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Building Histories 

Table of Contents

A. J. Fletcher Music Center

Other names
Music Building
Built
1966
Construction cost
$1.25 million
Gross sq. ft.
58,950
Assignable sq. ft.
40,491
Architects
A.G. Odell Jr. & Associates
Namesake
A. J. Fletcher (1887-1979), a native of Ashe County, NC, graduated from Wake Forest Law School. He became a prominent North Carolina attorney, businessman, philanthropist, and patron of the arts and music. He served as editor of the Mooresville Enterprise and Apex Journal. Fletcher was the founder of the National Opera Company in 1948 and WRAL in 1939. He established the Tobacco Radio Network and was prominent throughout America for his contributions to broadcasting.
History
The building was dedicated on May 16, 1971 and is located on the eastern edge of campus near Tenth Street. It is composed of three units. These units contain lobbies, lounges, 9 classrooms, 35 studios, and 96 practice rooms. In addition there are band and choral rehearsal rooms, a recital hall, music, tape and record libraries and a conference room. The exterior of the building consists of concrete block and brick cavity walls.
Additions
1998-The Recital Hall was renovated. Things included in this were new acoustical properties, new stage and house lighting, and a warm-up space encompassing the dressing room and backstage restroom areas.
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Austin Building, New

Built
1964
Construction cost
$970,000
Gross sq. ft.
63,110
Assignable sq. ft.
39,577
Architects
A.J. Maxwell Jr., Goldsboro, NC
Namesake
Herbert E. Austin (1866-1929), a graduate of Worcester Polytechnic Institute in Massachusetts, taught at ECTTS as a professor of Science and Geography from 1909 to 1929 and was the school's acting dean. He was a charter member of the faculty.
History
The "New" Austin building was constructed on the former college baseball field, just east of Rawl Building. The three-story, concrete, brick, and steel building contains 40 classrooms, 60 faculty offices and two seminar rooms. A computer center for a mainframe computer is housed in Austin. Remote terminals in the other campus buildings are connected to the mainframe computer for purposes of registration, student financial records, research, and student training. It also contains the Mathematics Department.
Additions
1965 - The Arthur D. Frank Seminar room was dedicated on the third floor. Dr. Frank joined the faculty in September 1924 and was chair of the Social Studies department until his retirement in November 1957.

1969 - ECU Chimes were installed in Austin. The chimes were a gift to the university from the Class of 1969 and played the Alma Mater at noon each day. The chimes have since been removed from the building.

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Austin Building, Original

Other names
Administration
Built
1908/09
Razed
1968
Construction cost
$32,538, bid
Gross sq. ft.
75,200
Architects
Hook & Rogers, Charlotte, NC
Namesake
Herbert E. Austin (1866-1929), a graduate of Worcester Polytechnic Institute in Massachusetts, taught at ECTTS as a professor of Science and Geography from 1909 to1929 and was the school's acting dean. He was a charter member of the faculty.
History
One of the four original buildings of the East Carolina Teachers Training School. "Old" Austin housed classrooms, an auditorium, a library, meeting rooms, and administrative offices during the early years of East Carolina. The east wing was added in 1914; the west wing and rear sections were completed in 1922. The west wing was described in the first issue of the East Carolina Teachers College News:
The additions to the Administration Building provide for a library, a gymnasium, a small assembly hall, a book-room, sleeping quarters for the Alumnae visitors, a sewing department, an enlarged cooking laboratory, several additional class rooms, offices, practice rooms for music.
In 1920 the Student Government Association was formed. The group's constitution calls for an "Administration Building Committee," which oversaw student conduct while in Austin. The building was the focal point of the campus until it was demolished to make way for the Jenkins Fine Arts Center. An attempt was made to save the cupola of the building. Click here for more information regarding the cupola and the original Austin Building.
Additions
1914 - East Wing, Hook & Rogers (Charlotte NC) & H.W. Simpson (New Bern NC) 1920 - Training School Quarterly, Volume 8, 1920, p. 90:
A number of changes were made in the administration building. The basement was finished and made into a new post office, new stationery room, three classrooms, storage room, and a vault. What was the library was divided into two parts: The secretary's office and the private office of the president. As you come in the door to the administration building, to your right is a small reception room. The library is now in what was the history room, classroom number 4, which is on the northwest corner of the building. The entrance to the administration building was enlarged, greating improving and making the hall very spacious.
1922 - West Wing, H.A. Underwood (Raleigh NC)
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Aycock Dormitory

Other names
none
Built
1960
Construction cost
$1.1 million
Gross sq. ft.
89,516
Assignable sq. ft.
69,239
Architects
Eric Flannagan, Henderson NC
Namesake
Charles Brantley Aycock (1859-1912): Perhaps the greatest tribute to Charles Brantley Aycock is not that he was Governor from 1901 to 1905. The fact that he is almost universally admitted to have been "the best loved North Carolinian of his generation" is a tribute he would much more highly prized.

The statistical facts about him may be briefly summarized. He was born November 1, 1859, on a Wayne County farm. His parents were plain people, but ambitious, industrious, and independent. His father was for eight years clerk of the court, and in 1864-65, an outstanding member of the North Carolina State Senate.

Young Aycock was educated at the Wilson Collegiate Institute and the Joseph H. Foy School in Kinston, and later distinguished himself as a debater at the University of North Carolina. Admitted to the bar in 1881, he was thereafter almost equally known as an outstanding attorney and as a leader in the State Democratic campaigns.

In 1900, he was elected Governor. Both in his pre-election campaign and through his whole term as Governor and afterward he became the foremost North Carolina champion of "universal education." Even earlier as a member fo the Goldsboro school board he had faced the problems of local education. "Public schools must be provided," he insisted, "for both races and equally for poor children and wealthier." This cause, which won him national fame as the State's "Educational Governor," still had the foremost place in his interests when he died suddenly from a heart attack while addressing the Alabama Educational Association in Birmingham April 4, 1912. Most fittingly there is carved upon his monument in Raleigh the words he had written for an address in which he had planned ot announce a few days later his candidacy for the United States Senate:

Equal! That is the word! On that word I plant
myself and my party -- to the equal right of
every child born on earth to have the opportunity
to burgeon out all that there is within him!
Information copied from Aycock dedication program in CH1050, Series 3, Sub-series 6, Chancellor's Administrative File.
History
The second dormitory built on "the Hill," Aycock houses 520 students and contains 90,000 square feet. The H-shaped building was designed with brick exterior walls and concrete block interior walls, and was originally built as a strictly male residence hall. It features a small recreation center in the basement, the only residence hall to do so.
Additions
1970 - interior painting, Lan-way Coating Company

1989 - $314,500 refurbishing project approved

1993 - $331,500 spent on reroofing and $70,000 spent on installation of fluorescent light fixtures

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Belk Dormitory

Built
1966
Construction cost
$1,378,291
Gross sq. ft.
90,152
Assignable sq. ft.
73,924
Architects
Dudley & Shoe, Greenville, NC. See Manuscript Collection regarding this firm's records.
Namesake
Henry Belk (1898-1972), a North Carolina native, received a B.A. Degree from Trinity College (now Duke University) in 1923. In 1926 Belk became the managing editor for the Goldsboro news, and earned wide respect as a journalist. The Goldsboro News later merged with the Goldsboro Argus to become the Goldsboro News-Argus for which he was also managing editor and later editor. Belk was partially blind and served on the President's Committee for the Employment of the Physically Handicapped (1960) He was very active in state and local civic activities. Belk served as a trustee of ECU (1945-1973) and was Chairman of the Board of Trustees from 1963 to 1964.
History
Belk Dormitory is located on the south end of College Drive in the vicinity of Scott, Aycock and Jones dormitories. The building is four stories high, including three major wings connected by covered passages and stair towers. Five hundred and eight men can live in the dormitory.
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Blount House

Other names
Public Safety, Traffic & Information Center
Built
1945
Gross sq. ft.
3,394
Assignable sq. ft.
2,578
Namesake
Margaret Lee Little Blount (1900-1982) bought the house from W. G. Glass, a local tobacco farmer, in 1946. Upon her death in 1982, it was passed to her husband, Ferrell Leighton Blount (1894-1982), and upon his death, to their children. Mr. Blount and his brothers Marvin Key Blount and Judson H. Blount and their father, Marion O. Blount founded Blount Fertilizer Co. and Carolina Dairies in Greenville.
History
This house located at 609 E. Tenth Street, was built circa 1945. In October 1984 ECU bought Blount House from the children of Margaret and F. L. Blount. It is located next to the Garrett House Computer Center Annex and contained ECU's Public Safety Headquarters which moved from the Howard House in late 1984. A lot of maintenance and renovation work was undertaken on the house. This white columned house is one of several homes that ECU has acquired with state money in past years; although only a few were actually restored for use. The ECU Police Department currently occupies the building.
Additions
Shortly after acquisition in 1984, ECU added an extension off of the left side of the building for office space and the garage was closed off and now used for a maintenance repair room.
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Blount Recreation Sports Complex

Built
1998
Construction cost
$1.7 million
Architects
Larry Zucchino and Patton, Zucchino & Associates, Raleigh, NC
Namesake
William Gray and Barbara Keck Blount, both alumni of ECU, donated the land for the sports facilities. The building was dedicated on November 18, 1998.
History
Located behind Carol Belk Building on Charles Boulevard, the 21 field intramural sports complex has fine Bermuda grass, which has 10 football fields, 6 soccer fields, 5 softball fields, a ropes challenge course, and a field house for intramural use. Some fields are lit for use in the evenings, including 8 football and soccer fields and 4 softball fields. All fields must be reserved whether used for day or night activities. Approximately 300-500 students use the field each week for recreational purposes.

