The Sonic Gates

Shock sensitive

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The following materials are shock-sensitive, and may decompose violently if struck or heated. Solids are also prone to explosive decomposition if ground, for example with pestle and mortar. A few of the materials listed are not, of themselves, explosive, but mixtures of them with combustible material such as organic reagents, may be dangerous.



acetaldehyde

aluminum ophorite explosive

amatol

ammonal

ammonium nitrate

ammonium perchlorate

ammonium picrate

benzoyl peroxide

2-Butanol



butyl tetryl

calcium nitrate

copper acetylide

cumene

cyanuric triazide

cyanogen Bromide

cyclohexane

cyclotrimethylenetrinitramine

dicyclopentadiene

diethyl Ether

dinitroresorcinol

dinitroethyleneurea

dinitroglycerine

dinitrophenol

dinitrophenolates

dinitrophenyl hydrazine

dinitrotoluene

dioxane

dipicrylamine

dipicryl sulfone

erythritol tetranitrate

ethylene glycol dimethyl

ether

ethyl ether

ethyl vinyl ether

fulminating mercury

fulminating gold

fulminating platinum

fulminating silver

gelatinized nitrocellulose

guanyl nitrosamino

guanyltetrazene

guanyl nitrosamino

guanylidene

hydrazine

hydrazoic acid

heavy metal azide

hexanite

hexanitrodiphenylamine

hexanitrostilbene

hexogen

hyrazinium nitrate

isopropyl ether

lead azide

lead mannite

lead mononitroresorcinate

lead picrate

lead salts

lead styphnate

magnesium ophorite

magnesium perchlorate

mannitol hexanitrate

mercury oxalate

mercury fulminate

mercury oxalate

mercury tartrate

mononitrotoluene

nitrated carbohydrate

nitrated glucoside

nitrated polyhydric alcohol

nitrogen triiodide

nitrogen trichloride

nitroglycerin

nitroglycide

nitroglycol

nitroguanidine

nitromethane

nitronium perchlorate

nitroparaffins

nitrotoluene

nitrourea

organic amine nitrates

organic peroxides

organic nitramines

perchloric acid

picramic acid

picramide

picratol

picric acid

picryl chloride

picryl fluoride

polynitro aliphatic compounds

potassium metal

potassium nitroaminotetrazole

potassium perchlorate

robenzoic acid

silver acetylide

silver azide

silver fulminate

silver styphnate

silver tetrazene

sodatol

sodium amatol

sodium azide

sodium dinitro-ortho-cresolate

sodium nitrate/potassium nitrate (Mixture)

sodium perchlorate

sodium picramate

styrene

syphnic acid

tert-butyl hydroperoxide

tetrahydrofuran (THF)

tetranitrocarbazole

tetraze

tetrytol

triethylene glycol divinyl ether

trimethylolethane

trimonite

trinit

trinitroresorcinol

trinitroanisole

trinitrobenzene

trinitrobenzoic acid

trinitrocresol

trinitro-meta-cresol

trinitronaphthalene

trinitrophenetol

trinitrophloroglucinol

trinitrotoluene (TNT)

urea ammonium nitrate

urea nitrate

vinyl chloride

vinylidene chloride acetylides



The above table provides examples of peroxide-forming and/or shock sensitive chemicals only and is not an inclusive list. Consult Material Safety Data Sheets for information on the peroxide-forming potential and shock sensitivity of specific chemicals.

Shock sensitive materials should be kept to a minimum by maintaining proper inventory consistent with the rate of use. Inventory is also important in order to dispose of chemicals which tend to form unstable materials with age, such as ethers, or materials which become dangerous when they become dehydrated, such as picric acids. Shock-sensitive materials should be stored in a cool, dry area, and protected from heat and shock. During storage, the materials should be segregated from incompatible materials including flammables and corrosives. Materials which are used specifically because of their explosive properties should be treated as an explosive of the appropriate class and kept in a explosive proof locker or the equivalent storage area.

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