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Graduate Programs

Master of Arts in English

The Master of Arts in English is a 33-semester-hour program that offers both a thesis and non-thesis option. The program is unique in the variety of experiences and opportunities provided to the students. 

Each entering student should consult with the Director of Graduate Studies, who will review curriculum requirements and options and will suggest appropriate courses related to available concentrations: English Studies, Literature, Linguistics, TESOL, Technical and Professional Communication (TPC), Rhetoric and Composition, Creative Writing, and Multicultural and Transnational Literatures (MTL). The TPC and MTL concentrations can be taken as online programs. See more details below.

A minimum of 33 s.h. of course work is required, with a final presentation on the Thesis or Comprehensive Assessment Project.

Coursework and Other Degree Requirements 

A research methods course, selected from the following (3 s.h.) 

ENGL 6009 Research Methods in Language Study
ENGL 6702 Research Methods in technical and Professional Communication
ENGL 6805 Research: The Writer's Perspective
ENGL 7005 Bibliography and Methods
ENGL 7601 Research Design in Rhetoric and Composition 

Electives (6 s.h.) 

English courses outside the concentration or from another department. Note: Students wishing to receive a graduate teaching assistantship must complete ENGL 6625 Teaching Composition: Theory and Practice.  

Thesis or Non-Thesis Option (6 s.h.) 

Students will complete either a thesis that demonstrates the student's ability to gather, arrange, and interpret material that bears on a particular problem or a Comprehensive Assessment Project (CAP) with additional coursework in English. 

Learn more about the difference between a thesis and a CAP, or check out the specific details on these options that are listed under particular concentration areas below.

Area of Concentration (18 s.h.) 

Choose one concentration area from those listed below.

Area Coordinator: Professor John Hoppenthaler (hoppenthalerj@ecu.edu)

Description

The Master's Degree in English with a Concentration in Creative Writing is an advanced degree with a specialty in the writing of original poetry, fiction, scripts and plays, or creative nonfiction. Because ours is a studio writing program, primary emphasis is on the student's writing experience; students are encouraged to take the writing workshop in their genre of study as many as three times for credit. The program is designed according to guidelines established by the Association of Writers and Writing Programs, which is the primary source for information on creative writing programs in English. Abiding by AWP's principles, instruction in the Creative Writing concentration is only offered face-to-face.

The study of contemporary literature and the forms, craft, themes, and aesthetics of writing are incorporated into the workshops and also offered in separate seminars. The MA with a Concentration in Creative Writing is designed for writers who want to continue their study with an MFA, DFA, or PhD; who wish to become qualified to teach creative writing and/or English at the community college level; or who simply wish to better their creative writing.

Coursework and Other Requirements (Graduate Catalog)

Students may take a maximum of 12 hours of workshop classes (ENGL 6840, 6850, 6868, 6898) for credit towards their degree. Students are required to take a minimum of 6 hours of CW electives (ENGL 6865, 6870, 6880). The 18 semester hours in Creative Writing includes no more than 12 s.h. of workshops and a complement of CW electives to equal 18 s.h.

For questions regarding coursework and requirements, please contact the area coordinator.

Select up to four workshops* (maximum of 12 s.h.)

ENGL 6840 Advanced Poetry Writing
ENGL 6850 Advanced Fiction Writing
ENGL 6868 Advanced Nonfiction Writing
ENGL 6898 Advanced Script Writing
*Any one workshop may be taken for credit up to three times.

Select at least two CW electives (minimum of 6 s.h.)

ENGL 6865 Creative Writing
ENGL 6870 Literature from the Writer's Perspective
ENGL 6880 Directed Readings in Creative Writing

Thesis or Comprehensive Assessment Requirement (6 s.h.)

  1. Thesis Option: a collection of original poetry, fiction, creative nonfiction, or drama. Produced according to Graduate School criteria. (6 s.h.)
  2. Comprehensive Assessment Requirement (CAP) Option: A comprehensive assessment project and additional coursework in English. (6 s.h.)