Funding for the Blount Recreation Sports Complex will come from student fees and donations. The Blount Family donated a large portion of land valued at $706,000 in which this facility is built on.

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Bloxton House/Ledonia Wright African-American Cultural Center

Other names
Adelaide E. Bloxton Home Management House, Home Management
Built
1952
Construction cost
$86,490
Gross sq. ft.
3,712
Assignable sq. ft.
2,589
Architects
James W. Griffith, Greenville, NC
Namesake
Adelaide E. Bloxton (1886-1950), native of Nansemond County, Virginia, was a B.S. undergraduate at the college of William and Mary, and a M.S. graduate at Columbia University. Bloxton also studied at the University of Tennessee and the University of North Carolina. Before coming to ECU, she was at one time connected with the Home Life School at Appomatox, Virginia and served as city supervisor and teacher of home economics at Danville, Virginia. She taught Home Economics at ECU (1927-1928) and then became the Director of the Department (1928-1950). In this capacity she was allowed to live in the Home Economics house and it was here that she died in 1950. In addition to her duties as teacher and department chair, she acted as Dean of Women during the 1930 summer term and served on numerous committees.

Ledonia S. Wright was born January 5, 1930 and received her masters degree in education from Shaw University. She became an associate professor with the department of Community Health at ECU in 1974 while working on her Ph.D. in Education from UNC Chapel Hill. She was also the faculty advisor for the Society of United Liberal Students (S.O.U.L.S.) until her sudden death in 1976.

History
In 1952 a home management house was built for the Home Economics Department between Erwin and Garrett.

Bloxton House was dedicated on February 26, 1953. Bloxton House, along with Erwin Hall which was built just east of it, were constructed on the western campus. It was a wooded area at the time, located behind the since demolished Wilson Dormitory.

It is a simple two-story brick structure, originally housing a training facility for Home Economic students. The building also housed the Center for Career Placement and as of the late sixties, contains the Ledonia Wright African-American Culture Center. In 1976 it was rechristened the Ledonia S. Wright Cultural Center following the death of the popular and respected professor of Social Work.

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Brewster Building

Other names
Classroom Building, Social Sciences Building
Built
1970
Construction cost
$2,739,443
Gross sq. ft.
126,666 total
Assignable sq. ft.
80,013 total
Architects
Jesse M. Page & Associates, Raleigh, NC
Namesake
Lawrence Fay Brewster (1907-1999) was educated in the public schools of New York and New Jersey. His undergraduate studies were conducted at William and Mary College, and his graduate studies at Princeton and Columbia Universities. In 1932 he received his M.A., and later a Ph.D. at Duke University (1942). For two years he held positions at Cranleigh School for Boys in St. Petersburg, Florida. He was a research editor for the North Carolina Historical Survey and for one year taught history at Clemson College. After serving at Duke University for four years, he joined the department of Social Studies at ECU as an instructor (1945). During his 25 years at ECU, Brewster initiated the Graduate Program in History, was director of Graduate Studies in History, and was a Fulbright Advisor.

Dr. Brewster held memberships in a number of organizations including Phi Beta Kappa, Phi Kappa phi, Pi Gamma Mu, American Historical Association, Southern Historical Association and the South Carolina Historical Association.

After his retirement, Brewster's commitment to ECU was still strong. He established the Lawrence F. Brewster Graduate Fellowship in History and the History Endowment Fund. Later he established the Lawrence F. Brewster Fund in the Department of History, in which each year three outstanding graduate students in history receive Brewster Fellowships.

History
Brewster Building was dedicated on January 20, 1974. The building is located on the north side of East Tenth Street. Built during the 60's, a turbulent campus political period, it was designed to provide an exit from each floor onto a courtyard. The building was built as a fortress around an O-shaped courtyard and consists of four units referred to as A, B, C, and D. The windows have small slits in them so that no one can climb in or out and the windows also have stone shutters so that no one can see in or out unless they are right in front of them. The staircases were built so that they concealed themselves from the outside of the building. It also has a generator that can support the whole building and the metal gates can be lowered quickly to shut anyone from the outside out. The exterior of the structure is built from face brick cavity walls with concrete block backup at areas B, C, and D. Brewster Building currently contains the departments of History, Geography, Philosophy, Political Science, Sociology, and Economics.
Additions
1965 - Dedication of the A.D. Frank Seminar room in the History Department
1993 - Reroofed building
July 1994- Landscape work done around building
1998- Masonry repair $19,500
1998- Air conditioner repairs
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Brody Medical Sciences

Built
1979
Construction cost
$26 million
Gross sq. ft.
476,329
Assignable sq. ft.
451,000
Namesake
In 1979 the ECU Board of Trustees voted to name the School of Medicine's future home the Brody Medical Sciences Building in recognition of the Brody family's generous support. The family had given $1.5 million to the school, the largest private give received by the university at the time. In 1972, three months into the medical program, the family established an endowment for the Brody Professorship.
History
After six years of planning, construction on the building began in 1979 and was completed in 1981. The Brody Medical Sciences Building was dedicated October 29, 1982. It is a nine story square building with a central 2nd floor open plaza. The building allowed the School of Medicine to consolidate most of it's teaching facilities into one area for the first time.

A typical floor includes 44,5000 square feet of space which is shared by two departments and has laboratories and seminar areas that departments use jointly in teaching programs. Each floor also has two private conference rooms. Clinics and administrative offices are located on the ground floor along with the William E. Laupus Health Sciences Library. Also located on the first floor is a 508 seat auditorium which can be divided into two or three halls. Seminar rooms and four 98 seat lecture halls occupy the second floor. A "floating floor" in the anatomy department on the seventh floor is designed to eliminate vibration for electron microscopes. The gross anatomy lab is housed on the eighth floor.

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Career Services Building

Other names
President's Home
Built
1914
Construction cost
$6,500
Gross sq. ft.
6,572
Assignable sq. ft.
2,790
Architects
Hook & Rogers, Charlotte, NC
History
The two-story frame bungalow was built to house East Carolina's presidents. The Robert Herring Wright family moved into the home circa 1914. The family lived in Jarvis Dormitory prior to this time.

The building has been altered and the porch and carport were added. After the purchase of the Dail House in 1949 to be used for the home of future chief executives, the President's Home was converted into use as faculty apartments and later as dormitory space for eighteen female students. It housed the Personnel Offices from 1977 until 1993 when space was made available at 120 Reade Street. Career Services moved into the building in 1994 after renovations took place and they are still currently housed in this building.

Additions
Ca. 1925 - porch and carport added
1956 - plumbing and electrical improvements
1993 & 1994 - extensive renovations
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Carol Belk Building

Other names
Allied Health Professionals Building
Built
1972
Construction cost
$1,133,748
Gross sq. ft.
49,567
Assignable sq. ft.
32,642
Architects
William F. Freeman Associates, High Point, NC
Namesake
Carol G. Belk and her husband Irwin, of Charlotte North Carolina,have been long time contributors to ECU. Together they started the Belk Foundation that has benefitted many ECU students as well as students at other North Carolina schools. In 1997, Irwin Belk received an honorary degree from ECU. These extraordinary people have done many other things that have showed their support of ECU. In March 2000, they gave a gift to the university that will generate $3.78 million in the next 30 years. The gift will create more than 20 endowed scholarships over the next three decades. Funds will be matched by the ECU Endowment Fund and will create one additional scholarship each year worth at least $10,000.

In 1999, the Belks commissioned Jodi Hollnagel to create a three ton pirate sculpture that was placed at Dowdy-Ficklen Stadium on October 11, 1999 and dedicated during Homecoming October 23. They also donated money to the art department so that they could renovate the tilt furnace that would be capable of casting larger components of the statue.

History
Belk Building has 46,687 square feet of space which includes an auditorium seating 308, offices, classrooms, a library, and a laboratory. The building is flat-roofed and modern in design, and houses the School of Allied Health.
Additions
1976 - Belk Annex also known as the Speech & Hearing Clinic. This new addition has 4,800 gross square feet and 2,468 of assignable square feet.
1981 - Added Annex #2 with gross square feet of 1,680
1990 - Added Annex #5 with gross square feet of 1,1440
1992 - Expansion of lab space for the physical therapy area.
1994 - Added Annex #4 with gross square feet of 2,016
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Chancellor's Residence

Other names
Dail House, President's Home
Built
1920, purchased 1949
Construction cost
$30,000 purchase price
Gross sq. ft.
5,153
Assignable sq. ft.
5,029
History
In 1921 William Haywood Dail, Jr. a businessman who established Greenville's only brick manufacturing company, began building an Italianate home at 605 East Fifth Street. It was completed in 1931. The college purchased the structure in 1949 and all of East Carolina's chief executives since that time have resided there. The house was purchased from Mrs. Hattie F. Young for the sum of $30,000.

