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Undergraduate Catalog 2008-09


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Undergraduate Courses


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BIME: Biomedical Engineering

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3000. Foundations of Biomedical Engineering (3) (F)
3 lecture hours per week. P: Consent of instructor. Application of fundamental engineering skills to solve problems in medicine and biology. Introduces students to a wide range of state-of-the-art applications in biomedical engineering and promotes understanding of interdisciplinary nature of the field. Topics covered include medical instrumentation and design, biomechanics, biomaterials, mass transport, application of computers in medicine, artificial implants, medical imaging, and medical ethics.
4030. Biomechanics and Materials (4) (F)
4 lecture hours per week. P: CHEM 2750, 2753; ENGR 3004, 3024. Concepts of statics, dynamics, mechanics of materials, and fluid mechanics applied to biological systems. Characterization of biological materials, including time-dependent properties.
4040. Physiological Systems and Modeling for Engineering (3) (F)
3 lecture hours per week. P: BIME 3000. Introduction to physiology, emphasizing concepts and systems for engineering, including cell signaling, body signaling and control systems. Quantitative introduction to cardiovascular and renal systems. Example of brain-machine interfaces. Survey of other physiological systems.
4200. Biomedical Instrumentation (4) (F)
3 lecture and 2 lab hours per week. P: BIME 4040; ENGR 3050. Instrumentation and techniques used in acquisition, processing, and presentation of biomedical signals: transducers, sensors, Fourier analysis, flow measurement, medical imaging, biosensors, amplifiers, bridge circuits, and measurement of physical parameters and electrophysiological signals.

BIOE: Bioprocess Engineering

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3000. Bioprocess Engineering Systems (3) (S)
2 lecture and 3 lab hours per week. P: BIOL 2110; CHEM 2650, 2651; consent of instructor. Engineering concepts for biological conversion of raw materials to pharmaceuticals, biopharmaceuticals, fuels, biological products, and chemicals. Includes enzyme, bioreaction and cellular growth kinetics, bioreactor stoichiometry, analytical characterization of biological products, and design, analysis, selection, scale up, and control of bioreactors and fermenters.
4000. Bioprocess Validation and Quality Engineering (4) (F)
4 lecture hours per week. P: MATH 3307; consent of instructor. Overview of bioprocess validation and quality control systems that ensure safe products, reduce the risk of adverse reactions, and avoid recalls. Emphasizes cost effectiveness and level of validation required for different phases of development, license application, and process improvements. Also covers design of experiments in bioprocess applications.
4010. Bioprocess Separation Engineering (3) (F)
2 lecture and 3 lab hours per week. P: BIOE 3000. Unit operations used in biological processing useful in product isolation and purification. Solid-liquid separation, filtration, centrifugation, cell disruption, isolation, purification, chromatography and drying.
4020. Bioprocess Plant Design, Simulation and Analysis (3) (S)
3 lecture hours per week. P: BIOE 4010; MATH 3307. Engineering principles for design of systems for processing biological materials into primary and secondary products and study of techniques for mathematically describing biological systems. Covers delivery scheduling, storage requirements, economic analysis, process control and instrumentation of bioprocess plants.

BIOL: Biology

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1010. Biodiversity of Coastal North Carolina (3) (F,S)
Survey of major terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems from the coastal plain to the continental shelf, with emphasis on their flora and fauna. Self-guided coastal plain trip required to one of several nature centers or museums at student’s expense.
1030. Plants and Human Affairs (3) (F,S) (FC:SC)
May not count toward BIOL major or minor. BIOL 1051 may be taken as a lab complement. Biology of plants and their related organisms and importance throughout history.
1050. General Biology (3) (F,S,SS) (FC:SC)
May not count toward BIOL major or minor. Molecular basis of biology, bioenergetics, control systems, reproduction and development, genetics, diversity, evolution, communication, and behavior ecosystems.
1051. General Biology Laboratory (1) (F,S,SS) (FC:SC)
1 3-hour lab per week. May not count toward BIOL major or minor. C: BIOL 1030 or 1050. Practical applications of biological principles.
1060. Environmental Biology (4) (F,S,SS) (FC:SC)
May not count toward BIOL major or minor. Interrelationships of organisms with each other and with their environment and human factors. Basic ecological problems, principles, and solutions.