Area Coordinator: Dr. Andrea Kitta (englishgrad@ecu.edu)

Coursework and Other Requirements (Graduate Catalog)

Students seeking a concentration in English Studies must submit a plan of study for approval to the Director of Graduate Studies.

Comprehensive Studies (18 s.h.)

Develop an approved, unified program of study including at least two or more concentrations or areas of study for a total of 18 s.h. of coursework chosen from ENGL courses.

Thesis or Comprehensive Assessment Project (6 s.h.)

A thesis, demonstrating the student's ability to gather, arrange, and interpret material which bears on a particular problem (6 s.h.) or a Comprehensive Assessment Project (CAP) with additional coursework in English (6 s.h.). Students completing a CAP will be able to demonstrate conceptual and critical awareness of how different areas of English Studies intersect and inform each other. They will also be able to synthesize and explain connections among their own work from at least three areas of English Studies. The ad-hoc Committee on English Studies recommended the following elements of the CAP: 1. Annotated Bibliography/Reading List (20-25 items, with book length works counting as 3 items each. These should be annotated.) 2. Paper/Project (This research paper (15-18 pages) should use the annotated bibliography/reading list that synthesizes research/scholarship on a topic that brings together at least three areas of English Studies.)

For further information, please call 252-328-6660 or email the Director of Graduate Studies, Dr. Michelle Eble, at englishgrad@ecu.edu

Area Coordinator: Dr. Michael Aceto (acetom@ecu.edu)

Description

The Department of English at East Carolina University offers a variety of graduate courses in theoretical and applied linguistics. These courses provide an insight into the theoretical and applied areas of linguistics and function as a bridge between the humanities and the social sciences, and between language studies and other academic areas, such as anthropology, education, and speech and hearing sciences.

Our Linguistics graduate students help organize the annual TALGS (TESOL and Applied Linguistics Graduate Students) conference, which provides graduate students and TESOL/TEFL professionals a forum to showcase their research and teaching practices.

You can contact the area coordinator if you have any questions about required coursework or the program in general. On admission, you will be initially advised by the area coordinator; as your research interests begin to focus, you will choose an advisor in your area of interest.

Coursework and Other Requirements (Graduate Catalog)

For questions regarding coursework and requirements, please contact Dr. Solveig Bosse (bosses@ecu.edu).

Required course (3 s.h.)

ENGL 6530 Descriptive Linguistics

Select five courses from the following (15 s.h)

ENGL 6505 Linguistic and Cultural History of the English Language
ENGL 6526 The Structure of English: Phonology and Morphology
ENGL 6527 The Structure of English: Syntax and Semantics
ENGL 6528 Teaching English as a Second Language: Theories and Principles
ENGL 6529 Applied Linguistics for ESL Teachers
ENGL 6531 TESL: Methods and Practicum
ENGL 6525 Language and Society
ENGL 6535 Principles of Language Testing
ENGL 6680 Writing Systems of the World
ENGL 7565 Linguistics, Education, and ESL
ENGL 7605 Discourse Analysis

Thesis or Comprehensive Assessment Project Requirement (6 s.h.)

A. The Comprehensive Assessment Project (CAP) and additional coursework in English consists of an annotated bibliography and a synthesis paper. When prepared, the student presents the project to the CAP committee during a scheduled exam. Following the presentation, committee members ask questions related to the project. The CAP demonstrates the student's ability (1) to examine field literature critically and reflectively; and (2) to evaluate the project's findings in the larger context of knowledge gained through his or her coursework.

For the annotated bibliography the student chooses a field-related topic of interest, formulates a research question, and finds, through library research, at least twenty sources directly related to his or her research question. The sources consist of current full-length articles published in peer-reviewed journals, book chapters and/or books. Dissertation abstracts are not acceptable. Foundational work on a given topic, regardless of the date of publication, is admissible. All sources have to be approved by the student's CAP committee before the student begins annotating them. The annotated bibliography follows the APA citation format. It is prefaced by an introduction giving the student's rationale for the project.