The stately home is centrally located opposite the Jenkins Fine Arts Center. John D. Messick was the first president to occupy the house.

The original President's Home, a frame structure located at the northeast corner of Jarvis and Fifth Streets, was converted into faculty apartments, became the Personnel Office and currently houses Career Services.

Additions
1980/81 - Renovations
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Christenbury Memorial Gymnasium

Other names
Memorial Health and Physical Education Building, Memorial Gymnasium
Built
1952
Construction cost
$722,000
Gross sq. ft.
52,701
Assignable sq. ft.
38,294
Architects
Eric G. Flannagan
Namesake
John B. Christenbury (1907-1944) Statesville native, was a football coach and physical education instructor at East Carolina from 1940-1943. He was educated at Davidson College and went on to receive an MA from Columbia University in 1934.

Excerpt from unidentified Asheville newspaper article entitled, "Christenbury Named Coach at Brevard," March 13, 1938:

Christenbury, a native of Statesville was an outstanding athlete at Davidson college, taking part in three major sports. While at Davidson he was known as one of the best wrestlers that had ever taken part in Southern conference matches for the Presbyterian school. He was a member of the baseball team 3 years. He graduated in 1930.

After leaving Davidson he accepted a position at Altamont Consolidated high school, Crossnore as athletic director. He remained there three years having successful season in all sports offered at the school.

He left the Crossnore post in the fall of 1934 to accept a job as athletic director at the Bolles Military and Naval Training School at Jacksonville, Florida. He remained at his post until the fall of 1937 when he accepted the head coaching job at Asheville high school.

He came to ECTC in 1940 and his 1941 team went undefeated and is still ECU's best winning record7-0-0. In his two years, ECU recorded 15 wins and 12losses. This gave him a .800 percent win record, best of all ECU coaches. On July 1, 1944, Mr. Christenbury was killed in an explosion at Port Chicago, California. The Gymnasium was dedicated January 6, 1953, to John B. Christenbury and to alumni who had died in World War II while serving in the U.S. Army.
History

Construction of the health and physical education building began during the summer of 1952 on land that had been used as the Dining Hall's vegetable garden. The building opened for classes July 11, 1952. Much needed space for the work of the health and physical education department was provided, and equipment was both excellent and up-to-date. The gym was used for men's and women's basketball until 1994 when Minges was expanded. It is currently used for intramural sports and campus recreation activities.

The brick structure houses a large 188 x 101 foot gym with a seating capacity for approximately 2400 people. The swimming pool, which is 75 x 35 feet, was the first pool constructed on campus. The building also houses offices, weight rooms, classrooms, locker rooms, and a basement dance studio.

The ECU Board of Trustees dedicated the building in 1953 as Christenbury Memorial Gymnasium, but no official action was ever recorded in the Board's minutes. It was re-dedicated in 1989 as the John B. Christenbury Memorial Gymnasium.

Additions
1970 - Archeology lab created in basement
1985 - completely resurfaced gym floor and painted ceiling and walls
1989 - roof repairs
1999 - basement modifications
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Clark-LeClair Stadium

Other names
ECU Baseball Stadium; Harrington Field
Built
2004
Construction cost
$10 million
Architects
Walter, Robbs, Callahan & Pierce
Namesake
Milton E. Harrington, a Pitt Co., NC, native, received his early education in Greenville, NC. In 1927 he entered Duke University and became one of their best baseball players. After his graduation he returned to Greenville, where he managed the first Greenville team in the Coastal Plain League and was referred to as "The Father of Organized Baseball" in Greenville. He was also a prominent local businessman, and became president and chairman of the board of Liggett and Myers Tobacco Company.

William H. Clark family of Greenville, which committed the lead gift of $1.5 million in support of the facility project. Clark, a long-time supporter of East Carolina Athletics and the Pirate Club, is a real estate developer who owns Bill Clark Homes of Greenville and residential communities in Raleigh, Wilmington and Myrtle Beach. He and wife Gloria are the parents of sons Hunter, Lance and Heath a former baseball player at ECU. "One of the reasons why I wanted to support this project was to get Keith's name on the stadium as it should be," Clark said. "I'm not sure one person has done as much for one individual sport as Keith has for our baseball program. I wanted there to be a legacy for Keith at ECU, something which would qualify the character that he has. "This (stadium) will be a giant step in realizing Keith's dream of the Pirates going to Omaha," Clark added. "It's a great advantage to host regionals and super regionals in your own park. Obviously, there's a much better chance to win those tournaments at home and be in a position to go on to Omaha."

Keith LeClair, former Pirates' head coach, who guided ECU from 1997 to 2002 before beginning his battle with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. LeClair played an integral role in the push for a new, state-of-the-art baseball stadium on the East Carolina campus, which began in earnest with a fund-raising campaign plan in 2001. "My family and I are honored and overwhelmed to have our name next to Bill Clark's family on the new stadium," said LeClair. "They have been so generous to our family the past three years during this difficult time in our lives and we sincerely appreciate all that they have done. "I truly hope that when people see the LeClair name on the stadium, that it represents all ECU coaches and players of the past and present and all the great tradition this baseball program was built on. I am truly honored and blessed for this opportunity and I want to thank all the supporters that made this dream of building a stadium a reality."

History
Harrington Field was located southwest of Dowdy-Ficklen Stadium and was dedicated on May 9, 1971. It was also renovated in 1971 at the cost of $100,000 raised by the East Carolina University Foundation. In 2004, the field was replaced by the 3,000 seat Clark-LeClair Stadium. The new seating bowl contains bleacher and individual seats, a press box and upgraded areas for booster club participants. Beneath the seating bowl the facility includes offices for the coaching staff, locker, training and equipment rooms. Site work included parking for +100 cars and upgrading the surrounding area to create a new entrance and pedestrian plaza.
Additions
1971 - renovated and lights added
2004 - $1.5 million renovation and construction of Clark-LeClair Stadium
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Clement Dormitory

Built
1969
Construction cost
$1.4 million
Gross sq. ft.
86,044
Assignable sq. ft.
57,997
Architects
Stinson, Hall, Hines, Winston
Namesake
Sarah Clement (1894-1970), a native of Mocksville, Davie County, North Carolina graduated from East Carolina University in 1915. In 1920, she began teaching third grade at Credle Elementary School in Oxford, NC where she remained until her retirement in 1960. Clement bequeathed $50,000 in her will to establish a student loan fund.
History
The building was dedicated on June 11, 1972. Clement building was the third of the high rise dormitories constructed as part of the 1967 capital improvements appropriation. Greene and White are the other two dormitories built at the time. This modern, flat roofed building is ten stories high and accommodates 400 students.
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College Stadium

Other names
Athletic Field
Built
1949
Razed
1962
Construction cost
$25,000
History
In November 1948 about 60 leading business and professional men agreed at a meeting that ECTC should have a football stadium and a progressive athletic program to keep in line with other colleges. $8,000 was pledged at the meeting which was presented to Dr. John D. Messick, president of the College.$25,000 was needed to begin the stadium and lighting facilities and consequently a fundraising campaign was initiated. Dr. Messick also thought that the stadium would attract more males to the college since GI Bill enrollments were declining.

By February 1949, 1,500 individuals and 227 business firms had contributed a sum of $25,730.00. The stadium was completed in 1949 with 2,000 seats. It was dedicated at the Cherry Point Marines-ECTC football game September 21, 1949 and was located just north of the area where Brewster building now stands. It was demolished in 1962 following completion of Ficklen Stadium to the south.

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Cotten Dormitory

Other names
Dormitory B
Built
1925
Construction cost
$203,750
Gross sq. ft.
47,088
Assignable sq. ft.
31,554
Architects
H.A. Underwood, Raleigh, NC
Namesake
Sallie Southall Cotten (1864-1929), the wife of Robert Randolph Cotten, was a Pitt County writer and poet and Greenville Community leader. She, along with other leading ladies of Greenville, organized the End Of The Century Book Club to improve the quality of life both in the home and in the community. The club was instrumental in the construction of Sheppard Memorial Library. Robert Cotten was a member of the General Assembly and was an advocate of ECTTS being placed in Greenville.

Click here to see a list of books about Sallie Southall Cotten which are available in Joyner Library.
Click here to see a list of books by Sallie Southall Cotten which are available in Joyner Library.

History
The site of this dormitory is eight feet lower than the original Austin Building. To match existing roof lines, Cotten was built as a three-story building and unless one looks closely, the change in elevation is not noticeable. The tile-roofed building continues the Spanish-mission style of architecture found in the original dormitories. This selection was the result of founder Thomas J. Jarvis experiences as minister to Brazil where he was influenced by the architecture. Built for use as a women's dormitory, it also housed the office of the Dean of Women for many years.
Additions
1950 - Renovation by James W. Griffith, Jr., Greenville, NC
1963 - Renovation of 6 bathrooms, Dudley & Shoe, Greenville, NC
1985 - Renovation, replaced HVAC System and wiring, painted
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Country Doctor Museum

Built
1967
Namesake
The Country Doctor Museum Foundation, a non-profit organization established and operated the museum from 1967-2003. The foundation was headed by Dr. Josephine Newell.
History
In 1967 Dr. Josephine Newell created the Country Doctor Museum Foundation in order to restore two 19th century physician offices. The offices were moved to Bailey, NC and were joined to form a single building. The museum includes Dr. Howard Franklin Freeman's office built in 1857 and an apothecary area. The museum also includes Dr. Cornelius Henry Brantley's office, circa 1887 and displays instruments and equipment of the period.