1061. Environmental Biology Laboratory (1) (F,S) (FC:SC)
1 3-hour lab or field excursion per week. May not count toward BIOL major or minor. Optional lab or field course offered to provide a more in-depth look at habitats.
1080, 1081. General Zoology (5,0) (F) (FC:SC)
4 lectures and 1 3-hour lab per week. Biology of major animal phyla. Emphasis on phylogeny, morphology, and physiology.
1100, 1101. Principles of Biology and Laboratory I (3,1) (F,S,SS) (FC:SC)
3 lecture and 3 lab hours per week. P/C for 1101: BIOL 1100. Molecular biology, bioenergetics, cellular structure, and physiology. Molecular basis of inheritance and control of gene expression.
1200, 1201. Principles of Biology and Laboratory II (3,1) (F,S,SS) (FC:SC)
3 lecture and 3 lab hours per week. P/C for 1201: BIOL 1200. Five living kingdoms and diversity that prevails in natural systems. Principles of evolution, ecology, and behavior, particularly in context of diversity.
2015. Introduction to Biological Anthropology (3) (WI*) (F,S) (FC:SC)
Same as ANTH 2015 May count toward foundations curriculum science requirement for all except ANTH majors. May not count toward foundations curriculum social sciences requirement. RP: BIOL course. Evolutionary theory, human evolution, and formation of human variability, adaptation, and genetics. Relationships among primates.
2016. Biological Anthropology Laboratory (1) (F,S) (FC:SC)
Same as ANTH 2016 May count toward foundations curriculum science requirement for all except ANTH majors. May not count toward foundations curriculum social sciences requirement. C: BIOL 2015. Human and population genetics, anthropometry, anthroposcopy, dermatoglyphics, blood pressure, blood typing, osteometry, primate taxonomy, and human evolution.
2100, 2101. Basic Laboratory Methods for Biotechnology (3,0) (F,SS)
Formerly BIOL 3100, 3101 1 lecture and 4 laboratory hours per week. P: BIOL 1100, 1101; MATH 1065, 1 semester of CHEM with lab. Practical basic training in laboratory techniques generally applicable to molecular and cell biology, genetics, biochemistry, microbiology and forensics.
2110, 2111. Fundamentals of Microbiology and Laboratory (3,1) (F,S)
3 lectures and 2 2-hour labs per week. May not count toward BIOL major or minor. P for 2110: 7 s.h. in CHEM; RP for 2110; BIOL 1050, 1051 or 1100, 1101. P/C for 2111: BIOL 2110. General study of microorganisms and their importance to humans. Emphasis on fundamental life processes, including a brief introduction to epidemiology and immunology
2130. Survey of Human Physiology and Anatomy (4) (F,S,SS) (FC:SC)
A maximum of 4 s.h. of 2000-level human physiology and anatomy coursework may count toward the BIOL major or minor. P: BIOL 1050, 1051; or 1100, 1101. Functional anatomy and normal physiology of human organ systems.
2131. Survey of Human Physiology and Anatomy Laboratory (1) (F,S,SS) (FC:SC)
3 lab hours per week. May not count toward BIOL major or minor. P/C: BIOL 2130. Principles and review of anatomy of human organ systems.
2140, 2150. Human Physiology and Anatomy (3,3)
Two-semester integrated course. A maximum of 4 s.h. of 2000-level human physiology and anatomy coursework may count toward the BIOL major or minor. P: 1 CHEM course; P for 2150: BIOL 2140; C for 2140: BIOL 2141; C for 2150: BIOL 2151. Normal physiology and functional anatomy of human organ systems.
2141, 2151. Human Physiology and Anatomy Laboratory(1,1)
3 lab hours per week. Two-semester integrated labs. A maximum of 4 s.h. of 2000-level human physiology and anatomy coursework may count toward the BIOL major or minor. P for 2151: BIOL 2141; C for 2141: BIOL 2140; C for 2151: BIOL 2150. Application of anatomical and physiological concepts.
2250. Ecology (3) (F,S,SS)
P: BIOL 1100, 1101, 1200, 1201. Structure and function of ecosystems. Relationships of environmental factors operating in different habitats to floral and faunal composition of each community.
2251. Ecology Laboratory (1) (F,S,SS)
3 lab hours per week. P: BIOL 1100, 1101, 1200, 1201; C: BIOL 2250. Field experiences and lab methods used to determine structure and function of ecosystems.