For the synthesis paper, the student writes a cover paper synthesizing the information learned from research. The student clearly shows how this research has informed his or her response to the research question. The student draws conclusions and, where relevant, considers practical implications of his or her findings. The paper is 7-10 pages (cc. 2,000-2,500 words) in length.

B. The Thesis requires 6 s.h. of thesis (ENGL 7000), and is recommended for those who plan to continue their studies in a PhD program. The Thesis option requires a Prospectus Meeting with the Thesis Committee and an Oral Defense of the completed Thesis. A full description of thesis requirements is provided by the Department of English graduate studies office or e-mail englishgrad@ecu.edu.

Area Coordinator: Dr. Ken Parille

Description

The M.A. in English with a concentration in Literature is an advanced degree focusing on literary study. The program is committed to a well-rounded approach that emphasizes the study of literary periods, genres, and major authors in concert with important theoretical methods, such as historicism, formalism, feminism, and cultural studies. Students choose from a wide variety of courses in British, American, European, ethnic, and global literatures as well as genre courses, such as Folklore and Children's Literature.

The majority of our courses are taught in a discussion format that values student interaction and promotes exploration and experimentation. We encourage our students to complement their work in literature with classes from other fields, such as rhetoric and composition, technical and professional writing, linguistics, creative writing, and film.

Coursework and Other Requirements (Graduate Catalog)

For questions regarding coursework and other requirements, please contact the area coordinator.

Select two courses from the following (6 s.h.)

ENGL 6151 British Literature Before 1800
ENGL 6220 American Literature Before 1865

Select two courses from the following (6 s.h.)

ENGL 5150 Topics in the Novel
ENGL 5170 Modern Drama
ENGL 5230 Southern Regional Literature
ENGL 5280 Topics in Poetry
ENGL 6155 British Literature After 1800
ENGL 6195 Topics in Drama
ENGL 6220 American Literature Before 1865
ENGL 6250 American Literature After 1865
ENGL 6270 Literature and the Environment
ENGL 6330 Studies in Latino/a Literatures
ENGL 6350 Studies in Native American Literature
ENGL 6390 Advanced Studies of Science Fiction and Fantasy

Select two courses from any of those mentioned above, as well as from the following (6 s.h.)

ENGL 5330 Studies in Women's Literature
ENGL 6065 Topics in Literary Theory and Criticism
ENGL 6340 Ethnic American Literature
ENGL 6360 World Literature Written in English
ENGL 6370 Caribbean Literature
ENGL 6380 Studies in African Literature
ENGL 6450 Studies in World Indigenous Literatures
ENGL 6515 Advanced Studies in Children's Literature
ENGL 6870 Literature: The Writer's Perspective
ENGL 7070 Literary Theory
ENGL 7165 English Literature
ENGL 7265 American Literature
ENGL 7365 Selected Topics in Multicultural and Transnational Literature

Thesis or Comprehensive Assessment Project (6 s.h.)

Comprehensive Assessment Project

The CAP portfolio includes three pieces of writing: a revised seven-to-nine page essay, the unrevised version, and a three–page framing essay.

The student revises a paper written for a graduate course into the type of essay that scholars present at academic conferences. The framing essay discusses the revision process and puts the paper’s ideas and interpretive approaches in the context of the student’s coursework and intellectual development at ECU.

The student and director meet at the beginning of the student’s final semester (or earlier) to develop a plan for the project. At the CAP defense, the student presents the paper and discusses the portfolio with the CAP committee, which includes the director and a second reader. (The one-hour defense typically takes place toward the end of the student’s final semester.)

Unlike the thesis option, the CAP does not require a prospectus or a full committee meeting.

The CAP option requires the student to take six semester hours of coursework that the thesis option does not.

Thesis

The student produces a polished essay of twenty-five to thirty pages that presents an original argument and engages with current scholarship and critical conversations. Working with a director and two committee members, the student prepares an essay targeted to an academic journal selected by the student and committee.