In August 2003 ownership was transferred to the Medical Foundation of East Carolina University and became part of the Laupus Health Sciences Library's History of Medicine program.

Country Doctor Museum website.

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Croatan

Other names
Auxiliary Student Supply Store, Soda Shop
Built
1970
Construction cost
$237,000
Gross sq. ft.
5,842
Assignable sq. ft.
4,228
Architects
Haskins & Rice
Namesake
It has been said that this building was built over an Indian graveyard of the Croatan tribe native to eastern North Carolina. An Indian priest visited the site to perform a ritual before construction began. They believed that the ghosts of the Indians were pleased in having the building named after their tribe.
History
The original Soda Shop was built in the summer of 1946. It was an addition to the Dining Hall as described in the following press release:

Greenville, July 1946 -- A large lobby adjacent to the post office and dining halls of East Carolina Teachers College is being converted into a modernistic soda shop. Work on the project already is under way and is expected to be completed during the summer, F.D. Duncan, treasurer, has announced.

Mr. Duncan also stated that the terrace between the dining halls will be landscaped and an outdoor court provided for soda shop patrons during hot weather. The soda shop will be well-lighted, roomy, and will be equipped with a new soda fountain if one can be procured.

The current Croatan was built during the 1969/70 school year. Containing approximately 5,842 square feet of space this modern brick, self-service snack shop is located on the eastern side of campus, close to Brewster and A.J. Fletcher buildings. It is operated by the Student Supply Store.
Additions
1990-91 - roof repairs
1991 - renovations from a snack bar to serving hot meals and sandwiches
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Davis Arboretum

Architects
R.N. Rouse, Goldsboro, NC
Namesake
Sallie Joyner Davis (1871-1954) received an undergraduate degree from the State Normal College in Greensboro and conducted her graduate work at the University of Pennsylvania, Duke University, and the University of California. She became a member of the original faculty and Director of the History department of East Carolina Teachers Training School (1909-1945). Davis served as the first Chairman of the Grounds Committee for "Campus Beautification."
History
The Arboretum consisted of walkways surrounded by trees and shrubs which were native to North Carolina. The six acre Arboretum included a small lily pond created and donated by the class of 1930, which had originally been a hog lot until 1929. The two granite entrances are located on either side of the Science Building, which is now the Graham Building. The entrance was built with WPA funds.

In 1937, the Green Mill Run was rerouted because of the extension of 10th Street and the lake was drained. The General Classroom Building was built in the arboretum in 1987.

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Dowdy-Ficklen Stadium

Other names
Ficklen Stadium
Built
1962/63
Construction cost
$283,387
Architects
Dudley & Shoe, Greenville, NC.
Namesake
James Skinner Ficklen (May 3, 1900 - September 17, 1955), a Greenville, NC, native, was a graduate of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. From 1925 until his death, he was president and chairman of the Board for the E.B. Ficklen Tobacco Company of Greenville. As president of both the Tobacco Association of the US and the Leaf Tobacco Exporters Association, he became an important business leader in Greenville. Ficklen established the Ficklen Foundation in the early 1950s which, among other projects, sponsored scholarships for a number of students at ECU. This stadium was dedicated on September 21, 1963.
History
In 1994, the stadium was renamed Dowdy-Ficklen Stadium after million dollar donors to the Shared Vision Campaign, Ronald and Mary Ellen Dowdy. Ronald Dowdy, an ECU alumnus, was elected to the Board of Trustees in the fall of 1993 and served until 1996. He oversees Dowdy Properties of Orlando, Florida.

In 1995, Al and Debbie Bagwell of Lake Gaston, VA contributed a large gift to the Pirate Club and the field inside of Dowdy-Ficklen Stadium is now known as Bagwell Field.

Originally built to seat 10,000 people, Ficklen Stadium was designed for eventual expansion to 50,000 seats. It now seats 50,000 people. When first built, the concrete portion of the stadium measured approximately 280 feet in length with the highest of its fifty eight rows of seats being sixty feet above the ground. Ficklen Stadium's press box placed sportswriters and cameramen 75 feet above the field. The stadium was built entirely through public subscription funds. Ficklen Stadium replaced the 5000 seat College Stadium.

Since then it has undergone many improvements to become a most outstanding stadium. There are currently plans to have a new strength and conditioning center added to the west end of Dowdy-Ficklen Stadium.

Additions
1967/68 - W.M. Freeman Associates, High Point, NC, increased seating capacity to 20,000.
1970 - F.A. Miller Company, painted exterior
1974 - L.E. Wooten, installation of lighting
1977/78 - increased seating capacity to 35,000
1988 - $82,000 for a sound system
1991 - $1.6 million in repairs and renovations
1994 - stadium renamed Dowdy-Ficklen; roads improved around stadium
1996/98 - increased seating capacity to 50,000; improvements to Press Box made
1999 - unveiling of 12 foot, 3 ton Pirate sculpture; new scoreboard
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ECU Dialysis Center

Built
1999
Construction cost
$1 million
Gross sq. ft.
17,000
History
Constructed by the dialysis center management firm Fresenius Medical Care to house 25 dialysis stations, as well as the clinical practice for the section of nephrology and academic and support offices. The center operates four shifts per day in order to triple the capacity and meet the growing need of the region. This is the first clinical practice facility that serves a disease-specific population.
Martin, Jane. "Clinical Research and Patient Care are Focus of ECU Dialysis Center," UHS People, February 1999, p. 4.
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Edward N. Warren Life Sciences Building

Other names
Vivarium
Built
1978
Construction cost
$1.6 million
Gross sq. ft.
15,090
Assignable sq. ft.
7,542
Namesake
In October 1999, the Life Sciences Building was dedicated to Edward Nelson Warren. Mr. Warren was a North Carolina Senator who showed great support for the additions to the building. The following article appeared in the Volume 8, No. 1, June/July 1999 issue UHS People.

New Facility to Honor State Senator

The new life sciences building at the East Carolina University School of Medicine will be named in honor of a Greenville State Senator.

The ECU board of trustees voted unanimously during its May meeting to name the new building after Sen. Ed Warren, a Democrat from Greenville.

"Mr. Warren has been a wonderful friend to ECU," said Chancellor Richard Eakin. "He has worked diligently on behalf of the institution."

Warren has been devoted to improving cardiac health. Research conducted inside the new life sciences building will focus on heart research. hat makes its new name "a wonderful tribute" to the senator, Eakin said.

Warren said he was "humbled" by the honor.

"I think it's a great honor for the life sciences building to be named for me," the state senator said. "I'm especially pleased because I understand the building's primary purpose will be research and heart research. I chair the North Carolina Heart Disease and Stroke Prevention Task Force, and this is one of my primary interests. ECU projects have always been among my top priorities in my political career in the General Assembly."

The official name of the $14 million facility will be the Edward Nelson Warren Life Sciences Building. At 60,000 square feet, the building will house the radiation biology and comparative medicine departments.

According to university officials, the building should be completed and ready for occupation later this month.

History
The $2.5 million Life Sciences Building and Utility Pant, the first two buildings to be completed at the medical school's health science campus, opened in January 1980.

The 15,090 square foot Life Sciences Building, which took 15 months to complete, contains 13 animal rooms, an operating suite, an infectious and isotope isolation area and three faculty project labs for extended research.

Additions
1989 - 47,000 square feet addition for research labs and support facilities-$12.3 million
1996 - groundbreaking for a 68,000 square feet addition for heart and cancer research
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Eller House

Built
1925
Gross sq. ft.
3,500
Assignable sq. ft.
2,721
Namesake
This building was named after Ernest McNeil Eller of Annapolis Maryland. Rear Admiral Eller was born in Marion, Virginia in 1903. He was a 1921 graduate of North Carolina College. He received his Naval Officer's Commission from Annapolis in 1925 and the Masters Degree from George Washington University in 1934. He remained in the Navy being promoted to the rank of Rear Admiral in 1954 and retired in 1970. Eller served during World War II as Assistant Naval Attache in London in 1940, aboard the USS Saratoga, USS Utah, USS Texas and the Submarine S-3. He served on the staff of the Commander-in-Chief, U.S. Pacific Fleet and Command of the USS Clay. After World War II, the admiral attended the National War College and was assigned to the Staff Planning Section of Joint Staff, Joint Chiefs of Staff. [Jemison Beshears, Volume 6, Stem to Stern, 1990]

In his nomination letter addressed to the Board of Trustees, Carl Swanson stated:

Admiral Eller, a Naval Academy graduate and decorated veteran of World War II, is a well-known scholar of American maritime history. After a distinguished career at sea and in various naval command positions, Admiral Eller came out of retirement to become the Director of Naval History and Curator for the Department of the Navy at the Naval Historical Center in Washington, DC. Serving in this capacity from 1956 until his retirement in 1970, Admiral Eller launched several documentary series of great importance to maritime historians including, Naval Documents of the American Revolution, the Dictionary of American Naval Fighting Ships, and the Civil War Naval Chronology. He is also the author and editor of numerous works concerning the history of the United States Navy. Additionally, Admiral Eller oversaw the establishment of the Naval Historical Display Center at the Washington Navy Yard in 1961. In 1967 as the recipient of the Alfred T. Mahan Award, Admiral Eller was "recognized as a distinguished author on Maritime subjects . . . (who) has endeavored with impressive determination to gain interest and involvement by competent writers in the broad mosaic of subjects relating to the total strength at sea."

