, 3465, 4455: MUSC 2455. Skills, sight reading, transposition, and style required of accompanists.

MUSC: SACRED MUSIC

2476, 4476. Introduction to Service Playing I, II (1,1) (S)
1 lecture and 1 studio hour per week. P: 1 semester of applied organ or consent of instructor. Basic techniques and materials of service playing. Includes hymn playing, registration, and accompanying.
4417, 4437. Service Playing (2,2) Formerly MUSC 5517, 5527
Must be taken in sequence. P: MUSC 2476 or consent of instructor. Techniques and repertoire related to many facets of service playing, hymn playing, improvisation, accompanying, console conducting, and liturgical planning.
4525. History of Sacred Music and Worship (3)
P: MUSC 2416. Liturgical ritual and worship practices. Special emphasis on music and hymnody related to these practices from pre-Christian roots to modern day.
4526, 4527. Philosophy and Practice of Sacred Music I, II (2,2)
Must be taken in sequence. Explores philosophical and theological dimensions of music in worship; administration of a sacred music program; direction of handbell choirs; composition and arranging for the service; choral techniques and repertoire for children’s and youth choirs; and multicultural and non-traditional contemporary trends in sacred music.
4528. Sacred Music Internship (1) (F,S)
1 semester internship. P for organ majors: MUSC 2476; for vocal majors: MUSC 3156, 3166. Develop various skills under direct supervision of church supervisor and university advisor.
5667, 5677. Organ History, Literature, and Design (2,2) Same as MUSC 5667, 5677 (Music History and Literature)
Recommended to be taken in sequence. P: MUSC 2416. Historical survey of organ literature from earliest manuscripts through music of J. S. Bach in first term. From J. S. Bach to present in second term. Basic principles of organ construction and style. Emphasis on relationship between organ and its repertoire throughout centuries.
5967. Choral Practicum (3) Same as MUSC 5967 (Pedagogy)
P: MUSC 5706, 5716; or consent of instructor. Student derives solutions to specific problems encountered in preparing chorus for performance.

MUSC: THEORY COMPOSITION

1156, 1166. Basic Musicianship (3,3) (F,S,SS)
P for 1166: MUSC 1156. Basic concepts of scales, melody, rhythm, form, and notation. Emphasis on functional harmony and analysis.
1176, 1186. Basic Musicianship Laboratory (1,1) (F,S,SS)
2 1-hour sessions per week. P for 1186: MUSC 1176; C for 1186: MUSC 1166. Aural comprehension, sight singing, performance, and conducting skills.
1326, 1336. Composition (1,1)
Beginning study. P/C: MUSC 1156, 1176.
2156, 2166. Basic Musicianship (3,3)
P for 2156: MUSC 1166; P for 2166: MUSC 2156. Selected Baroque and nineteenth- and twentieth-century styles and genres. Emphasis on analysis, chromatic functional harmony, and twentieth century compositional techniques.
2176, 2186. Basic Musicianship Laboratory (1,1)
2 1-hour sessions per week. P for 2176: MUSC 1186; C for 2176: MUSC 2156; P for 2186: MUSC 2176; C for 2186: MUSC 2166. Continued development of skills in aural comprehension, sight singing, performance, and conducting.
2326, 2336. Composition (2,2)
Weekly seminar plus conference. P: MUSC 1336 or consent of instructor. Intermediate study.
3176. Basic Musicianship V (2) (WI)
P: MUSC 2166, 2186. Analytical study of complete works for large ensembles. Applies analysis to practical situations of performance and conducting.
3326, 3336. Composition (2,2)
Weekly seminar plus conference. P: MUSC 2336 or consent of instructor. Advanced study.
3366, 3386. Electronic Music Composition (2,2)
P: MUSC 2326 or consent of instructor. Beginning and intermediate composition in electronic idiom. Classical studio technique (3366). Electronic music synthesis on Moog Series III Synthesizer (3386).
4326, 4336. Composition (3,3)
May be repeated for credit. Weekly seminar and conference. P: MUSC 3336 or consent of instructor. Advanced study.
4327. Counterpoint (3) (F) Formerly MUSC 5316
Counterpoint from sixteenth to twentieth century. Emphasis on eighteenth-century genres, through listening, analysis, and written assignments.
4328. Language of Post-tonal Music (3) (WI) (S-EY) Formerly MUSC 5326
Materials and techniques used by composers since beginning of twentieth century. Stylistic writing and analysis of works by selected composers of century.
4366, 4376. Advanced Composition in Electronic Media (3,3)
P: MUSC 3386 or consent of instructor. Emphasis on larger, extended forms, tape and instrumental combination, real-time performance, and intermedia.
4506. Directed Study in Music Theory (2) (F,S,SS)
Required of all undergraduate theory-composition majors who specialize in theory. Conferences scheduled as needed with minimum of 1 hour meeting per week. May be repeated for maximum of 4 s.h. P: MUSC 2166.
4536. Introduction to Schenkerian Analysis (3) (S-OY)
P: MUSC 2166 or consent of instructor. Tonal music using graphic analytical techniques of Heinrich Schenker. Includes contemporary extensions of Schenker approach.
5336. Advanced Orchestration (2)
Scoring for orchestra and symphonic band. Techniques from Classic period through contemporary idioms.
5346. Modern Instrumental Arranging (2)
P: MUSC 3176 or consent of instructor. Develop arranging skills and techniques as applied to instrumental music (e.g., stage band, marching band, symphonic band, and orchestra).
5366. Special Studies in Music Theory (3)
May be repeated for credit with consent of dept chair. P: MUSC 2166 or graduate standing in MUSC or consent of instructor. Subject matter determined by needs and interests.

