East Carolina University. Tomorrow starts here.®
 
Department of Literacy Studies, English Education, and History Education
Journal of Curriculum and Instruction (JoCI)




 
About JoCI
JoCI Published Issues
Journal of Curriculum and Instruction
Current Call for Manuscripts
Submission Guidelines
Archives
Contact JoCI
Accessing the Journal
Past Call for Manuscripts


Open Theme
Flyer in PDF

The editors of the Journal of Curriculum and Instruction welcome manuscripts that address topics related to current trends in curriculum and instruction in Pre K-12 teaching and learning. Manuscripts submitted to JoCI should make a unique contribution to the knowledge base and be current, innovative, and applicable to the Pre K-12 environment. Manuscripts should be original, coherent, and understandable.



Theme Issue: Publication June 2013

Behavior Supports for All Learners

This issue will focus on supporting students with behavioral challenges in PreK-12th grade to insure academic and social success for all. Suggested topics for research studies and practitioner articles include: school wide systems for promoting positive behavior; evidence-based strategies for whole-class or individual students; collaboration of general education teachers and special education teachers to support students with disabilities in inclusive settings; including diverse families in home-school programs; and connections between positive behavioral support and academic achievement. 


Theme Issue: Publication May 2012

Diversity and Global Learning

While courts decide the legality of federal and state immigration policies, public schools across the United States face an increasingly diverse population of students in their classrooms. Finding ways to address the needs of culturally and linguistically diverse learners in Pre K-12 schools is a challenge for many educators, but being a 21st century teacher in a linguistically and culturally diverse classroom also creates opportunities to be a major catalyst for social change. As educators preparing students for our global society, we need to address diverse forms of exploration, analysis and knowledge representation; promote respect for diverse people; and seek mutually beneficial relationships among diverse communities.

The Diversity and Global Learning issue of the Journal of Curriculum and Instruction (JoCI) focuses on the efforts of educators to implement diverse instruction and global learning programs, strategies, and p9olicies, which address the needs of all learners in Pre K-12 educational systems. For this issue of JoCI, we seek articles pertaining to the overarching theme of "Diversity and Global Learning," including, for instance, articles on effective pedagogical practices in diverse settings, instructional strategies for students learning English as a second language, technology integration in a global learning environment, and diverse curriculum integration.




Themed issue: Publication May 2011
Preparing Students with 21st Century ICT Literacy in Math and Science Education

Information and Communication Technology (ICT) literacy encompasses the ability to use technology to develop content knowledge and skills in support of 21st century teaching and learning. A society that lacks a workforce with ICT literacy is not equipped to compete in today's global economy because these skills are essential to the development of effective citizens, workers, and leaders. In an increasingly digital and global learning landscape, determining effective ways to use technology to enhance teaching and learning in the areas of mathematics and science is critical. This issue of the Journal of Curriculum and Instruction focuses on the design and development of digital-age learning experiences in mathematics and science education at both the PreK-12 and teacher education levels. Articles are sought describing practices and strategies as well as research results and challenges. Of interest is the intersection between ICT literacy and mathematics and science education. Other articles might identify barriers to the use of specific technologies in practice.

 


Open Theme

The editors of the Journal of Curriculum and Instruction welcome manuscripts that address topics related to current trends in curriculum and instruction in Pre K-12 teaching and learning. Manuscripts submitted to JoCI should make a unique contribution to the knowledge base and be current, innovative, and applicable to the Pre K-12 environment. Manuscripts should be original, coherent, and understandable.



Themed Issue - Publication May 2010

Recruiting and Retaining Teachers in High-Need Content and Geographic Areas

  Guest Editor: Barnett Berry, Center for Teaching Quality

Over the last several decades education researchers have concluded that recruiting high-quality teachers is one of the most powerful in-school factors related to the improvement of student achievement. However, while teacher shortages continue to grow (especially in the areas of math, science, special education, and the teaching of English Language Learners), little consensus exists among researchers and policymakers on how to best recruit and retain quality teachers — especially in high-need rural and urban schools. Debates are waged over whether the emphasis of training new recruits should be on fostering the right dispositions, teaching subject matter content or extensive pedagogical training. Additional debates involve the role of financial incentives and performance pay in enticing talent to the teaching profession. Of late several school districts are rethinking their approaches to the strategic management of human capital — with many of them de-emphasizing the role of university-based teacher education programs as the source of training new teachers for high-need schools.

This issue of the Journal of Curriculum and Instruction (JoCI) focuses on the role of teacher recruitment and retention in high-need content and geographic areas. Determining effective teacher recruitment and retention practices is critical in meeting educational needs and assuring students are making appropriate educational progress. Articles are sought describing practices and strategies that hold promise for ensuring successful recruitment, preparation, and retention of teachers in high-need areas. Other articles might identify critical barriers related to both policy and/or practice. Additionally, articles focusing on the role of teacher education, both traditional and alternative, in the recruitment and retention of highly qualified teachers in high-need areas are welcome.


-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Themed Issue - Publication July 2009
Transformative Leadership
Guest Editor: James O. McDowelle, East Carolina University

Transformative approaches to leadership challenge assumptions about traditional, hierarchical leadership models. Within transformative educational settings, all stakeholders (students, parents, teachers, staff, and administrators) are empowered as potential leaders charged with working collaboratively in the best interest of everyone involved. Transformative leadership offers the possibility for uniting educators in working toward a shared vision that can potentially improve both teaching and learning, especially in an educational environment in which high-stakes student and teacher accountability is considered paramount by policymakers and administrators.