The building was dedicated on April 17, 1991 in honor of retired Admiral Eller of the U.S. Navy. He was a scholar of American maritime history and in 1990, he donated his entire personal library (over 2000 books) to ECU. Admiral Eller was also a generous patron to the ECU libraries and History Department and he is also the founder and donor to the Eller Fellowship in Naval History. Admiral Eller died on July 30, 1992 at the age of 89.

Click here to see books by Ernest M. Eller held by Joyner Library.

History
ECU acquired Eller House in 1974 at a cost of $35,000. The building houses the ECU Graduate Program in Maritime History and Nautical Archaeology. It is located at 302 East 9th Street on the corner of Cotanche Street.
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English Annex

Other names
Faculty Offices
Built
1938
Construction cost
$3,000
History
This former garage was converted for use as a laundry distribution and office center in 1962. It became the Traffic Office in 1979, and finally the English Annex in 1981.
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Erwin Building

Other names
Teachers Dormitory, Faculty Apartments
Built
1952
Construction cost
$312,328
Gross sq. ft.
14,652
Assignable sq. ft.
8,973
Architects
Eric G. Flannagan, Henderson, NC
Namesake
Clyde Atkinson Erwin(1897-1952) was a student at the University of North Carolina in 1915-1916. In 1933, he was President of the North Carolina Education Association and gained recognition for his efforts to establish a state-supported school system. Erwin was State Superintendent of Public Instruction (1936-1952) and at the same time Ex-Officio Chairman of the ECU Board of Trustees. The building was dedicated at the Founder's Day Celebration on Tuesday March 8, 1955.
History
This brick and steel construction was built on the old site of the basketball court. Erwin Building is a three story modified Georgian building. It was originally built to house faculty members and contained twenty one units of twin rooms each connected by a bathroom and a kitchenette. Currently the Erwin Building houses the Department of Communication, University College, and PEN-PAL Project.
Additions
1958 - Holbrook Contracting Company, Renovations and Waterproofing
1989 & 1990 - Foundation repair
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Financial Aid Building

Other names
Refectory, North Cafeteria, Old Cafeteria, Dining Hall
Built
1909
Construction cost
$9,382.40, bid
Gross sq. ft.
46,268
Assignable sq. ft.
35,542
Architects
Hook & Rogers, Charlotte, NC & H.W. Simpson, New Bern, NC
History
In 1909 the campus consisted of two dormitories, the Administration Building, Power Plant, Infirmary and the Refectory. Photographs and architectural drawings show the small kitchen and dining room built in 1909. On April 1, 1915 a leaky chimney caused a fire which gutted the building; only the exterior brick walls remained. During the following summer, a new kitchen was constructed and the old kitchen converted into additional dining space.

With the growth of the student body, more dining facilities were required. George Berryman designed an addition to the Dining Hall in 1927. Other additions to the building took place in later years.

The original Soda Shop was built in the summer of 1946. It was an addition to the Dining Hall as described in the following press release

Greenville, July 1946 -- A large lobby adjacent to the post office and dining halls of East Carolina Teachers College is being converted into a modernistic soda shop. Work on the project already is under way and is expected to be completed during the summer, F.D. Duncan, treasurer, has announced.

Mr. Duncan also stated that the terrace between the dining halls will be landscaped and an outdoor court provided for soda shop patrons during hot weather. The soda shop will be well-lighted, roomy, and will be equipped with a new soda fountain if one can be procured.

The Dining Hall also known as the North Cafeteria, was empty for much of the 1970s and 1980s. Private vendors now provide dining services for the university and additional dining facilities have been created. A 1985 renovation included reframing the roof, removal of part of the tile roof and replacement of the tile roof with an asphalt shingle roof. It once housed the Geology Sedimentological Laboratory in the basement and the Institute for Coastal and Marine Resources on the main floor. It is now the home of Mail Services, Financial Aid and the Internal Auditor's Office.

Additions
1927 - George Berryman, Raleigh, NC
1916 - New kitchen built after fire
1946 - Lobby remodeled to include a Soda Shop, building also housed the Post Office
1985 - Roof reconstruction
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Flanagan Building

Other names
Science Building
Built
1939
Construction cost
$325,000
Gross sq. ft.
100,342
Assignable sq. ft.
72,055
Architects
Eric G. Flannagan, Henderson, NC
Namesake
Edward Gaskill Flanagan (1875-1942), a Greenville native, was a member of the ECTC Board of Trustees and chairman of the ECTC Building Committee. He inherited the Flanagan Buggy Company from his father, served in the North Carolina General Assembly and was president of the Guarantee Bank & Trust Company.
History
Flanagan Building was dedicated on March 8, 1941, by Governor Clyde R. Hoey during homecoming. Home coming was postponed from fall to winter in order to dedicate this new structure in connection with the event. This classroom building is located in the central part of campus next to the Student Health Center. It was built with a combination of state and Public Works Administration funds representing ECTC's only participation in the WPA program. The structure is U-shaped with a court opening to the south. It originally housed the Science, Home Economics, Commerce and Geography Departments.

In 1993, Flanagan Building became a part of the East Carolina Historical District. The ECU Board of Trustees decided not to register the building on the National Register of Historic Buildings, but instead decided to make its own register.

Additions
1950 - Greenhouse built
1957 - 1960 - Eric G. Flannagan, and Dudley & Shoe, attic completed with room partitions, cost $145,000
1962 - James W. Griffith, addition to connect the wings and close the court on the south side, cost $375,000
1969 - Fenner & Proffitt, HVAC system renovated, cost $1,195,000
1997 - Renovations to the chemistry lab
Within the next 10 years a $13.4 million renovation for technology is planned.
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Flanagan Sylvan Theatre

Other names
amphitheater
Built
1956
Razed
2004
Construction cost
$10,000
Architects
John B. Lippard, Charlotte, NC
Namesake
Edward Gaskill Flanagan (1875-1942), a Greenville native, was a member of the ECTC Board of Trustees and chairman of the ECTC Building Committee. He inherited the Flanagan Buggy Company from his father, served in the North Carolina General Assembly and was president of the Guarantee Bank & Trust Company.
History
The amphitheater was built with $10,000 donated by Mrs. Rosa H. Flanagan in memory of her husband. It was an open air theatre located on the western campus. The theatre was made from concrete and brick in a U-shaped design. It had cement terrace type seating for 800 and the stage was 35 feet by 45 feet. The theatre was dedicated on May 10, 1956 and the dedication program included a production of Shakespeare's Macbeth.

The last time that the amphitheater was used for a performance was in the 1970's when a band named The Association came to campus to play. It had been used for play auditions since then but not much else. Other than that it has been a quiet place for students to study and a place for students to sun. In 1997, the announcement that the Theatre was going to be done away with to made room for a new dining hall was made public. In 2004 the West End Dining Hall was erected on the site.

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Fleming Dormitory

Other names
Girls Dormitory, Dormitory A
Built
1922/23
Construction cost
$163,200
Gross sq. ft.
32,428
Assignable sq. ft.
23,225
Architects
H.A. Underwood, Engineer, Raleigh
Namesake
James Lawson Fleming (1867-1909), lawyer and state senator (1905-1909) from Pitt County, introduced the legislation to establish East Carolina Teachers Training School.

A brief biography of James L. Fleming appeared in the April, May, June 1914 issue of the Training School Quarterly. It is as follows

Whenever beginnings are sought and the early days of the Training School recorded the name of James Lawson Fleming, will appear.

Descended from sturdy, honest, industrious and noble ancestry, he inherited their sterling qualities, while his early life spent on a farm served to develop his body and to give him that independence of spirit that comes from contact with the freedom of country life. As a boy he attended the country schools and knew the advantages and disadvantages to which the rural school is subject. Later he became a pupil of W. H. Ragsdale, then teaching in the Greenville Academy, by whom he was prepared for Wake Forest College. After graduation from college he taught for a year, then read law with Latham and Skinner, of Greenville. Later he attended the Law School of the University of North Carolina. He was admitted to the bar in 1892, and located in Greenville, where he soon built up a lucrative practice and at the time of his death he possessed a large practice in the Superior, Supreme, and Federal Courts. Soon after locating in Greenville he was elected mayor of the town, and served his term of office to the satisfaction of his fellow citizens. In 1904 he was elected by a large majority to represent the county of Pitt in the Senate, and again in 1906. As Senator from Pitt in 1905 and 1907 his services were marked by vigor and distinction.