In consultation with the committee, the student writes a 1000-1500-word prospectus that discusses the article’s research question and its hypothesis (the starting claim). The prospectus also includes the following: a proposed outline of the article; a discussion of the target journal; an annotated bibliography; and a timeline for completion with projected due dates for drafts and the defense. The prospectus defense occurs at least one semester before the thesis defense. Most students use the first semester’s thesis hours to write and defend the prospectus and the second semester’s hours to write and defend the article.

The completed thesis follows ECU Graduate School requirements and includes elements not usually found in a literary article, such as an abstract, title page, signature page, and table of contents. In consultation with the director and committee, the student may include a preface with information not in the article but useful in providing context (for example, a discussion of the target journal). Unless the committee suggests another style, the thesis should follow current MLA guidelines. In the case of a format conflict, Graduate School requirements take precedent.

For general thesis information, see the Master of Arts in English Handbook http://www.ecu.edu/cs-cas/engl/upload/Master-of-Arts-in-English-Handbook-2015-2016.pdf. For Graduate School requirements, see the Graduate School’s “Theses & Dissertations—Vireo” http://www.ecu.edu/cs-acad/gradschool/ETD-Vireo.cfm and “Academic Policies and Forms” http://www.ecu.edu/cs-acad/gradschool/Academic-Policies-and-Forms.cfm.


Area Advisor:  Dr. Rick Taylor (taylorr@ecu.edu)
Area Coordinator:  Dr. Su-ching Huang (huangsu@ecu.edu)

MTL Blog

The Master’s Degree in English with a Concentration in Multicultural and Transnational Literatures is an advanced degree focusing on U.S. ethnic and world literatures from local, regional, national, transnational, and global perspectives. In our program, the approach to understanding and appreciating literatures is interdisciplinary, involving the study of historical, political, artistic, geographic, and environmental contexts, as well as literary aesthetics and interpretation. Methodologies are drawn from literary studies, cultural studies, colonial/postcolonial/diasporic studies, and discourse analysis, among others.

The Master’s Degree in English with a Concentration in Multicultural and Transnational Literatures provides excellent preparation for the pursuit of the doctoral degree and a wide range of professions, including secondary and higher education, law, public policy, international service, business, or any profession that would benefit from an understanding of multicultural and global peoples, arts, traditions, histories, interactions, and issues as represented and interpreted through literature and criticism.

The Master’s degree is available as both a campus program (requiring attendance in face-to-face classes on the ECU campus and offering the possibility of research and teaching assistantships), and as a Distance Education (DE) degree offered fully online. (Priority for registration in DE classes is given to students who are officially admitted as DE students.)

On admission to the program, you will be advised initially by Dr. Rick Taylor (taylorr@ecu.edu); as your research interests begin to focus, you will choose or be assigned an advisor in your area of interest.

Coursework and Other Requirements

For questions regarding coursework and other requirements, please contact Dr. Rick Taylor (taylorr@ecu.edu).

Select six courses from the following (18 s.h.)

ENGL 6330 Studies in Latino/a Literature
ENGL 6340 Ethnic American Literature
ENGL 6345 Jewish Literature
ENGL 6350 Studies in Native American Literature
ENGL 6360 World Literatures Written in English
ENGL 6370 Caribbean Literature
ENGL 6375 Middle Eastern Literature
ENGL 6380 Studies in African Literature
ENGL 6420 Studies in Asian American Literature
ENGL 6450 Studies in World Indigenous Literatures
ENGL 6460 Studies in African American Literature
ENGL 7070 Literary Theory
ENGL 7080 Cultural Studies Theory and Method
ENGL 7300 Directed Reading in Multicultural and Transnational Literature
ENGL 7350 Seminar in Multicultural and Transnational Literature
ENGL 7365 Selected Topics in Multicultural and Transnational Literature
ENGL 7465 Folklore

The Concentration has two threads: Multicultural (usually understood to refer to U.S. ethnic literatures); and Transnational (world literatures from regional, national, international, diasporic, colonial/postcolonial, and global perspectives).