The fifth issue of the Journal of Curriculum and Instruction (JoCI) focuses on the role of transformative leadership as a new paradigm for twenty-first century schools. Articles are sought describing transformative leadership theory and process, the resulting impacts or changes in educational practice and policy, and proactive examples of such leadership in our schools. The active involvement of teachers, community and business partnerships and civic leaders who collaboratively contribute to the vision and mission of schools may serve as examples of transformative school leadership. Other articles might address strategies for implementing and evaluating transformative leadership efforts, or describe the successes of and/or barriers to fostering transformative leadership. Additionally, articles focusing on instructional approaches that successfully cultivate transformative leadership in both school leader education and professional development are welcome.



Themed Issue-Publication January 2009
Using Action Research to Improve Educational Practices

Guest Editor: Cher Hendricks, University of West Georgia

Twenty-first century educators work in a political climate that stresses increased student learning outcomes and the implementation of scientifically-based practices. Determining effective school-based practices is critical in meeting these expectations and assuring students are making appropriate educational progress. Action research has the potential to be a powerful change agent encouraging educators to more fully investigate and consider possible solutions for real-world problems. Educators engaged in action research efforts not only identify specific areas of inquiry and systematically examine possible alternatives, but they also enhance their practitioner knowledge and improve student learning. Action research empowers educators as decision-makers and self-regulated professionals.

The fourth issue of the Journal of Curriculum and Instruction (JoCI) focuses on the role of action research in professional development and how it may result in improved educational practices. Articles are sought describing the action research process and examples of action research conducted within schools. Other articles might address strategies for implementing and evaluating action research, or describe the successes and/or barriers to conducting action research in classrooms including ethical, time management, methodological, research design, and data analysis issues. Additionally, articles focusing on effective instruction about action research in teacher education and professional development are welcome. 



Themed Issue-Publication July 2008
Addressing the Needs of All Learners


Guest Editors: K. Lynne Harper Mainzer, Johns Hopkins  University
Richard Mainzer, Council for Exceptional Children


The increasingly diverse population of students served in Pre K-12 schools affords unique learning opportunities for both teachers and students; yet, schools are impacted by the growing federal requirements perceived by some to narrow the curriculum, such as No Child Left Behind, as well as those that require access to the curriculum for all students, such as the Individuals with Disabilities Education Improvement Act. Finding ways to address the needs of all learners, including students who are gifted and talented, English language learners, culturally diverse, as well as students with disabilities, can sometimes challenge the educational system.

The third issue of the Journal of Curriculum & Instruction (JoCI) focuses on the efforts of educators to implement strategies and policies that address the needs of all learners in the Pre K-12 educational system. Articles are sought describing effective pedagogical practices including differentiated instruction, strategy instruction, technology integration, universal design, curriculum integration, peer mentoring, multi-level texts, and other practices focused on all learners. Other related articles of interest might potentially address professional standards for preparing teachers, curriculum standards and the student spectrum, access to the general curriculum, the role of evidence-based practices in educational reform and other articles related to the overarching theme of "Addressing the Needs of All Learners."



Themed Issue-Publication January 2008

Social Studies Teaching & Learning: Preparing Citizens for a Global Society

 

Social studies is the curriculum earmarked to nurture citizenship; advocate cultural awareness and understanding; promote justice, tolerance, and democratic ideals; and prepare young people for informed and active participation in an increasingly interdependent global community. Achieving these curricular goals is essential if students are expected to make significant and mutually beneficial contributions within a globalized society; yet, because the current No Child Left Behind legislation has not included the teaching of social studies in its national accountability system, some states have chosen not to include social studies assessment in their statewide testing programs resulting in a de facto de-emphasis of social studies teaching and learning. Other states include social studies in their statewide testing program, oftentimes resulting in a greater emphasis on social studies and improvement in instructional methodology as teachers make greater efforts to teach for understanding.

 

The second issue of the Journal of Curriculum & Instruction (JoCI) focuses on the efforts of social studies educators to implement strategies that promote civic competence and successfully encourage the teaching and learning of social studies within a global society. Articles are sought describing effective pedagogical methods in the social studies including curriculum integration, teacher valuing, service learning, relevant technology implementation, as well as student self-efficacy and critical analysis of both current and historical issues. Other related articles of interest might potentially address advocacy efforts to influence public and policymakers' perceptions about the importance of social studies, as well as articles related to the overarching theme of "preparing citizens for a global society."
 

Themed Issue for Summer 2007

 Literacy: Best Practices in an Age of High-Stakes Assessment


Single test scores are increasingly used as individual measures of how teachers and schools perform across the United States. Meanwhile, professional organizations, such as the International Reading Association (1999), caution that testing and accountability should not be used as means for "controlling instruction", but as a means for "gathering information to help students become better readers". The inaugural issue of the Journal of Curriculum & Instruction (JoCI) focuses on the efforts of educators to implement meaningful literacy instruction within Pre K-12 school classrooms in the midst of mounting emphasis on high-stakes testing and accountability in America's schools.

 

Articles are sought describing the impact of high-stakes assessment on literacy teaching and learning as related to teaching quality, student motivation, teacher self-efficacy, educational policymaking, public/parental perceptions, best practice implementation, individualization, and "lessons learned". Case studies involving the progress of individual students and the quality of instructional programs are welcomed, as well as other articles related to the overarching theme of "Literacy: Best Practices in an Age of High-Stakes Assessment."