Among the important measures which engaged his attention, education in Eastern Carolina was not least. Upon his election in 1906 he agreed to introduce a bill to establish such a school in the eastern part of the State as had become the dream and the hope of the educational leaders of the eastern section of the State. When the General Assembly met, Senator Fleming introduced the bill but its career was not an easy one.

A similar bill from Elizabeth City had been killed by the previous General Assembly. There was stubborn opposition on the part of those who did not realize the needs of the eastern section, and who did not favor the State's increasing the number of schools already established. Under Senator Fleming's wise guidance, however, and by his tireless efforts, in season and out of season, the bill was so successfully presented that those who had fought it became its friends, and those disinterested became interested. The bill passed, and the East Carolina Teachers' Training School became a reality. It remained to secure the school for Greenville and here again Senator Fleming used his tireless energy to secure the location in Greenville.

Two years later, just one month after the buildings were completed and the school was opened, on November 5, 1909, he was killed in an automobile accident, and it was left for others to see and realize what the establishment of the East Carolina Teacher Training School, for which he had labored so earnestly and so successfully, was to mean to its section of the State. He was truly one of its founders and his work as a founder had been so well done that it was easier for others to continue to work for the maintenance and support of the school.

History
East Carolina quickly established its reputation as a fine teachers training school. Qualified applicants were turned away for lack of space. In 1923, Fleming Dormitory was built to help alleviate space problems. The contract included additions to Administration Building in the total cost of $163,200. $80,000 of that amount was set aside by the Board of Trustees for the erection of Fleming Hall.

The sturdy brick structure was designed as a near replica of the original dormitory buildings, Jarvis and Wilson dormitories.

In 1990 Fleming was designated to be a special dorm that housed only Honors students, Teaching Fellows, and University Scholars.

Additions
1984 - Air conditioning installed and other renovations
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Fletcher Dormitory

Built
1963
Construction cost
$1 million
Gross sq. ft.
80,649
Assignable sq. ft.
59,594
Architects
Jesse Page & Associates, Raleigh, NC
Namesake
Inglis Fletcher (1879-1969) studied sculpture at Washington University in St. Louis, but did not graduate. After her marriage (1902), she followed her husband John Fletcher to mining camps in California, Oregon and Alaska. While residing in Spokane, she began her writing career and her first book was published in 1931. She traveled worldwide to do research for her works. Eight years later she began writing historical novels about North Carolina and this series of books became best sellers and were translated into many languages.

The Fletchers moved to Edenton, North Carolina where Inglis became actively involved in community activities.

Click here to see a list of books by Inglis Fletcher held by Joyner Library.
See also Manuscript Collection # 21 for more information regarding Inglis Fletcher.

History
Dedicated on November 8, 1964, this modern, seven story, flat roofed dormitory for women is constructed of brick, steel, and concrete. Partial financing was provided by the Federal Housing and Home Finance Agency. It was built to house 432 students and was the tallest building in Greenville at the time. It was often referred to as the "skyscraper dorm."
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Garrett Dormitory

Other names
Dormitory for Women
Built
1956
Construction cost
$830,000
Gross sq. ft.
53,344
Assignable sq. ft.
38,431
Architects
J. Griffith, Greenville, NC
Namesake
A native North Carolinian, Radford Marvin "Ralph" Garrett (1886-1955) was a leading figure in the tobacco industry, founding the Greenville firm of Person-Garrett in 1915. Garrett's business background led to his appointment to the board of directors of the Greenville State Bank & Trust Company. He also served on the ECTC Board of Trustees from 1946 to 1955.
History
The dormitory was dedicated on Founders Day, March 8, 1957. At the time, the three story brick structure was the largest women's dormitory on campus, and the first to be built in 25 years. Quicksand was discovered on the building site on the south side of Fifth Street near the western end of the campus.

Garrett was the first residence hall on campus to go "coed." In 1974 a report was made by students living in Garrett to the Board of Trustees regarding the first year experiment with coed living.

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Garrett House

Other names
Computer Center Annex
Built
late 1940's
Razed
1996
Gross sq. ft.
3,120
Assignable sq. ft.
2,181
History
This was the third home acquired by ECU in October 1984 along with Blount House. It was a brick structure located next to Blount House on East Tenth Street. The Computer Center Annex was located in the Garrett House until the building was demolished to make way for the Tenth Street entrance to Joyner Library.
Additions
No additions were made but some remodeling was done shortly after acquisition by ECU so that the building would accommodate the new Computer Center Annex.
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Graham Building

Other names
Classroom Building
Built
1929
Construction cost
$178,000
Gross sq. ft.
16,080
Assignable sq. ft.
13,454
Architects
George R. Berryman, Raleigh, NC
Namesake
Maria Daniel Graham (1876-1947), professor at East Carolina from 1909 until 1945, founded the Math Department and served the college for over three decades. She received her B.A. from Peabody College and M.A. from Columbia University. She also attended the University of Chicago but did not finish her doctorate degree. Miss Graham, a North Carolina native, followed the footsteps of many of her family members who were also professional educators. The building was named for her in 1949.
History
Constructed in 1929, this rectangular classroom building occupies a place on Wright Circle. Additions were completed in later years including a 1961 addition that provided space for the Departments of Foreign Languages and Geography. In past years Graham has housed the Science and Education Departments, the Practice School kindergarten and the Nursing School.

In 1993, the ECU Board of Trustees made the Graham Building part of the university's historical district. The Board of Trustees did not want the building put on the National Register of Historical Buildings because of possible future problems with renovations and additions to the building.

In November 1993, the Class of 1993 donated a clock to be placed in front of Graham Building.

Additions
1960/61 - Allen J. Mawell, Jr., third story addition
1981-83 - Renovation construction for an institutional research facility for the Geology Department at a cost of $1,434,000
1994 - New air conditioning units were installed
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Greene Dormitory

Built
1966
Construction cost
$1.2 million
Gross sq. ft.
82,731
Assignable sq. ft.
57,997
Architects
Stinson
Namesake
Mary Hemphill Greene (1902-1968) received her B.A. degree from Agnes Scott College (1924) and M.A. degree from Columbia University (1928). Greene became a faculty member of the ECU English Department in 1928 and remained here until her death. She also belonged to a small faculty group constituting the early News Bureau at ECU, which was involved in transmitting college news stories to local papers. From 1945-1963, Mary Greene directed the operations of the News Bureau on a part-time basis.
History
Dedicated on February 2, 1969, the building was the first of three ten story dormitories for women built at the western end of campus. It was designed to house 400 women students. The exterior is composed of vertical sections of brick, alternating with rows of windows.
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Harold H. Bate Building

Other names
General Classroom Building
Built
1988
Construction cost
$12.4 million
Gross sq. ft.
166,640
Assignable sq. ft.
111,220
Architects
Little & Associates, Inc., Charlotte, NC
Namesake
On February 10, 2001 the General Classroom Building was renamed in honor of Harold H. Bate (1907-2000) of New Bern. After graduating from Cornell University he became a philanthropist, investor, and joined the family lumber business until his retirement. Bate was originally from New York, but moved to New Bern in 1964 to expand the family business. Mr. Bate, who died last year at the age of 93, made contributions to ECU totaling more than $2.7 million as well as establishing the Harold H. Bate Foundation, which has assets close to $60 million.
History
East Carolina's newest classroom building is the largest on campus. It contains 65 classrooms and labs, 30 of which are tiered seminar rooms, and 180 faculty offices. Housed in this building are the School of Business, the English Department, the Business Education Department, the Foreign Languages & Literatures Department, the Honors Program, International Studies, and the Branch Banking & Trust Center for Leadership Development offices.

1990 - Room 2203 was designated the "Inglis Fletcher Library" in honor of the late novelist and in appreciation of her granddaughter Carolista Fletcher-Golden's donation of Ms. Fletcher's elegant Jacobean library furnishings. Some of these furnishings include: an Anglo-Persian rug, a Jacobean chair and bench, an antique deacon's bench, and a library table used by Ms. Fletcher while writing.

August 1992 - General Classroom Building 1031 was named in honor of W. Howard Rooks of Alexandria, Virginia. He was an ECU alumnus and major supporter of the School of Business and University Scholar Awards Program. Also the Department of Communication's computer lab was named after alumnus Charles S. Edwards.

1992 & 1993 - Faculty and Students experienced headaches and skin rashes due to high levels of carbon dioxide. Improvements to the ventilation system were made to reduce the high concentration and to improve the environment for the faculty and students.

April 1998 - Professors Emeriti James L. Fleming and Marguerite A. Perry are honored by having the Foreign Language and Literature Conference Room named after them. Students know it today as the Fleming-Perry Conference Room.

March 1999 - Students raise concern over Halon 1301 signs over the doors over the computer lab on the third floor. The signs read "Warning: Do not enter room when alarm sounds. Halon 1301 is being released." In case of a fire, Halon 1301 is used to deplete areas of oxygen in a matter of minutes to reduce damage. Since Halon gives off CFC's, the Environmental Protection Agency issued a mandate in 1993 that no more Halon 1301 can be produced. Only recycled Halon can be used until new systems can be installed. Because of the high cost, ECU has made no plans to convert to a new system until the old one containing Halon has been used.