ENGL 6340 and ENGL 6360 provide cross-cultural comparative introductions to these two threads, and it is recommended that you take these two courses early in your studies.

ENGL 7350 Seminar in Multicultural and Transnational Literatures pulls the two threads together, again in cross-cultural comparative contexts, and is recommended as a capstone to your course of study.

It is strongly recommended that you take either ENGL 7070 Literary Theory or ENGL 7080 Cultural Studies Theory and Method. The study of theory provides conceptual foundations for the way readers approach texts and for the connection between texts and cultures; and it provides a philosophical basis for the way we approach and conceive of our work as scholars.

Other English courses that mesh especially well with the concentration include:
ENGL 6215 American Literature to 1830
ENGL 6515 Advanced Studies in Children’s Literature (when offered with special emphasis on race and ethnicity in children’s literature)
ENGL 7630 Cultural Rhetoric and Writing

Electives may also include any course in the English program of particular interest or usefulness to you, or courses in other departments such as History, Psychology, Education, Political Science, Foreign Language and Literatures (except FORL 6000) that are especially suited to your research or professional interests, as approved by your MTL advisor and the Graduate Director.

Thesis or Comprehensive Assessment Project Requirement (6 s.h.)

A thesis (6 s.h.) or Comprehensive Assessment Project (CAP) with additional coursework in English (6 s.h.).

A. The Thesis requires 6 s.h. of thesis (ENGL 7000), and is recommended for most students. The MTL faculty believe the thesis is an appropriate capstone experience for the MA, a demonstration of sustained focus on research and writing that familiarizes the student with a larger field of scholarship, providing an indispensable grounding for those who plan to continue their studies in a PhD program. Students are encouraged to begin thinking early about possible topics for their MA Thesis. Each course assignment can be used to explore and discover topics that can be developed into larger, Thesis-length projects. The Thesis option requires a Prospectus Meeting with the Thesis Committee to be conducted within the first three weeks of the semester in which the student plans to complete the Thesis, and an Oral Defense. The Prospectus Meeting and Defense may be conducted by conference call for DE Students. A full description of thesis requirements is provided by the Department of English graduate studies office or e-mail englishgrad@ecu.edu.

B. The Comprehensive Assessment Project option require an additional 6 s.h. of coursework (to replace thesis hours). These can be any appropriate courses in ENGL or another Department, as long as all other requirements for the MA have been met, and 3 of those hours may be a directed reading. (Note: No more than 6 s.h. total taken outside the English Department can count towards the MA.)

  1. The Portfolio option involves:

    A Planning Meeting with a committee of three faculty from the Dept. of English chosen according to procedures outlined for the Thesis Committee. This meeting will be held no later than the third week of classes during the semester in which the student plans to take the Exam. The Planning Meeting may be conducted by conference call for DE students.

    A Portfolio, which includes six to eight representative seminar papers and/or projects, to be presented at the Planning Meeting, and a Reading List of 20 texts, to be agreed on at the Planning Meeting. Ten of these texts will be chosen by the committee and ten by the student with the committee’s approval, in an area of specialization of the student’s choice. Approximately two-thirds of the texts will be book-length, and one-third may be article length.

    A Revised Portfolio, which includes the portfolio papers, edited in accordance with the recommendations of the committee at the Planning Meeting, and a six to eight page Literacy Narrative or Cover Statement that provides a coherent synthesis of the Portfolio papers and contextualizes them within the larger scholarly field represented by the Reading Lists. The Revised Portfolio and the Literacy Narrative will be submitted to the committee no less than two weeks before the Oral Exam is scheduled.

    An Oral Defense meeting of between one and one and one-half hours, during which the student demonstrates mastery of the theoretical and primary texts on the Reading List by discussing with the committee the Portfolio in relationship to the texts on the Reading List. The Defense may be conducted by conference call or video conference for DE students.

