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Campus Grounds

Permeable Paving

ECU is excited to be on track to install its first permeable paving project this summer (2010). The area on the eastern end of Wright Plaza will be modified by removing concrete, compacted soils and an old fire lane system. A permeable pavement system will allow rainwater to infiltrate the soils and aquifer. The use of pervious paving is among the Best Management Practices (BMP) recommended by the EPA and other agencies for the management of storm water runoff on a regional and local basis. Permeable pavers eliminates the need for retention ponds, bioswales, and other storm water devices, and provides more efficient land use.

Storm water Management - By allowing water to soak through and infiltrate, permeable pavement reduces storm water flow and pollutant loads. Minimize Site Disturbance - By integrating paving and drainage, less site area may need to be used to manage storm water, allowing a more compact site development footprint. Cool - The voids reduce mass reducing the heat build up associated with heat islands. Lighter colored paving can increase reflectivity. Not specifically approved for achieving LEED Credit SS 7. 
Pervious Pavers 1Pervious Pavers 2Pervious Pavers 3


Cisterns

CisternAs a major consumer of water on campus, ECU Grounds Department recently installed four rainwater cisterns and rooftop collection systems to collect and use rain water for landscape irrigation. Retention ponds on Health Sciences Campus and at the new North Recreational Complex also aid in irrigation by using the water that would otherwise be lost to runoff while saving the university significant amount of money in city water.

The grounds department has also begun using more native and drought tolerant vegetation on campus, which allows the university to irrigate far less than it previously did. These plants require less water, less mowing, and fewer chemicals to survive, which is also beneficial to the environment.

When irrigation is necessary, ECU uses an advanced system equipped with a weather station that determines how much water is lost in a day. The irrigation system is then able to deliver the precise amount of water needed to the landscape, effectively eliminating over watering.

Ponds

Croatan Wet PondRetention ponds such as Lake Laupus on Health Sciences Campus and others located behind Croatan Dining Hall and at the North Recreational Complex also aid in stormwater management. In addition to aquatic plants that filter runoff, the water is also held in place to ease pressure on the city system then used for irrigation, which saves the university significant amounts of money in leiu of treated water.



Smart Irrigation

Rain BirdWhen irrigation is necessary, ECU uses an advanced Irrigation Control (IQ) system equipped with a weather station that will calculate the evapotranspiration (ET) rate for a day. The irrigation system is then able to deliver the precise amount of water needed to the landscape, effectively eliminating over watering.

The IQ system is currently operating efficiently at the Smith-Williams Center, Blount Intramural Fields, North Recreational Complex, and the brand new Student Center on Health Sciences Campus. Planning for future expansion of the IQ system on campus is underway. This system will allow the University to save a significant amount of water by running multiple zones at one time. In addition, the system will identify leaks and shut off the water supply at the break while the system is running, which will prevent wasted water and possible safety concerns with a blow out. This will certainly help our cause when we have another drought and the State wants us to cease all watering.

 

Native Landscaping

The grounds department has also begun using more native and drought tolerant vegetation on campus, which allows the university to irrigate far less than it previously did. These plants require less water, less mowing, and fewer chemicals to survive, which is also beneficial to the environment.


Tree Campus USA

Tree Campus USA

East Carolina University has been designated a Tree Campus USA by the National Arbor Day Foundation for 2016.  In order to qualify for this designation, ECU worked over the course of the past year to meet the following Tree Campus USA Standards:

 

Standard 1 – Campus Tree Advisory Committee

This committee must include a representative from each of the following audience:

Students

  • Bai Xiong
  • Matthew Chilton    

Faculty

  • Dr. Claudia Jolls, Biology
  • Dr. Carol Goodwillie, Biology

Facility Management

  • Bill Bagnell, AVC for Campus Operations
  • John Gill, Director of Grounds Services
  • Gene Stano, Supervisor of Grounds Services

Community Member

  • Kevin Heifferon, City of Greenville Arborist and Superintendent of Building and Grounds


Standard 2 – Campus Tree Care Plan

The ECU Campus Tree Care Plan includes:

  1. Clearly stated purpose.
  2. Responsible authority/department - who enforces the Campus Tree Care Plan.
  3. Establishment of a Campus Tree Advisory Committee, terms of the representatives, and role committee plays.
  4. Campus tree care policies for planting, landscaping, maintenance and removal including establishing and updating a list of recommended and prohibited species; managing for catastrophic events.
  5. Protection and Preservation policies and procedures - include process for implementing tree protection plan including step-by-step process that every project must follow including construction and trenching.
  6. Goals and Targets - develop at least one goal and target for your Campus Tree Plan. These could include (but are not limited to) tree canopy target, development of a link between the Campus Tree Plan and other green initiatives on campus or in the community; completion of a campus-wide tree inventory, etc. Include how the goal will be measured.
  7. Tree damage assessment - enforcement, penalties, and appeals.
  8. Prohibited practices.
  9. Definitions of terminology related to campus trees.
  10. Communication strategy - how the campus tree care plan will be communicated to the college community and contractors to heighten awareness about policies and procedures as well as the goals of the institution.


Standard 3 – Campus Tree Program with Dedicated Annual Expenditures

Expenditures could include, but are not limited to:

  • Cost of trees purchased
  • Labor, equipment and supplies for tree planting, maintenance (pruning, watering, fertilization, mulching, competition control, etc.) and removal, if needed
  • Value of volunteer labor and other contributions from student or civic organizations
  • Staff time dedicated to campus forest planning, tree care contractors, public education, professional training, campus tree inventory, and association memberships


Standard 4 – Arbor Day Observance

An Arbor Day observance provides a golden opportunity to educate the campus community on the benefits of the trees on their campus property and in the community. The Arbor Day observance can be on the campus or held in conjunction with the community where the campus is located. Your observance may be held at an appropriate time for your campus as long as it is related to trees in some way.


Standard 5 – Service Learning Project

ECU met this standard through the following tree planting events on campus: 

  • Earth Day (4/20/16)
  • ReLeaf Community Tree Day (3/18/17)

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