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Harris Building

Other names
Harris Supermarket
Built
1997 (rebuilt)
Construction cost
not known
Gross sq. ft.
19,325
Namesake
The family of the late Durward M. Harris Sr. of Greenville donated this house and lot to ECU after a fire damaged portions of it. These family members included Edna Harris, wife of the late D.M. Harris Sr., Duff Harris, president of Harris Supermarkets, Susan Harris, and Jane Moore who are vice presidents of Harris Supermarkets. These family members along with Durward M. Harris Sr. were the founders of Harris Supermarkets.

The building was dedicated on March 13, 1998 by the ECU Board of Trustees in honor of the Harris Family and their commitment to ECU and the Greenville area.

History
A fire burned down the original building that housed Harris Supermarket and later a mobile home materials warehouse. The Harris family decided to enter into a build to suit/gift purchase arrangement with ECU for the accommodations of the printing and graphics department. The one and a half acre plot and the remains of the burnt building were purchased by ECU for $600,000, which is half of the appraised value of the property. A large portion of the selling price was deferred as a gift to the university in honor of the Harris Family and the long standing commitment of Harris Supermarkets to the Greenville community.

The off campus building located at 2612 East 10th Street houses University Printing, Rapid Copy Central, and CopiServe. The facility employs 25 full time staff and 15 student workers. By moving into this new building, it freed up 10,000 square feet in the main campus building that housed the department previously.

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Heating Plant

Other names
Heating Plant No. 2
Built
1967/68
Construction cost
$785,000
Architects
Olsen Associates, Raleigh, NC
History
This was the third heating plant to be built on the ECU campus, but instead of replacing the older heating plant it works as an additional source. It is located on 14th Street, close to Minges Coliseum.
Additions
1974/75 - Olsen & Associates, Raleigh, NC, Additions and Improvements
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Howard House

Built
1923
Construction cost
not known
Gross sq. ft.
3,488
Assignable sq. ft.
3,138
Namesake
Howard House is named after the second owner Charles W. Howard (1886-1953). Mr. Howard was born in Durham County and moved with his wife Hannah to Greenville in 1927. He was founder, president and treasurer of Greenville Tobacco Company. He also served as director of the State Bank and Trust Company, president of the Greenville Chamber of Commerce and the Greenville Tobacco Board of Trade. Hannah Howard continued to live in the home until her death in 1980.
History
Built in 1923 by William Bryan of Grimesland, the architecture combines elements of the colonial revival and the picturesque styles. The symmetrical facade is seven bays wide, with a triple set of small cross gables accenting the front of the house. Mock half-timbering enlivens the gable ends, as do the dressed stone chimneys. The roof is made of slate. ECU acquired Howard House on August 13, 1981 at a cost of $55,000 and began to renovate it for office use. The house was first used by ECU as the Traffic Department creating a number of protests in the neighborhood because it caused traffic congestion in a residential area. Subsequently the Traffic Department, in late 1984, moved into new quarters on 10th Street and the ECU News Bureau and the Public Relations office then moved into Howard House. This house is located across from the Spilman Building.
Additions
1981 - Renovated for office use
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Howell Science Complex

Other names
Science Complex
Built
1969
Construction cost
$3.5 million
Gross sq. ft.
95,844 total
Assignable sq. ft.
52,526 total
Architects
Holloway
Namesake
On October 3,1991 the Science Building was dedicated to John McDade and Gladys David Howell. Mr. Howell was chancellor of ECU from 1982-1987 and held faculty and academic administrative positions at ECU for 30 years. He started his service at ECU when he became a part of the Political Science faculty in 1957. In 1963 he became the founding chair of the Political Science Department. He was also Dean of the College of Arts and Sciences in 1966, Dean of the Graduate School in 1969, and Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs from 1973-1979. Next, he returned to the classroom for three years to teach and then became Chancellor of ECU after Dr. Thomas B. Brewster resigned.

Mrs. Howell is a retired member of the ECU Sociology faculty. She retired in 1982 when her husband agreed to become Chancellor of ECU, and her service to the university continued to be depicted in her actions. Together the Howells have almost 60 years of service invested in ECU.

History
The Science Departments were originally located in the Flanagan Building. The complex includes eight areas connected by covered walkways and a central foyer. These areas are referred to as the East, South, and North Wings. The department of Physics has the East Wing, and the biology Department has the rest of the complex. Double cement columns provide space for extensive plumbing associated with laboratory facilities. This brick building is modern in design.

In 1969, the Senior Class along with the Alumni Association and the Student Government Association joined together to purchase chimes to be placed on the roof of the building. Different sets of chimes can be played and also campus announcements can be made. The chimes were set to strike from 7:00 am until 10:00 pm every half hour.

Additions
1992 - Central smoke detector and fire alarm installed
1992 - Renovations and improvements to the Department of Communication television studio
1998 - Replaced animal air conditioner ($34,540)
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J.Y. Joyner Library

Built
1954
Construction cost
Gross sq. ft.
84,641
Assignable sq. ft.
66,347
Architects
Eric G. Flannagan, Henderson, NC [original building]
Namesake
James Yadkin Joyner (1862-1954), a North Carolina native, graduated from the University of North Carolina in 1881 with a Ph.B. degree (bachelor of philosophy) at age 19, the youngest member of the class. He taught at Winston Graded Schools (1884-1885) and served as superintendent at Goldsboro Graded Schools (1889-1893). During the intervening period, he studied at Greensboro Law School (1885-1886) and practiced law in the firm of Faircloth, Allen, and Joyner (1886-1889), in Goldsboro. In 1902 Governor Charles Brantley Aycock appointed Joyner superintendent of public instruction. Joyner held his position until 1919. During his term, he instituted many reforms in the state's system of public education. He was also the first ex-officio chairman of the ECTTS Board of Trustees (1907-1918) and later a member of the board (1922-1925).

Joyner also served as superintendent of the Lenoir County schools, chairman of the board of education of Wayne County schools, head of the English department of the State Normal and Industrial School for Women in Greensboro, member of board of directors at Meredith College and the University of North Carolina, and the first southerner elected president of the National Education Association.

In 1890, in a request for funds for the Goldsboro Graded School library, Joyner wrote:

Good books are great store-houses of educational material.

The child or the teacher who undertakes the work of education without access to these great store-houses must labor under great disadvantages. He may have his tools but, as Carlyle says of Burns, "He must discover his material where no eye before has seen it. "Teach a child to read, and then cultivate his taste for good literature by placing good books in his way and getting him to taste of them, and what a wonderful power you place in that child's grasp. You open to him the avenues to all knowledge. You give him the power to commune with all the great minds and all the great souls of the ages. Who can measure the influence of such companions upon the child's life and character!

For more information see the following titles in the Joyner Library Catalog: Manuscript Collection #345, James Yadkin Joyner Papers, Special Collections
Books by J.Y. Joyner
Books about J.Y. Joyner

History
From the beginning of East Carolina Teachers Training School, the library was located in the original Austin Building, and then moved to Whichard for the period October 1924 to March 1954.

A notice in the East Carolina Teachers College News Vol. I, No. 2, November 5, 1923 mentions that:

the Library Building has been staked off and will soon be under way. The building will be well equipped and up-to-date for library service.
Opening day, October 15, 1924 is described in the October 27, 1924 issue of the East Carolina Teachers College News.

The east wing of Joyner was built from 1952-1955 and was dedicated on Founder's Day, March 8, 1955. This wing was an L-shaped building, 268 feet across the front, with a central four columned portico. It had a 230,000 volume capacity including the microfilm material. The next year a 136 foot radio tower was erected.

The 1964 addition included the air conditioning and divided the reading room into two floors. In 1966, the second addition added 15,000 square feet of floor space to the east wing stacks.

Two extra floors were added to the existing two at a cost of $736,251. The west wing was added in 1973. The connecting area between the east and west wings contained the circulation desk and catalogues. The west wing housed large stack areas and study space for students. The construction added 91,492 gross square feet with 70,084 assignable square feet of space to the library.

In 1974 it was decided to stop using the Dewey Decimal Classification to catalog most materials. A re-cataloging project was begun to convert the catalog to the Library of Congress Classification. Dewey is still used in to catalog materials in the Teaching Resources Department. The 1980's and early '90's saw the transition from traditional card catalogs to on-line searching. LS2000 was the first on-line catalog installed ca. 1986. Patrons used dumb terminals to search for books. By 1993 patrons were using Marquis which was renamed Horizon one year later. 1994 saw the completion of the re-cataloging, the card catalog was no longer being produced and was removed from the public area.

A three phase, $30.3 million renovation and construction project was carried out between 1994 and 1999 which increased the net square footage of the library by 49 percent. Seventeen miles of additional shelving were erected enabling the library to expand holdings to 1.5 million volumes. Other additions incorporated in the renovation and construction include: 250 computer workstations for public use that access library and Internet resources
100 graduate student study carrels
75 faculty study carrels
36 group study rooms
Sonic Plaza Several departments were moved to the new addition, including Cataloging, Interlibrary Loan Services, North Carolina Collection, Special Collections and the University Archives. The building was rededicated Founder's Day, March 8, 1999.