2300. Principles of Genetics (3) (F,S,SS)
P: 2 BIOL courses. Emphasis on modern genetics and its application.
2800. Biological Instruction (2) (F, S)
1 lecture and 3 lab hours per week. Open to biology or biochemistry majors by invitation only. P: BIOL 1100, 1101, 1200, 1201; or consent of instructor. Instruction and supervised experience in methods and practice of teaching introductory biology.
3070, 3071. Survey of Plants and Fungi (4,0)
P: 3 s.h. of science with a lab. Plants and fungi with emphasis on evolutionary patterns in structure, reproduction, and ecological function.
3150. Plant Biology (3) (S)
P: 2000 - level BIOL course or consent of instructor. Plant structure, function and diversity, including physiology, metabolism, reproduction, genetics, evolution, ecology and human use.
3220, 3221. Microbiology (4,0) (F)
3 lectures and 2 2-hour labs per week. P: BIOL 1200, 1201; organic CHEM course. Structure, physiology, disease, environmental relationships, and molecular biology of microbes.
3230, 3231. Field Botany (4,0) (F,S,SS)
P: 3 s.h. of general BIOL with a lab. Plant identification and interactions of plants with their chemical, physical, and living environments. Emphasis on recognition of common vascular elements of local flora and major plant communities of coastal NC.
3240, 3241. Field Zoology (4,0) (F)
P: BIOL 1060 or 2250. Methods and principles in zoological field study. Focus on local NC vertebrate fauna.
3310, 3311. Cellular Physiology (4,0) (F,S,SS)
3 lectures and 1 3-hour lab per week. P: Organic chemistry or biochemistry course. Structure and function of cells. Emphasis on physico-chemical aspects. Current status of major problems such as gene function, photosynthesis, contraction, active transport, and nerve cell function.
3320. Principles of Animal Physiology (3) (F,S,SS)
P: 2000-level organic chemistry or biochemistry course. Introduces concepts of animal physiology.
3321. Principles of Animal Physiology Laboratory (1) (F,S,SS)
C: BIOL 3320. Lab to accompany BIOL 3320.
3400, 3401. Biological Field Studies of the Coastal Plain (3,0)
2 lecture and 3 lab hours per week. P: 2 courses in BIOL or GEOL or consent of instructor. Current status and change initiated by nature and man. Field trips and field projects important.
3550. Biology Honors (1) (WI) (F,S,SS)
Conferences with staff as needed. May be repeated once for a maximum of 2 s.h. Student taking this course will normally be expected to take BIOL 4550. P: Faculty invitation. Seminar and research.
3620. Biological Evolution (3) (F)
P: MATH 1065 or equivalent; BIOL 2300 or consent of instructor. Evolution from a biological standpoint. Relationships of evolutionary theory and reciprocal impact on ecology, genetics, diversity, and biogeography. Speciation, selection and populations.
3621. Biological Evolution Laboratory (1) (F)
C: BIOL 3620. 3 lab hours per week. Hands-on experience with computer-based molecular evolutionary analyses, student discussions and presentations of course material.
3660. Introduction to Marine Biology (3) (F,S,SS)
Coastal field trip, at student’s expense, required. P/C: BIOL 2250, 2251. Ocean habitats and marine plants and animals that comprise various marine ecosystems.
3661. Introduction to Marine Biology Laboratory (1) (F,S)
3 lab hours per week. C: BIOL 3660. Exercises examine physical and chemical properties of ocean waters and representative marine organisms.
3740, 3741. Animal Behavior (4,0) (F) (WI*)
3 lecture and 2 discussion hours per week. P: BIOL 1100, 1200; RP: BIOL 2250. Introduction to animal behavior with emphasis on experimental approaches. Topics include evolution and development of behavior, neural mechanisms, instinct, communication, foraging and reproductive behavior, and sociobiology.
4040. Human Genetics (3)
P: BIOL 2300. Concepts of Mendelian and molecular genetics as applied to inheritance of human genetic disorders.
4050, 4051. Comparative Anatomy (4,0) (F)
2 lectures and 2 3-hour labs per week. P: 6 s.h. in BIOL. Structure and relationship of vertebrate animals. Emphasis on phylogeny of organ systems.