MUSC: COURSES FOR NON-MUSIC MAJORS

1008. Music Theory for Non-music Majors (3) (FC:FA)
Not open to MUSC majors. P: Ability to read music or consent of instructor. Various elements of music theory. Notation, intervals, scales, rhythm, harmony, and form.
1018, 1028. Music Reading and Fundamentals for Non-music Majors (2,2) (FC:FA)
Not open to MUSC majors. P for 1028: MUSC 1018. Music reading skills and fundamentals.
1108, 1118. Non-music Major Group Voice (1,1) (FC:FA)
2 classroom hours per week. P for 1118: MUSC 1108. Fundamentals of voice production and beginning vocal literature. Applied music group fee is $35 per semester hour credit.
1208, 1218. Non-music Major Group Piano (1,1) (FC:FA)
2 classroom hours per week. P for 1218: MUSC 1208 or consent of instructor. Develop basic playing ability. Note reading, rhythm, technique, and repertoire. Applied music group fee is $35 per semester hour credit.
1308, 1318. Non-music Major Group Guitar (1,1) (FC:FA)
2 classroom hours per week. P for 1318: MUSC 1308 or consent of instructor. Fundamentals of technique and notation on guitar. Emphasis on basic right-hand techniques and their application to solo performance. Applied music group fee is $35 per semester hour credit.
2207. The Enjoyment of Music (3) (F,S,SS) (FC:FA)
Not open to MUSC majors. May not be taken by students who have credit for MUSC 2208. Basic materials of music and their utilization in understanding and enjoyment of music of different styles and periods.
2208. Music Appreciation (2) (F,S,SS) (FC:FA)
Not open to MUSC majors. May not be taken by students who have credit for MUSC 2207. Basic materials of music and their utilization in understanding and enjoyment of music of different styles and periods. Lectures and live performances. Emphasis on aural awareness development.
2209. The Musical Experience (3)
Non-specialist overview of the resources, genres, and cultural outlook of musical traditions worldwide, including vernacular (folk and indigenous), popular, and cultivated (i.e., “classical”) musics. Emphasizes development of musical and multicultural awareness through mastery of basic terminology, stylistic concepts, and critical listening skills.
2225. Introduction to Early Music in the West (3) (FC:FA)
Survey of materials, forms, genres, and significant issues of music in the Medieval and Renaissance periods. Non-technical format emphasizing basic terminology, stylistic concepts, and place of music in intellectual, cultural, and religious context of time. Development of critical thinking and listening skills.
2226. Introduction to Popular Music Styles in America (3) (FC:FA)
Identifies stylistic strands of American popular music from ante-bellum New Orleans to present multifarious musical spectrum. Explores musical and cultural significance. Develop basic terminology, tracing important formative influences such as blues, ragtime, jazz, Tin Pan Alley, Broadway, and rock. Fosters development of cultural and historical awareness through critical listening.
2227. Introduction to American Music from Colonial Times to the Present (3) (FC:FA)
Overview of rich palette of music produced and consumed in US in historic times, from the Bay Psalm Book to diverse styles of twentieth century. Focuses on cultivated and vernacular traditions, including band music, gospel, folk and country styles, popular music, and European-influenced trends. Develop cultural and historical awareness through critical listening.
