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Faculty Publications

Our faculty have diverse research interests, and we publish in many disciplines including: children's literature, creative writing, film studies, folklore, linguistics, literature, multicultural and transnational literatures, rhetoric and composition, teaching English to speakers of other languages, technical and professional communication, and more. This page includes a small sample of our recent publications in both popular and academic venues. 

New Century Literature

New Century Literature available in 2016

Associate Professor Rick Taylor (along with co-author Corinee Guy) has published an introductory literature textbook entitled New Century Literature with Kendall Hunt Publishing.

Klein publishes in open-access journal FILM CRITICISM

Associate Professor Amanda Klein's essay "The Academic Film Blog (2000-2015), A Eulogy" appears in the newly rebooted open access version of FILM CRITICISM.

"Complex Spenser" appears in Renaissance Quarterly

Associate Professor Thomas Herron published an invited review-essay, "Complex Spenser: New Directions in Recent Research," in Renaissance Quarterly 68.3 (2015), 957-69.

Diagnosing Folklore Perspectives on Disability, Health, and Trauma

Diagnosing Folklore cover
Dr. Andrea Kitta's co-authored Diagnosing Folklore provides an inclusive forum for an expansive conversation on the sensitive, raw, and powerful processes that shape and imbue meaning in the lives of individuals and communities beleaguered by medical stigmatization, conflicting public perceptions, and contextual constraints. This volume aims to showcase current ideas and debates, as well as promote the larger study of disability, health, and trauma within folkloristics, helping bridge the gaps between the folklore discipline and disability studies.

 

'La felice victoria': Bartolomé de Flores's 'A Newly Composed Work, Which Recounts the Happy Victory That God, in His Infinite Goodness and Mercy, Was Pleased to Give to the Illustrious Señor Pedro Menéndez' (1571)

Dr. Tom Shields recently published a work he presented earlier this fall at a Faculty Speaker Series talk: "'La felice victoria': Bartolomé de Flores's 'A Newly Composed Work, Which Recounts the Happy Victory That God, in His Infinite Goodness and Mercy, Was Pleased to Give to the Illustrious Señor Pedro Menéndez' (1571)." This translation, done with his colleague Thomas Hallock at the University of South Florida, appears in Common-place: The Journal of Early American Life, an online publication from the American Antiquarian Society and the University of Connecticut. The poem is about the battle between the French and the Spanish over the earliest settlement of Florida 450 years ago this year.

A Poet Who Takes All Her Risks in Writing

Thomas

Assistant Professor Amber Thomas was recently profiled on North Carolina Public Radio. Learn more via WUNC.

"Welcome to the Big Apple"

Transition cover

Associate Professor Marame Gueye has published a short story entitled "Welcome to the Big Apple" in Transition, a publication of the Hutchins Center at Harvard University.

 "The Sidneys in Ireland"

ashgate cover

Associate Professor Thomas Herron contributed a piece entitled "The Sidneys in Ireland" to the 2015 Ashgate Research Companion to the Sidneys, 1500-1700, vol. I: Lives. The book is edited by Michael Brennan, Margaret Hannay and Mary Ellen Lamb. Learn more here.

"Technical Rhetorics: Making Specialized Persuasion Apparent to Public Audiences"

 
gastric bypass image
In this essay, Assistant Professor Erin Frost and Associate Professor Michelle Eble argue that "technical rhetorics" is a concept that has affordances for thinking about how to critically communicate with public audiences about specialized information. Invoking specialized information and persuasion in combination can help remind us—technical communication researchers, teachers, practitioners—that we have an obligation to emphasize the persuasive nature of the work that we do and study when interfacing with public audiences. The authors use gastric bypass surgery as an example to apply their argument. Read the article here.

 

Consider the "Catfish"

Consider the catfish
This article by Dr. Amanda Klein was published in the online version of the New Yorker. Read it here.
American Militarism Small Screen

American Militarism on the Small Screen

Associate Professor Anna Froula (along with co-editor Stacy Takacs) has published American Militarism on the Small Screen.  

The military has produced and distributed programs via private broadcasters since the early days of radio, and war and militarism have been popular subjects for commercial television programming from its inception. Despite the historical and social prevalence of military-themed programming on US television, there has been no thorough scholarly investigation of this phenomenon. This volume seeks to identify what television, as a cultural medium, has added to the depictions of war and militarism in the US. Chapters explore a variety of series and engage with the following questions: What are the conventions of the war series? How do fictional depictions of war on US TV operate in dialogue with existing war films? How do they relate to broadcast news coverage of war? Is there anything unique about the way television series, as opposed to films, documentaries, or news stories, depict issues of nationalism and militarism? How do issues of race, class, gender, and sexuality play out differently in the television combat series, for example? How have the conventions of television production, distribution, and reception affected the form, content, and influence of the war story?

Multiplicities

Cycles, Sequels, Spin-offs, Remakes, and Reboots: Multiplicities in Film and Television

Associate Professor Amanda Ann Klein (along with co-editor R. Barton Palmer) has published Cycles, Sequels, Spin-offs, Remakes, and Reboots: Multiplicities in Film and Television. The collection "investigates the important cultural work performed by repetition, or multiplicities, in film and television."

