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Welcome to Neuroscience!

Dr. Tuan Tran
Neuroscience Program Director
Office: Rawl Building, Room 225
Email: trant@ecu.edu or neuroscience@ecu.edu
Faculty Webpage: www.ecu.edu/psyc/trant


Neuroscience is a discipline primed for the challenges affecting human health within the 21st century. It provides better understanding of brain function through cutting-edge research and clinical practice. Numerous inquiries about how the brain works date back to the dawn of civilization, however, this academic discipline is still in its infancy. Explaining the brain-behavior relationship is a central tenet which has been described as one of the last frontiers in the biological sciences by renowned neuroscientist and Nobel Prize Winner, Dr. Eric Kandel. It is challenging, exciting, rewarding, and interdisciplinary.

We offer an undergraduate major (leading to BA or BS degrees) and minor that are concentrations in the Multidisciplinary Studies Program. This program is housed in the Department of Psychology and is 1 of 19 interdisciplinary studies concentrations within Thomas Harriott College of Arts and Sciences. The concentration is designed to provide students with knowledge and research skills that will help prepare them for a career in diverse neuroscience areas (psychopharmacology, neuropsychology, neurophysiology, neurotoxicology, neuropathology, and many more!) and a wide variety of related fields such as medicine, dentistry, and other health-related professions. Indeed, many of the course requirements in the curriculum overlap with the undergraduate courses required by most graduate schools and medical schools. The curriculum includes a strong core of biology, chemistry, physics, and psychology courses, mentored-research experience in scientific laboratories, a two-semester senior thesis, a two-semester senior capstone sequence, and diverse electives (spanning those disciplines). For prospective students, we encourage you to learn more about the program, our contributing research faculty, students, and their achievements. For our alumni, we appreciate your passion for neuroscience and please keep in touch! I look forward to hearing from you.


Neuroscience News

  • White matter connectome with cortical lesion map clarifies temporal auditory comprehension
    A new reports a novel mapping methodology adapted for stroke brains. Researchers combined connectome-lesion symptom mapping with traditional voxel-based cortical lesion symptom mapping to assess brain networks supporting auditory comprehension. Results confirm the middle, inferior and posterior temporal regions are the most important for speech comprehension and shed light on potential contributions of temporal lobe network connections in understanding spoken language.
  • Surgeons study 'awake aneurysm surgery' for better outcomes
    Researchers are encouraged by study results that they hope can reduce the risks associated with brain surgery for aneurysm where the patient is awake.

NeuroscienceNews.com

  • Voter Behavior Influenced by Hot Weather
    A new study reveals temperature may influence voter behavior. Researchers note increases in state temperatures between elections are related to increased voter turn out and support for the incumbent party. Additionally, higher temperatures motivated some to vote for smaller political parties.
  • Why Teens Take Risks: It’s Not a Deficit in Brain Development
    Researchers report it might not be slowed prefrontal cortex development that drives teens to embark in risky behavior, as some common theories state. Instead, they argue, teens may make risky decisions as a means of experience building so they are better equipped at making important decisions later in life.