  2. The Professional Project option might be chosen by students with professional needs or interests, such as the design of a curriculum, a teaching unit, or other workplace project. The Project requires an additional 6 s.h. hours of coursework and:

    A Planning Meeting, with a committee of three English faculty chosen according to procedures outlined for the Thesis Committee, to be held no later than the third week of classes during the semester in which the student plans to complete the Project. The Planning Meeting may be conducted by e-mail and/or conference call for DE students.

    A Project Outline (2 to 3 pp.) and a Working Bibliography of 20 sources, to be submitted to the committee at the Prospectus Meeting.

    A Framing Essay (5-6 pp.) relating the project to the Bibliography and explaining the theoretical framework of the project and the Project itself (20-25 pp.) to be submitted to the committee no less than two weeks before the Defense is scheduled.

    An Oral Defense (1-1 ½ hrs.), at which the student presents the Project and its theoretical framework to the committee and answers questions posed by the committee related to the problem the project addresses, the methodology used, the utility of the project/application in curriculum or other work environments, and the relationship of the project to the student’s graduate coursework. The Defense may be conducted by conference call or videoconference for DE students. Distance Education students are invited (but not required) to come to campus for the Prospectus/Planning Meeting and/or Defense of the Thesis or CAP (or at any stage of their program) for a more personal exchange with faculty.


Graduate Catalog

Area Coordinator: Dr. Wendy Sharer (sharerw@ecu.edu)

Description

East Carolina University offers a Master of Arts degree in English with a concentration in Rhetoric & Composition. The program synthesizes philosophical, historical, and cultural dimensions of written communication through a wide variety of courses in rhetorical theory, composition pedagogy, discourse analysis, and literacy studies. Many of our graduates secure teaching positions at the community college level, while others find positions as directors of learning or writing centers. Some decide to continue graduate study at the doctoral level. Our program has enjoyed considerable success in placing its graduates in nationally recognized PhD programs.

What do rhetoric and composition specialists do?

Scholars in the field of rhetoric and composition study a wide range of topics related to how writers use language to create effects among diverse audiences and within varying contexts. The kinds of research conducted by specialists in this discipline include:

  • Theoretical and scholarly investigations into the nature of written discourse (electronic/digital and print-based texts).
  • Ethnographic narratives which attempt to understand how texts are produced in a variety of academic and nonacademic settings.
  • Historical studies of the forms and technologies of writing.
  • Pedagogical studies that critically assess methods of teaching writing.
  • Case studies into the composing processes of experienced and inexperienced writers.
  • Rhetorical criticism of literary and other texts.

Coursework and Other Requirements

For questions regarding coursework and other requirements, please contact the area coordinator.

Required Courses (9 s.h.)

ENGL 6625 Teaching Composition: Theory and Practice
ENGL 7615 History and Theory of Rhetoric I or ENGL 7620 History and Theory of Rhetoric II
ENGL 7630 Cultural Rhetoric and Writing

Select two courses from the following (6 s.h.)

ENGL 6000 Critical Writing in English Studies
ENGL 7665 Rhetoric and Composition
ENGL 7950 Issues in Teaching Composition
ENGL 7960 Methods of Teaching English in the Two-Year College
ENGL 7975 Developmental English in the Two-Year College

Required Course (3 s.h.)

Select 3 s.h. from Linguistics, TESOL, or Technical and Professional Communication concentrations.

Thesis or Comprehensive Assessment Project Requirement (6 s.h.)

A thesis, demonstrating the student's ability to gather, arrange, and interpret material which bears on a particular problem (6 s.h.) or a Comprehensive Assessment Project (CAP) with additional coursework in English (6 s.h.).

A Comprehensive Assessment Project (CAP) includes 1) a reading list determined in consultation with a faculty advisor in rhetoric and composition, 2) A portfolio of selected written work from the student’s MA coursework, and 3) an introductory/review essay. The student will present this portfolio, framed with the introductory/review essay, to his or her MA committee for formal review and defense.