2229. Introduction to Western Art Music (3) (FC:FA)
Nonspecialist overview of musical resources, genres, and historical styles of European music, illustrated through masterworks by great composers of previous historical eras through the modern period. Emphasizes development of cultural awareness through mastery of basic terminology, stylistic and historical concepts, and critical-listening skills.
2248. Music of the World’s Peoples (2) (F,S,SS) (FC:FA)
Broader comprehension and appreciation of non- Western music. Increased awareness of music and musical thought of other cultures. Basic survey of music of non-Western cultures from Asia, Africa, the Near East, the Pacific, and South America.
2257. Jazz Appreciation (3) (F,S,SS) (FC:FA)
May not be taken by students who have credit for MUSC 2258. Basic materials of jazz music and their utilization in understanding and enjoyment of jazz music of different styles and periods.
2258. History of Jazz Music (2) (F,S,SS) (FC:FA)
May not be taken by students who have credit for MUSC 2257. May count toward MUSC major electives. Jazz from its origin to present.
2268. Music of Latin America (2) (FC:FA)
Not open to MUSC majors. Popular and classical music of Latin America. Effect of Latin-American historical events on its music, basic musical concepts, and vocabulary. Emphasis on aural awareness.
3018. Introduction to Basic Music Skills for Elementary School Teachers (3) (F,S,SS) (FC:FA)
Skills and understanding necessary for teaching music. Applied music group fee is $35 per semester hour credit.
3048. Music for Exceptional Children (2) (F,S,SS) (FC:FA)
May count toward MUSC major electives. Emphasis on materials, procedures, and activities. Applied music group fee is $35 per semester hour credit.
3058. Music for the Preschool Child (2)
May count toward MUSC major electives. P: MUSC 3018 or consent of instructor. Materials and methods for teaching music to children from birth to 6 years of age.
4228. Arts Marketing (3)
May count toward MUSC major electives. Key concepts, background, public relations strategies, and arts-specific marketing solutions for teachers, sacred musicians, and community-sponsored arts program directors to promote music, theatre, and arts programs effectively.
4277. Music for Group Activities (2) (F) Same as MUSC 4277 (Music Therapy)
Open to recreation and leisure studies and allied health majors. C: MUSC 4287. Organization and development of social and recreational music activities. Emphasis on therapeutic function.
MUSC Banked Courses
1405, 1425. Woodwind Group (1,1)
1655. Women’s Chorus (1)
1755. Symphony Orchestra Laboratory (0)
2008. Theatre Score Analysis (3)
2218. Orchestral Music (2)
2228. Music of the Theatre (2)
2238. Contemporary Music (2)
2305. String Group (1)
2445. Intermediate Percussion Group (1)
2909. Introduction to Music Business (3)
3028. Music Education in Elementary Grades (2)
3038. Music Education in Intermediate Grades (2)
3205. Voice Fundamentals (1)
3647. Voice Pedagogy (2)
3909. Seminar in Music Industry (1)
4306. Advanced Theory (2)
4465. Accompanying (1)
4909. Selected Topics in Music Business (2)
4993. Cooperative Internship in Music Business (3)
4996. Cooperative Internship in Music Business (6)
5446. American Music (2)
5496. Electronic Music (2)
5537. Music for Children and Youth (2)
5547. Hymnology (2)
5567. History of Liturgies (2)
5587. Introduction to Handbells (1)