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Dr. Paul Cunningham, dean of the Brody School of Medicine, left, and Dr. Phyllis Horns, interim vice chancellor for health sciences, unveiled a painting of 41 people who helped bring the medical school to ECU, during the 2008 Brody fall convocation. Held Oct. 23, the event also served as an offical welcome for Cunningham, who began serving as dean Sept. 15. (Photo by Cliff Hollis)
 

Brody Recognizes Leaders in School’s Establishment

By Doug Boyd

East Carolina University officials unveiled a painting Oct. 23 honoring 41 people who worked to bring a medical school to a rural university in eastern North Carolina.

Dr. Paul Cunningham, dean of the Brody School of Medicine at ECU, and Dr. Phyllis Horns, interim vice chancellor for health sciences, pulled the cover from the painting during the school’s fall convocation.

The event also officially welcomed Cunningham, who was named dean in July and started work Sept. 15.

Among the honorees who attended the event was Dr. Ed Monroe, a private practice physician who not only helped convince legislators and the University of North Carolina Board of Governors to build the medical school but also served as the first dean of the ECU School of Allied Health Sciences and vice chancellor for health affairs.

“If it wasn’t for his hard work, tenacity and getting under the skin of some people in Raleigh, we wouldn’t be standing here,” said Steve Lawler, president of Pitt County Memorial Hospital, who spoke at the event.

Other honorees include former ECU Chancellor Leo W. Jenkins, Leo and Samuel Brody and former Gov. Jim Hunt.

The painting is by ECU graduate Cameron Jackson.

The convocation was held in the auditorium of the new East Carolina Heart Institute at ECU, the first official event to be held in the new $60 million building. The four-story, 206,000-square-foot building at 115 Heart Blvd. on the ECU health sciences campus houses offices and research labs for cardiologists, cardiothoracic surgeons, vascular surgeons and scientists. It also houses outpatient treatment and educational facilities.

10/28/08
This page originally appeared in the Nov. 3, 2008 issue of Pieces of Eight. Complete issue is archived at http://www.ecu.edu/news/poe/Arch.cfm.