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Eastern Carolina Chapter of the Society for Neuroscience


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For correspondence, please contact the Council Secretary:

Sonja Bareiss, Ph.D., PT
College of Allied Health Sciences
Health Sciences Building, 2505G
Greenville, NC 27858

Phone: 252.744.6243
Email: bareisss@ecu.edu



Mission

  1. Advance the understanding of the brain and the nervous system by bringing together scientists of diverse backgrounds, by facilitating the integration of research directed at all levels of biological organization, and by encouraging translational research and the application of new scientific knowledge to develop improved disease treatments and cures.

  2. Provide professional development activities, information, and educational resources for neuroscientists at all stages of their careers, including undergraduates, graduates, and post doctoral fellows, and increase participation of scientists from a diversity of cultural and ethnic backgrounds.

  3. Promote public information and general education about the nature of scientific discovery and the results and implications of the latest neuroscience research. Support active and continuing discussions on ethical issues relating to the conduct and outcomes of neuroscience research.

  4. Inform legislators and other policy makers about new scientific knowledge and recent developments in neuroscience research and their implications for public policy, societal benefit, and continued scientific progress.

  5. In addition, the purpose of the Eastern Carolina Chapter is 1) to provide a forum for the exchange of ideas and information and ideas between East Carolina-area neuroscientists; and 2) through community outreach, to offer educational resources and opportunities for teachers, students and the public in general.
Membership in the Eastern Carolina Chapter shall be open to:
  1. Any person holding advanced degree(s) residing in the State of North Carolina that conducts basic research or  performs clinical and/or medical work in neuroscience or its related fields (Regular Membership).
  2. Any student enrolled in programs at degree-granting institutions of higher education within North Carolina (Student Membership).
  3. Any person interested in the neurosciences but not available for regular or student membership (Affiliate) as defined in the bylaws of SFN.

For more information and application, please click here.

The Neuroscience chapter also assists its members and invited speakers by applying for and obtaining:
  1. Travel grants for graduate students and postdoctoral fellows to attend the Society for Neuroscience meeting.
  2. The Grass Traveling Scientist Award, which enables local chapters to host leading neuroscientists at their institutions.
  3. SFN Chapter Grants (from $500 to $2000) that support and encourage chapter activities.
  4. Foundation grants that support chapter activities and host leading neuroscientists.
 

Neuroscience News -- ScienceDaily

  • Training your brain to prefer healthy foods
    It may be possible to train the brain to prefer healthy low-calorie foods over unhealthy higher-calorie foods, according to new research.
  • How neurons in bats' brains ensure a safe flight
    Bats emit ultrasound pulses and measure the echoes reflected from their surroundings. They have an extremely flexible internal navigation system that enables them to do this. A study shows that when a bat flies close to an object, the number of active neurons in the part of a bat's brain responsible for processing acoustic information about spatial positioning increases. This information helps bats to react quickly and avoid obstacles.
  • Neurons in human skin perform advanced calculations
    Neurons in human skin perform advanced calculations, previously believed that only the brain could perform. A characteristic of neurons that extend into the skin and record touch, is that they branch in the skin so that each neuron reports touch from many highly-sensitive zones on the skin. According to researchers, this branching allows first-order tactile neurons not only to send signals to the brain that something has touched the skin, but also process geometric data about the object touching the skin.