Graduate Catalog Area Coordinator: Dr. Michael Aceto (acetom@ecu.edu)

Description

The TESOL concentration in ECU’s English Department prepare professionals for career opportunities in both the public and private sectors, including teaching and training (junior and four-year colleges and English as a Foreign Language overseas), teaching English for Specific Purposes (e.g. language training for foreign-born employees, such as business English), and teaching and training in North Carolina public schools by those who already hold teacher licensure in other areas of expertise, among others.

Delivered by a team of specialists in TESOL, linguistics, discourse analysis, and sociolinguistics, our TESOL curriculum provides comprehensive training that meets the demand for competent professionals in the fields. The TESOL concentration is designed to meet the needs of both working professionals and full-time students, and features both online courses and campus courses.

Our TESOL graduate students help organize the annual ***TALGS (TESOL and Applied Linguistics Graduate Students) conference, which provides graduate students and TESOL/TEFL professionals a forum to showcase their research and teaching practices.

You can contact the area coordinator if you have any questions about required coursework or the program in general. On admission, you will be initially advised by the area coordinator; as your research interests begin to focus, you will choose an advisor in your area of interest.

Coursework and Other Requirements

For questions regarding coursework and other requirements, please contact the area coordinator.

Required courses (9 s.h.)

ENGL 6528 Teaching English as a Second Language: Theories and Principles
ENGL 6530 Descriptive Linguistics
ENGL 6531 TESL: Methods and Practicum

Select three courses from the following (9 s.h.)

ENGL 6505 Linguistic and Cultural History of the English Language
ENGL 6525 Language and Society
ENGL 6526 Structure of English: Phonology and Morphology
ENGL 6527 Structure of English: Syntax and Semantics
ENGL 6529 Applied Linguistics for ESL Teachers
ENGL 6535 Principles of Language Testing
ENGL 6680 Writing Systems of the World
ENGL 7565 Linguistics, Education, and ESL
ENGL 7605 Discourse Analysis

Thesis or Comprehensive Assessment Project (6 s.h.)

A thesis, demonstrating the student's ability to gather, arrange, and interpret material which bears on a particular problem (6 s.h.), or a Comprehensive Assessment Project (CAP) with additional coursework in English (6 s.h.).

A. Thesis Option
The thesis requires 6 s.h. of thesis (ENGL 7000), and is recommended for those who plan to continue their studies in a PhD program. The Thesis option requires a Prospectus meeting with the Thesis Committee and an Oral Defense of the completed Thesis. A full description of thesis requirements is provided in the Master of Arts in English Handbook.

B. The Comprehensive Assessment Project (CAP) with additional coursework in English
The CAP consists of an annotated bibliography and a synthesis paper. When prepared, the student presents the project to the CAP committee during a scheduled exam. Following the presentation, committee members ask questions related to the project. The CAP demonstrates the student’s ability (1) to examine field literature critically and reflectively; and (2) to evaluate the project’s findings in the larger context of knowledge gained through his or her coursework.

For the annotated bibliography, the student chooses a field-related topic of interest, formulates a research question, and finds, through library research, at least twenty sources directly related to his or her research question. The sources consist of current full-length articles published in peer-reviewed journals, book chapters and/or books. Dissertation abstracts are not acceptable. Foundational work on a given topic, regardless of the date of publication, is admissible. All sources have to be approved by the student’s CAP committee before the student begins annotating them. The annotated bibliography follows the APA citation format. It is prefaced by an introduction giving the student’s rationale for the project.

For the synthesis Paper the student writes a cover paper synthesizing the information learned from research. The student clearly shows how this research has informed his or her response to the research question. The student draws conclusions and, where relevant, considers practical implications of his or her findings. The paper is 7-10 pages (cc. 2,000-2,500 words) in length.

Graduate Catalog
Concentration Website

Area Advisor: Dr. Brent Henze (tpc@ecu.edu)
Area Coordinator: Dr. Michael Albers (albersm@ecu.edu)

Description

East Carolina University's online graduate programs in Technical and Professional Communication provide advanced preparation for students seeking careers in technical and professional communication and a variety of related fields requiring communication expertise. Students develop proficiency in technical editing and publishing; communication media and technologies; research design and methodology; teaching and training; communication in specific professional contexts such as healthcare, science, and government; professional writing genres; and many other areas.