4060, 4061. Embryology (4,0)
3 lectures and 1 3-hour lab per week. P: BIOL 2300. Early developmental processes of anatomical and physiological significance. Emphasis on developmental stages of frog, chick, and mammalian embryos.
4071. Human Gross Anatomy (4)
3 conference/demonstration and 3 lab hours per week. May not count toward foundations curriculum science requirement. P: BIOL 4050, 4051; or consent of instructor. Dissection-based regional study of human cadaver.
4150. Pestilence, Politics and Conquest (3) (S)
P: BIOL 1050 or 1100 or consent of instructor. Pathology of infectious diseases and the impact that they had, or may have, on world events, past, present and future.
4170. Immunology I (3) (F)
P: BIOL 2300 or consent of instructor. Structure, function, and genetic organization of body’s defense system. Interactions of immunocompetent cells and their role in infection, disease, and autoimmunity.
4200, 4201. Population and Community Ecology (4,0) (4200:WI) (S)
P: BIOL 2250, 2251, 2300; CHEM 1150, 1151; RP: CHEM 1160, 1161; MATH 2121 or statistics course. Organization of populations and communities. Emphasis on interactions among organisms and their environments and how these structure populations and communities.
4210. Phylogenetic Theory (3) (F)
P: BIOL 2250, 2251, 2300. Theory and practice of modern phylogenetic methods. Topics include basic evolutionary concepts, reconstructing evolutionary relationships using molecular and other data, and statistical methods for assessing reliability of phylogenetic analyses. Emphasis on hands-on experience with phylogenetic computer programs.
4220. Microbes and Immunity (3) (S,SS)
P: BIOL 2110, 2111; or 3220, 3221. Interaction of pathogenic microbes such as bacteria, viruses, fungi, and parasites with human defense system.
4230. Concepts in Cell Biology (3) (S)
P: BIOL 3310. Basic concepts of cell biology, including control of gene expression, DNA repair, programmed cell death, cell communication.
4240. Genome Evolution (3) (S)
P: BIOL 2300 or consent of instructor. Recent advances in comparative genomics, focusing on the evolution of more complex eukaryotic genomes. Course includes lectures and seminar discussions of current research publications.
4300, 4301. Ecosystem Ecology (4,0) (WI) (F)
P: BIOL 2250, 2251. In-depth examination of ecosystem processes. Primary production, decomposition, and nutrient cycling as influenced by biotic and environmental controls in terrestrial, aquatic, and wetland ecosystems.
4320. Ecological Responses to Global Climate Change (3) (S)
P: BIOL 2250, 2251. Theory and practical examination of effects of climate change. Predicted and present environmental influences on ecosystems, communities, populations and organisms.
4400. Terrestrial Field Ecology (4) (SS)
2 lecture and 6 lab or fieldwork hours per week. Field and lab work at an off-campus research site may involve additional costs. P: 1 statistics course; BIOL 2250, 2251; consent of instructor (by application). Research skills and techniques used by ecologists in freshwater and terrestrial systems in preparation for ecological research at graduate level.
4480, 4481. Cytology (2,2) (F)
Formerly BIOL 5480, 5481 2 lectures and 2 2-hour labs per week. P: BIOL 1100, 2300, 3310. Function and structural components of eukaryotic cells.
4500. Marine Field Ecology (4) (SS)
2 lecture and 6 lab and/or fieldwork hours per week at an off-campus research site or field station. May involve additional costs. P: BIOL 3660, 3661; a statistic course; consent of instructor (by application). Research skills and techniques used by marine ecologists in preparation for marine and oceanographic research at graduate level.
4504, 4514. Research Problems in Biology (2,2) (WI, WI) (F,S,SS)
4 hours of research-related work per week. May be repeated for maximum of 4 s.h. P: Consent of instructor. Designed to meet individual needs and interests of well-qualified undergraduate students.
4550. Biology Honors (2) (WI) (F,S,SS)
Conferences with staff as needed. May be repeated for maximum of 4 s.h. P: Faculty invitation. Seminar and research.
4650. Biology of Cancer (3) (S)
P: BIOL 2300, 3310; or consent of instructor. Comprehensive study of the molecular basis of cancer with emphasis on the development and treatment of specific cancers.
4800. Topics in Biology (3)
May be repeated once with a change of topic. P: BIOL 2300 or 2250 or consent of instructor. Special topics of contemporary interest.
