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Biomechanics Lab - Projects

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    Current Projects:


    "Knee Joint Forces in Relation to Ground Surface Stiffness during Running.” Price, V., DeVita, P. (2017)


    The purpose of this study is to compare tibio-femoral and patello-femoral joint contact forces while running on different surfaces of varying hardness. We hypothesize that varying the ground stiffness would not make a significant difference to the force placed on the knee across different ground stiffness levels due to the joint manipulating itself to maintain the body’s natural running mechanics.


    "The relationships between physical capacity and biomechanical plasticity with age during level and incline walking." Kuhman, D., DeVita, P. (2017)


    Elderly compared to young adults exhibit an age-associated biomechanical plasticity characterized by increased hip and decreased ankle joint contributions to mechanical work while walking. Previous research suggests that low capacity compared to high capacity elderly adults exhibit an increased magnitude of this biomechanical plasticity. The purpose of this study is to examine the relationships between physical capacity and age-associated biomechanical plasticity during level and incline walking. We expect to observe an inverse relationship between physical capacity and biomechanical capacity. More specifically, as physical capacity decreases, hip joint contributions to mechanical work will increase and ankle joint contributions to mechanical work will decrease.


    "A Biomechanical and Metabolic Comparison of Skipping and Running.” McDonnell, J., DeVita, P. (2016)


    Locomotion comparison between skipping and running gaits. It appears that skipping may provide greater aerobic and cardiovascular training than running and it may provide this benefit while creating lower skeletal loads than running. Hmmm, that’s pretty interesting. We are comparing locomotion biomechanics including knee and Achilles tendon loads and metabolic cost while skipping and running at the same speed. Suppose skipping were to have these advantages?  We wonder if people would incorporate some amount of skipping in their total training program. Interesting idea.


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