Students from a variety of academic backgrounds develop the knowledge and skills to thrive as communicators in industry, academe, and the public sector. Our programs offer practicing communication professionals the opportunity to step back from their everyday tasks to reconsider the technological and conceptual changes that influence their work. Our graduates become public relations specialists, fund-raising and educational outreach professionals, program directors and communication specialists, teachers and trainers, writers in government, and technical communicators in high-tech industries.

Course Work and Other Requirements

For questions regarding coursework and other requirements, please contact the area advisor, Dr. Brent Henze (tpc@ecu.edu).

Required course (3 s.h.)

ENGL 7702 Research Design in Technical and Professional Communication

Select five courses from the following (15 s.h.)

ENGL 6700 Technical Editing and Production
ENGL 6702 Research Methods in Technical and Professional Communication
ENGL 6715 Technical Writing
ENGL 6721 Copyediting in Professional Communication
ENGL 6725 Directed Readings in Technical and Professional Writing
ENGL 6740 Internship in Technical and Professional Communication
ENGL 6741 Internship in Technical and Professional Communication
ENGL 7705 Ethical Issues in Professional Communication
ENGL 7710 Professional Communication
ENGL 7712 Grant and Proposal Writing
ENGL 7716 Classics in Scientific and Technical Literature
ENGL 7721 Managing Editing and Publication Processes
ENGL 7730 Issues in Technical Communication
ENGL 7745 Teaching Professional Communication
ENGL 7746 Training in Professional Communication
ENGL 7750 Writing Public Science
ENGL 7765 Technical and Professional Communication*
ENGL 7766 Special Studies Seminars in Communication and Emerging Technologies**
ENGL 7780 Theory of Professional Communication
ENGL 7785 History of Professional Communication
ENGL 7790 Public Interest Writing

*ENGL 7765 may be completed or a maximum of 9 s.h. with different topics.
**ENGL 7766 may be completed up to two times with different topics.

Thesis or Comprehensive Assessment Project Requirement (6 s.h.)

A thesis, demonstrating the student's ability to gather, arrange, and interpret material which bears on a particular problem (6 s.h.), or a Comprehensive Assessment Project (CAP) with additional coursework in English (6 s.h.).

Note: Up to 9 hours of non-degree courses may be counted automatically; 6 additional hours may be counted (for a total of 15 hours) for students officially in the Certificate in Professional Communication with approval. Transfer courses will be considered in accordance with the ECU Graduate School transfer credit policy.

*program offered online

Admission of applicants outside the State of North Carolina to an online degree, certificate, or individual online course offered by East Carolina University is dependent on ECU's ability to secure authorization from the applicant's state of residence, if such authorization is required.

East Carolina University delivers online education programs and courses throughout the United States and internationally. All programs have been approved by the University of North Carolina General Administration. Many states have prescribed an authorization process for out-of-state institutions delivering online programs to its state residents to ensure quality post-secondary education, to preserve the integrity of an academic degree, and to instill greater consumer protection for its student citizens.

East Carolina University has taken steps to protect its students and programs through nationwide compliance by: participating in the National Council for State Authorization Reciprocity Agreements (NC-SARA); obtaining authorization, approval, exemptions, and waivers; or confirming that East Carolina University can operate without such authorization because the state's laws do not pertain to a public institution, to an accredited institution, or to ECU's activities in that state.

On November 14, 2016, East Carolina University was approved by the National Council for State Authorization Reciprocity Agreements (NC-SARA) and the NC State Education Assistance Authority (NCSEAA) to participate in NC-SARA, which is a voluntary, regional/national approach to state oversight of postsecondary distance education. Institutions that participate in SARA are authorized to provide online education to students from all SARA member states. States and institutions that choose to become members of or participate in SARA operate under a set of policies and standards overseen by SARA and administered by the four nationally recognized regional higher education compacts.