5070, 5071. Ornithology (4,0)
3 lecture hours and 1 3-hour lab per week. Field trips to observe native birds in natural surroundings required. P: 8 s.h. in BIOL. Survey of birds of the world. Emphasis on ecology, evolution, and behavior: adaptive radiation, migration, flight mechanics, morphology, taxonomy, bird song, reproduction, population biology, and conservation of birds.
5150, 5151. Herpetology (4,0)
3 lectures and 1 3-hour lab per week. P: 8 s.h. in BIOL. Taxonomy, anatomy, physiology, distribution, phylogeny, natural history, and ecology of reptiles and amphibians of the world. Emphasis on species of NC and Atlantic Coastal Plain.
5200, 5201. Invertebrate Zoology (4,0)
3 lectures and 1 3-hour lab per week. P: 6 s.h. in BIOL. General comparative anatomical and physiological aspects of invertebrate groups. Emphasis on similarities, differences, and evolution.
5220, 5221. Limnology (4,0)
3 lectures and 1 3-hour lab per week. P: BIOL 2250, 2251; or consent of instructor. Physical, chemical, and biological factors of inland waters and their influence on aquatic organisms.
5230, 5231. Phycology (4,0)
3 lectures and 1 3-hour lab per week. P: BIOL 1200, 1201. Systematic survey of algae. Emphasis on their role in aquatic ecosystems. Lab employs techniques for studying algae and use of systematic keys.
5260, 5261. Microbial Ecology (4,0)
3 lectures and 2 2-hour labs per week. P: BIOL 2250, 2251, 3220, 3221; or consent of instructor. Interactions between microorganisms and their physical, chemical, and biological environment. Microbial involvement in energy flow, nutrient cycling, and intra/inter-specific interactions. Introduces statistical analyses of biological and ecological data.
5270. Marine Community Ecology (3)
P: BIOL 2250, 2251; or consent of instructor. Advanced examination of ecology of marine and brackish water communities based on principles of population biology and community ecology. Emphasis on current hypotheses concerning the processes structuring major communities.
5351. Biological Processes and the Chemistry of Natural Water (2)
6 lab hours per week. P: BIOL 2250, 2251; 2 CHEM courses; or consent of instructor. Interactions of water quality and biological processes in aquatic ecosystems.
5370. Biological Effects of Radiation (3)
Same as RONC 5370 P: BIOL 1100, 1101, 1200, 1201; or consent of instructor. Biological effects resulting from interactions of radiation and matter for scientifically and technically-oriented students.
5400. Wetland Ecology and Management (3)
P: BIOL 2250, 2251; or consent of instructor. Marshes, swamps, bogs, fens, and other intermittently flooded ecosystems. Emphasis on classification, ecosystem processes, structure, and management of freshwater and saltwater wetlands.
5401. Wetland Ecology Laboratory (1)
P: BIOL 2250, 2251; C: BIOL 5400. Application of methods to measure ecological properties, assess the functioning, identify plant communities, and understand landscape interaction of wetland ecosystems.
5450, 5451. Histology (4,0)
2 lectures and 2 2-hour labs per week. P: 4 BIOL courses. Organization of cells, tissues, and organs at microscopic level.
5480, 5481. Cytology (2,2)
2 lectures and 2 2-hour labs per week. P: BIOL 1100, 2300, 3310. Function and structural components of eukaryotic cells.
5510, 5511. Transmission Electron Microscopy (4,0)
2 lecture and 6 lab hours per week. P for undergraduate students: Senior standing as BIOL major or consent of instructor. Introduces theory, design, and use of transmission electron microscope and to preparation of biological materials for its use.
5520, 5521. Scanning Electron Microscopy and X-Ray Analysis (2,0)
1 lecture and 4 lab hours per week. P for undergraduate students: Senior standing as a BIOL major or consent of instructor. Introduction to theory and techniques of scanning electron microscopy and X-Ray analysis and preparation of materials for both.
5550, 5551. Ichthyology (4,0)
2 lectures and 2 3-hour labs per week. Evolution and biology of major fish groups of the world. Emphasis on NC species.
5600, 5601. Fisheries Techniques (3,0)
For biology majors interested in marine biology. Field trips and field studies are integral. 2 lectures and 1 3-hour lab or field excursion per week. P: BIOL 2250, 2251; or equivalent. Practical training in field and lab experimental methods in fisheries techniques.