Literacy in Practice

Caswell publishes on the role of emotion in teacher-responses

Assistant Professor and Writing Center Director Nicole Caswell has published a chapter entitled "Emotionally Exhausting: Investigating the Role of Emotion in Teacher-Response Practices" in Literacy in Practice: Writing in Private, Public, and Working Lives. Editors Patrick Thomas and Pam Takayoshi (Routledge), 2016, 148-160.

Real World

Klein publishes on "The Real World" in The New Yorker

Associate Professor Amanda Klein's recent "Thirty Seasons of the Real World" in The New Yorker discusses the importance of "the longest-running human experiment captured by television cameras."

 

"Instant Ancestors" appears in december

"Instant Ancestors" (fiction) by Professor Luke Whisnant was published in the journal december in Fall 2015.

"Black Mosquito Netting" published in Chicago Quarterly Review

 Professor Luke Whisnant's "Black Mosquito Netting" (fiction) was published in Chicago Quarterly Review in Fall 2015.

"Recasting The Best Years of Our Lives: Gender, Revision, and Military Women in the Veteran's Homecoming Film"

Future Texts

Dr. Anna Froula recently published a chapter in Future Texts: Subversive Performance and Feminist Bodies. The book, edited by Vicki Callahan and Virginia Kuhn, came out with Parlor Press in late 2015.

"'Clueless' and the end of Gen X: How Cher Horowitz taught us to stop worrying and embrace millennial optimism, post-racial fantasy and the 1 percent."

clueless
This article by Dr. Amanda Klein was published on major news website Salon in July 2015. Read the full article.

 

 "Later I Find Out My Mother Has Read on WebMD That Antioxidants Can Prevent Cancer"

whisnant

Fiction Southeast has recently published Professor Luke Whisnant's short story "Later I Find Out My Mother Has Read on WebMD That Antioxidants Can Prevent Cancer."

Campus Ghost Walk/Folk Talk

ghost

Teaching instructor Randall Martoccia recently had a documentary entitled Campus Ghost Walk/Folk Talk aired on Greenville-Pitt Access Television (GPAT, Channel 23). View the documentary here

**This page is under construction. Thank you for your patience.** 

Our faculty have diverse research interests, and we publish in many disciplines including: children's literature, creative writing, film studies, folklore, linguistics, literature, multicultural and transnational literatures, rhetoric and composition, teaching English to speakers of other languages, technical and professional communication, and more. The center panel of this page includes a small sample of our recent publications in both popular and academic venues, and you can see a more complete listing in the English news blog's Faculty Publications section. Use the sidebars to find works in specific categories or date ranges.

Faculty research by publication date

Spring/Summer 2015

Fall/Winter 2015

Spring/Summer 2016

Texas Czech Legacy Project
Texas Czech Legacy Project: http://www.laits.utexas.edu/txczechproject/home The goal of this Project is to create a central place documenting the language, culture, and history of ethnic Czech Moravians in Texas. The Project’s main initiative is the building of an open-access digital Texas Czech Dialect Archive (TCDA) of audio-recordings gathered from ethnic Czech Moravians in Texas since the 1970s through the 2000s. The Project’s mission is to create

Amanda Klein Freelance Work
Check of Dr. Amanda Klein’s freelance work: “Spinoff City: Why Hollywood Is Built on Unoriginal Ideas.” The Atlantic 20 March 2016. “Thirty Seasons of The Real World.” The New Yorker. 28 Nov 2015. “Consider the Catfish.” The New Yorker. 3 Sept 2015. “‘Clueless’ and the end of Gen X: How Cher Horowitz taught us to stop worrying and embrace millennial

Erin Frost Gives Keynote at the 2017 Feminist Scholars Digital Workshop
Dr. Erin A. Frost was a Keynote Speaker at the 2017 Feminist Scholars Digital Workshop last week. Her workshop, “Feminist Credibility: Negotiating Subjectivity in Public Spaces,” examined the ways women’s experiences are often treated as less credible than other perspectives in supposedly “objective” and “neutral” spaces, from research to politics. Dr. Frost also created a website that contains a variety of

Congratulations to Alex Albright!
Congratulations to Alex Albright, whose article “Mose McQuitty’s Band and Minstrel Days, 1899-1937” has been selected for the Stuart Thayer Prize from the Circus Historical Society for the best article published on circus history in 2016. Alex will receive the prize and present a portion of the article at the annual meeting of the Circus Historical Society in July in

John Hoppenthaler’s 9/11 poem “A Jar of Rain” has been reprinted
John Hoppenthaler’s 9/11 poem, “A Jar of Rain,” has been reprinted in the anthology Eyes Glowing at the Edge of the Woods: Fiction and Poetry from West Virginia (West Virginia UP, 2017). https://www.newpages.com/book-reviews/eyes-glowing-at-edge-of-woods