ECU Phelps Archaeology Lab

Overview

The Phelps Archaeology lab has the capability of supporting multiple projects simultaneously, including projects from the earliest Paleoindian cultures to the latest historical periods. Named for its founding director, the Phelps Archaeology Laboratory is administered by the Department of anthropology and located in the Flanagan Building on the campus of East Carolina University. The lab serves to foster research and education concerning the history and prehistory of eastern North Carolina.

Equipment

There is sufficient field equipment to outfit multiple field crews including two total stations and a ground penetrating radar unit.

Facilities

The lab has the facilities to handle artifact processing and cataloging as well as drafting and photography for report preparation. Most of these operations have been computerized utilizing such peripheral devices as: flatbed and slide scanners, digital cameras, and two Recon PDAs for collecting and storing digital data in the field.

Current Projects

Return to main Archaeology Labs page

Department News

Dr. Holly Mathews joined an interdisciplinary discussion panel on the Ebola Outbreak. The resulting article from the Daily Reflector describes the panel and discussion!
The Anthropology Student Organization (ASO) raised funds with Project Tumara to provide education and donations for the Ebola outbreak. Check out The East Carolinian for more details!
Dr. David Griffith received the Harriot College of Arts and Sciences Distinguished Professor Award and is announced as the Interim Director for the Institute of Coastal Science and Policy!
Check out the Department of Anthropology newsletter highlighting some of our recent activities! Download a copy here.

Congratulations to our graduate students published in the North Carolina Archaeology Journal!

  • New Data, Old Methods: The Rediscovery, Definition, and Functional Analysis of the George Moore House at Colonial Brunswick Town, by Jennifer L. Gabriel, pp. 71-93
  • NAGPRA's Impact on Academic Research in North Carolina and the Southeast, by William C. Broughton, pp. 94-121
  • Archaeologists as Activists: Can Archaeologists Change the World?, edited by M. Jay Stottman (book review), by Hannah P. Smith, pp. 130-136
Dr. Charles Ewen was elected president of the Society for Historic Archaeology, one of the largest anthropological organizations in the United States.
Dr. David Griffith recently received NSF funding for the research project "Managed Migration and the Value of Labor."