5630, 5631. Comparative Animal Physiology (4,0)
3 lectures and 1 3-hour lab per week. P: 2 BIOL and 2 organic CHEM courses. Principles of function of organ systems of major groups of animals. Nutrition, digestion, respiration, skin and temperature control, blood and circulatory systems, excretion, the muscular-skeletal system, nervous coordination, and endocrine system.
5640, 5641. Entomology (4,0)
3 lectures and 1 3-hour lab per week. P: 12 s.h. BIOL. General anatomy, physiology, ecology, and classification of insects.
5680. Current Topics in Coastal Biology (3)
P: Consent of instructor. Seminar on environmental issues in coastal biology presented by directed reading, lecture, and discussion.
5730, 5731. Animal Physiological Ecology (4,0)
3 lectures and 1 3-hour lab per week. P: BIOL 2250, 2251; 3310, 3311 or 3320, 3321 or 5800, 5821; or consent of instructor. Physiological adjustments and responses of animals to their environment. Considers mechanisms involved, and invertebrate, vertebrate, aquatic, and terrestrial animals.
5740, 5741. Behavioral Ecology (4,0)
3 lecture and 2 discussion hours per week. P: BIOL 4200, 4201. Animal behavior from an evolutionary perspective. Readings from current scientific literature and weekly discussions.
5750, 5751. Introduction to Regional Field Ecology (2,0)
(5750:WI) For science and environmental studies teachers. 20 hours of lecture and 32 hours of field trips. May not count toward MS in BIOL or molecular biology/biotechnology. Major regional ecosystems.
5800. Principles of Biochemistry I (3)
3 lecture hours per week. P: BIOL 3310, 3311; or consent of instructor; CHEM 2760, 2763. Intermediary metabolism, metabolic processes, and metabolic regulation of major groups of compounds in living cells.
5810. Principles of Biochemistry II (3)
May be taken before BIOL 5800. P: BIOL 3310, 3311; or consent of instructor; CHEM 2760, 2763. Protein biochemistry. Structure and function of amino acids and proteins, including protein biosynthesis and kinetics. Structures illustrated using computer-modeling techniques.
5821. Principles of Biochemistry Laboratory (1)
Required for biochemistry majors; recommended for biology majors. P/C for undergraduate students: BIOL 5800 or 5810. General biochemistry lab designed to complement BIOL 5800, 5810.
5870. Molecular Biology of the Gene (3)
P: BIOL 2300. Genetics of prokaryotic and eukaryotic organisms at molecular level. Structure and function of nucleic acids; replication, recombination, and repair; control of gene expression; and other related topics.
5890. Virology (3)
P: BIOL 2100, 2101; or 5870; 3220, 3221. Plant, animal, and bacterial viruses. Emphasis on distinctive features of viruses as related to parasitism, disease, and basic research.
5900, 5901. Biotechniques and Laboratory (2,3)
2 1-hour lectures and 2 4-hour labs per week. P: BIOL 2100, 2101, 5870; consent of instructor; RP: BIOL 5810, 5821; C for 5901: BIOL 5900. Theory and practice of modern genetic engineering technology. Topics include DNA purification, electrophoresis, restriction mapping, use of DNA modifying enzymes, basic cloning in plasmid vectors, and strain construction by conjugation and transduction.
5930, 5931. Microcomputer Applications in Molecular Biology (2,0)
1 lecture and 1 3-hour lab per week. P: BIOL 3310, 3311; or 5810, 5821; or 5870. Techniques for analysis of biological characteristics of nucleic acid and protein molecules using BASIC with microcomputers.
5950, 5951. Taxonomy of Vascular Plants (4,0)
1 2-hour lecture and 1 4-hour lab per week. P: 12 s.h. BIOL or consent of instructor; RP: BIOL 2250, 2251. Plant importance, identification, classification, and evolution as well as how plants interact with living and nonliving environments. Field experiences emphasize major communities and dominant floral elements of coastal NC.
5995. Internship (1)
3 hours per week. May be repeated once for a maximum of 2 s.h. P: Consent of instructor. Lab experiences under direct supervision of a member of biology faculty.
BIOL Banked Courses
1070, 1071. General Botany (5,0)
2260. Cell and Developmental Biology (3)
2261. Cell and Developmental Biology Laboratory (1)
3301. Principles of Genetics Laboratory (1)
4720. Principles of Biology II (2)
4999. Senior Topics (1)
5000, 5001. Radio Tracer Techniques in Biology (3,0)
5020, 5021. Animal Parasitology (4,0)
5040, 5041. Mycology (4,0)
5050. Applied Ecology (3)
5080, 5081. Plant Anatomy and Morphology (4,0)
5110, 5111. Plant Growth and Development (4,0)
5678. Biology of Aging (3)
5850, 5851. Biometry (3,0)
5860, 5861. Biological Applications of Digital Computers (3,0)
5880, 5881. Microbial Physiology (4,0)
5910, 5911. Vascular Plant Systematics (4,0)
5920, 5921. Vertebrate Systematics (4,0)

BIOS: Biostatistics

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1500. Introduction to Biostatistics (3) (F,S)
P: MATH 1065 with a grade of C or better or equivalent or consent of instructor. Application of statistics to health field. Topics include organization and display of different types of data, elementary probability, and statistical inference for one- and two-sample problems.
4900. Biostatistics Honors (3)
P: Consent of instructor. Special topics appropriate to the needs of the student, arranged with the approval of the instructor.
5010. Epidemiology for Health Professionals (3)
P: BIOS 1500 or consent of instructor. Distribution of disease in human populations and factors that influence this distribution. Emphasis on leading causes of death, evaluating health research, and utilizing epidemiologic methods.

BITE: Business and Information Technologies Education

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1500, Electronic Information Processing I (3) (F,S,SS)
3 lecture hours per week. Beginning course in electronic touch keyboarding and use of information processing systems to produce text documents via a computerized delivery system.
2000. Introduction to Computer Literacy (1) (F,S, SS)
May count toward teacher education degrees. May not count toward BS in nursing or BS degree programs in Dept. of Technology Systems. Knowledge and skills needed to satisfy basic technology competencies required to support and enhance professional productivity, information access, collaboration, and communication among educators, word processing, spreadsheets, presentations, and database.
2112. Introduction to Information Processing Technology (3) (F,S,SS)
Use of various data processing systems for business applications. Functional and operational characteristics of data processing systems.
2123. Early Experiences for the Prospective Teacher (1) (F,S)
For prospective teachers. Minimum of 16 hours of directed observations and planned participation in appropriate school environments and 8 hours of seminar class instruction in the teaching area. P: 9-12 s.h. in major field and/or consent of instructor. Introduces teaching of business, marketing, and family and consumer sciences education.
2212. Basic Programming for Business Applications (3) (F,S,SS)
P: BITE 2112 or equivalent. Designing and coding basic programs related to business applications for use on microcomputer.
2311. Financial Information Systems (3) (F,S,SS)
3 lecture hours per week. Financial information systems procedures and problems of business organizations. Emphasis on computerized applications.
2500. Electronic Information Processing II (3) (F,S,SS)
3 lecture hours per week. P: BITE 1500 or consent of instructor. Electronic keyboarding skill building and application of detailed information processing concepts in production of documents generated through electronic delivery system.
3200. Distribution Technology I: Merchandising (3) (F,S,SS)
Basic business and merchandising procedures. Emphasis on store operations, merchandising math, pricing, strategies, and inventory procedures.
3220. Business Communications (3) (WI) (F,S,SS)
All students pursuing an undergraduate business education or marketing education teacher certification option must earn a grade of C or better. P: ENGL 1200. Development of understanding of need for effective communications in business through application of basic principles of written communications to solution of specific business problems.
3228. Administrative Management (3) (F,S,SS)
Evolving concepts and practices of administrative management. Emphasis on handling information.
3291, 3292, 3293, 3294. Internship: Supervised
Work Experience (1,2,3,4) (F,S,SS) Work hours for 3291: 100; for 3292: 200; for 3293: 300; for 3294: 400. May be taken in any combination for a maximum of 4 s.h. P: Consent of a dept coordinator and a minimum of 1 semester as a full-time ECU student.
3301. Distribution Technology II: Promotion (3) (F,S,SS)
P: ECON 2113. Technical promotional problems of concern to distribution supervisory personnel.
3302. Distribution Technology III: Selling (3) (F,S,SS)
Basic business and selling procedures. Emphasis on selling preparation, selling techniques and procedures, and selling aids.
3311. Financial Information Systems II (3) (F,S,SS)
3 lecture hours per week. P: BITE 2311. Automated approach to accounting through use of integrated computer software.
3500. Electronic Information Processing III (3) (F,S,SS)
3 lecture hours per week. P: BITE 2500 or equivalent. Advanced information processing. Applications of modern-day information processing systems.
4200. Microcomputer Business Applications (3) (F,S,SS)
3 lecture hours per week. P: BITE 2500 or consent of instructor. Advanced course in use of specialized microcomputer applications software to produce business documents and reports.
4300. Administrative Office Procedures (3) (F,S,SS)
Role of administrative support personnel on the job.
4323. Methods of Teaching Career and Technical Education (3) (F)
P: Admission to upper division; P/C: PSYC 4305 or consent of instructor. Methodology related to student’s special interest areas. Topics include planning for instruction, group and individualized instructional techniques and strategies, instructional materials development and utilization, community resources utilization, and evaluating student progress.
4324. Internship in Career and Technical Education (10) (F,S)
Full-time, semester-long internship. P: Admission to upper division; C: BITE 4325. Internship in assigned workforce preparedness education public school classroom.
4325. Internship Seminar: Issues in Career and Technical Education (0) (F,S)
P: Admission to upper division; C: BITE 4324. Individualized study of problems or issues pertinent to workforce preparedness education.
4390. Consumer Financial Management (3) (WI) (F,S,SS)
Credit management, consumer economics, personal finance, money and banking, risk management, and small business management.
4400. Administration and Supervision of Career and Technical Education (3) (S,SS)
Organization, administration, and supervision of workforce preparedness education programs. Topics include history of career and technical education programs, school-to-work transition programs, management of youth organizations, and career and technical education curricula.
4435. Instructional Strategies for Technical Training (3) (F, S, SS)
This course focuses on the development of strategies, concepts, and materials for the use of computer technology in enhancing instruction.
4500. Information Processing Systems Design (3) (F,S,SS)
P: BITE 2212, 2213, 2500; or equivalent. Concepts and systems in automated office environment. Preparation for decision-making roles in information processing and/or management. Emphasis on conducting feasibility studies and dealing with change.
4700. Web Site Design and Maintenance (3) (F, S, SS)
or BITE 5503. Integrating Information Processing Technology into Business and Information Technologies Education (3) (F, S, SS) An advanced course in the use of specialized software and microcomputer applications to produce web pages and administer web sites.
5200. Microcomputer Business Graphics Applications (3) (F,S,SS)
P: BITE 4200 or consent of instructor. Advanced course in specialized graphics-oriented microcomputer applications software used to produce business documents, reports, brochures, newsletters, pamphlets, and other page or screen composition publications.
5205. Teaching Special Populations in Business and Information Technologies Education (3)
P: SPED 2000 or equivalent. Emphasis on modification and development of materials, curricula, and programs for special populations in career and technical education.
5388, 5389, 5390. Seminar in Business and Information Technologies Education (3,3,3) (F,S,SS)
May be repeated for credit with change of topic. Problem areas of major concern in Business and Information Technologies Education.
5500. Independent Study in Business and Information Technologies Education (3) (F,S,SS)
P: Senior or graduate standing. Independent study, research, and investigation in business and information technologies education.
5503. Integrating Information Processing Technology into Business and Information Technologies Education (3) (F, S, SS)
P for undergraduate students: Senior or graduate standing; consent of dept chair. Integration of information processing technology into career and technical education curricula.

BUSI: Business

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1200. Strategy First (3) (F,S,SS)
Investigation of the factors that contribute to a firm’s ability to survive long-term in a competitive environment.
2200. Leadership I: Interpersonal and Teamwork Skills (3) (F,S)
P/C: BUSI 1200. Survey and application of interpersonal and teamwork skills related to effective business leadership.
3200. Leadership II: Professional Development Skills (2) (F,S)
P/C: BUSI 2200. Survey and application of professional development skills necessary for effective business leadership.
4001, 4002, 4003. Internship in Business (1,2,3) (F,S,SS)
P: Consent of instructor. May be repeated for maximum of 6 s.h. Part-time experience under the supervision of a business owner, manager, or business professional. Students are limited to 3 hours of internship in any one semester.
4200. Leadership III: Leadership Capstone (1) (F,S)
P: BUSI 3200; senior standing; declared major in College of Business. Synthesis and application of business leadership skills.