Additions
1956 - Radio Tower
1964 - Edwards, McGee & Scovil, Raleigh, NC, Additions & Renovations
1966 - Edwards, McGee & Scovil, Raleigh, NC, 2nd Addition
1973/74 - West Wing added, $3.2 million
1994-1999 - 3 Phase Construction & Renovation Project $30.3 million by Walter, Robbs, Callahan & Pierce
1991-1998 - construction of the Sonic Plaza, $110,000, designed by Christopher Janney
2001 - Naming and dedication ceremony for the Langford-Joyner Clock Tower and the Verona Joyner Langford North Carolina Collection held on Founders Day.
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Jarvis Dormitory

Other names
Boy's Dormitory, East Dormitory, Leadership Dormitory
Built
1908/09
Construction cost
$13,139.85 (bid)
Gross sq. ft.
30,251
Assignable sq. ft.
25,319
Architects
Hook & Rogers, and H.W. Simpson, Charlotte, NC
Namesake
Thomas Jordan Jarvis (1836-1915), an 1860 graduate of Randolph-Macon College, was legislator (1868-1876), lieutenant governor (1876-1879) and governor of North Carolina (1879-1885); and chairman of the executive committee of the ECTTS Board of Trustees (1908-1915). Jarvis oversaw the the construction of the original campus buildings and worked closely with the legislature and new college administration during the formative years. He is affectionately known as the Father of ECU. He was memorialized in the 1915, Volume II, No. 2 issue of the Training School Quarterly.
History
One of the original buildings, the structure retains some of the Spanish- mission style architecture. Jarvis is the only original building that still serves the purpose it was built as a residence hall. The building underwent a two year renovation and restoration project from 1998 to 2000. An open house was held on July 20, 2000 and the building reopened for students in August 2000.
Additions
1914 - Hook & Rogers, Charlotte, NC, West wing, $9,785
1920 - James A. Salter, Raleigh, NC, East wing built, $69,000
Training School Quarterly, Vol. 8, 1920, p. 89:
The carpenters have been busy at the Training School ever since last March. A new wing has been added to east dormitory...

The new wing is very attractive. This wing has the general appearance of the other wing but has more conveniences and is more up-to-date. There is running water in every room; there are shower baths in the lavatories. The floors in the building are concrete but are covered with a plank flooring.
1924 - oldest part is fireproofed
1979 - Renovations and installation of air conditioning, $6,192,000
1998 to 2000 - William A. Nichols, Jr., renovations and addition of a multipurpose room and patio, $5,095,000

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Jenkins Fine Arts Center

Built
1973 to 1977
Construction cost
$4.2 million
Gross sq. ft.
109,994
Assignable sq. ft.
77,678
Architects
Odell & Associates, Charlotte, NC
Namesake
Leo W. Jenkins (May 28, 1913 - January 14, 1989) obtained a BS degree from Rutgers University, an MA at Columbia University and a D.ED at New York University. He came to East Carolina University in the fall of 1947, as dean. After serving in the US Marine Corps during WWII, he had been professor of Political Science at Montclair State Teachers College and Assistant to the Commissioner of Higher Education in New Jersey. He was elected president of ECU on January 1st, 1960. Dr. Jenkins retired in 1978 after a distinguished career which included getting the medical school at ECU.
History
This building was erected on the site of Old Austin and its neighbor Wilson Hall, which were demolished to make room available for its construction. It was dedicated April 24, 1977. This modern Brick structure features large open glass bay windows, and a circular stairwell. It was constructed in two phases and contains a total of 142,000 square feet. Located on Fifth Street, it currently houses the School of Art and the Wellington B. Gray Art Gallery. A more complete description of the building may be found at Leo W. Jenkins Art Building, East Carolina University
Additions
1999 - October 23rd, Irwin Belk Foundry dedicated. Foundry and pirate sculpture created using $100,000 gift from Irwin Belk.
1994 - new art gallery built-funded by Burroughs-Wellcome
1993 - security system installed
1984 - installation of dust collecting ducts
1981 - repair concrete entrance ramp
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Jones Dormitory

Built
1959
Construction cost
$1.2 million
Gross sq. ft.
103,520
Assignable sq. ft.
75,044
Architects
Eric G. Flannagan
Namesake
Dr. Paul Erastus Jones (1890-1977) a native of Pitt County, was graduated from Bethel High School and attended Richmond College and the Medical College of Virginia from which he graduated in 1910. He was a member of the Pitt County Medical and Dental Society and the American Dental Association and a fellow of the American College of Dentists and the International College of Dentists.. He served as president of the North Carolina Dental Society in 1930 and of the American Association of Dental Examiners in 1946. Jones served as a member of the Farmville School Board for 25 years, the Pitt County Board of Education for several years and the Board of Trustees for the University of North Carolina from1951 to 1959. He was a veteran of World War II and was elected State Senator from this district 1949-1957.
History
The building was constructed through a loan of $1,420,000 from the Federal Housing and Home Finance Agency. It was the first dormitory built on the "Hill" and was dedicated on May 15, 1960. Built in a contemporary style, the four story H-shaped structure has a basement and a cafeteria which seats 380. The building was twice the size of any other existing structure on campus at that time. It was designed to house 520 male students.
Additions
1964 - Recreation Room remodeled as a cafeteria
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Joyner School

Other names
Model School
Namesake
James Yadkin Joyner (1862-1954) served as the superintendent of public instruction for North Carolina and was a member of the ECTTS Board of Trustees (1907-1918, 1922-1925). See J.Y. Joyner Library for additional information. This school was originally known as Forbes School after the merchants Alfred and Arthur Forbes who donated the land. An early pupil claims that the school's name was changed to Joyner School after O.J. Joyner who owned land adjoining the Forbes property, because there was already a Forbes School in existence. Joyner School could have been named after either of these individuals.
History
The building was originally a one room structure with a movable partition. In 1917, this elementary school was obtained and used until 1923 by ECTTS through a cooperative agreement with Pitt County Schools. It was subsequently converted (1916-1918) into a three room school with two small front porches. An initial sum of $500 was appropriated by ECTTS for the establishment of a program in this building. Details of the agreement are recorded in Volume 1, pp. 252-257 and 265-267 of the Board of Trustees Meeting Minutes. Joyner School was meant to provide experience for ECTTS teachers in a realistic teaching position within a rural community. Additionally, the lessons that the Joyner School students were taught were more appropriate for the problems they would encounter in a rural lifestyle. In 1919 an automobile was purchased by the ECTTS Board of Trustees to be used by the student teachers. Joyner School is about two miles northwest of Greenville on NC 43. It was last used as a school in 1931 and is now a storage barn.

President Robert H. Wright's report on Joyner School was recorded as part of the May 31, 1918 Board of Trustees meeting minutes.

Additions
1916-1918 - Converted into a 3 room structure.
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Laundry Building

Built
1928
Architects
George Berryman, Raleigh, NC
History
In 1928, a new laundry building was built near the present Flanagan Building. In 1944 the Executive Committee of the Board of Trustees made the following motion regarding the use of the laundry:
The services of the college laundry be restricted to full time faculty and staff members residing on the campus and the heads of families residing off the campus. Those not heads of families residing off campus may send personal laundry only. Also City School Critic teachers supplemented by the college and college physician. No ex or retired faculty or staff members permitted.
Three additions, including one in 1960, were built to facilitate an increase in the load of laundry. A nearby garage was converted into an office and distribution center for the laundry in 1962.

The following press release regarding Walter E. Boswell was issued Dec. 22, 1966:

ECC Laundry Supervisor Retires After Nearly 40 Years

After nearly 40 years of service, an East Carolina College administrator who served under all six of ECC's presidents has retired.

W.E. Boswell, supervisor of the college laundry, started his retirement with the beginning of the Christmas recess last weekend.

He joined the college staff in 1928 during the administration of the late Dr. Robert H. Wright, first president of the college.

Under Boswell's supervision the campus laundry has grown over the years to keep pace with one of the state's fastest-developing institutions. Today the laundry serves a campus community of some 9,000 students and nearly 1,350 employees.

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Malene G. Irons Building

Other names
Developmental Evaluation Clinic
Built
1969/70
Construction cost
$337,317
Gross sq. ft.
8,806
Assignable sq. ft.
5,454
Architects
Lyles, Bissette, Carlisle & Wolff, Raleigh, NC
Namesake
Malene Grant Irons graduated from ECTC in 1935. She began her medical training at the Medical College of Virginia in 1937. She received her degree of Doctor of Medicine in 1941. In 1949 she received an award for outstanding achievement by the Alumni Association of ECTC. Sixteen years later in 1965 she was appointed as the first director of the Developmental Evaluation Clinic for handicapped children at ECC.

In March 1969 when the building was first being built, Dr. Irons was very supportive and worked very hard to show administration that this facility was needed for better educating the students. After the completion of this building, ideas for the ECU Medical School started to surface.

History
In 1964, ECU established its Developmental Evaluation Clinic, to provide diagnostic evaluation and effective treatment for handicapped children, operating from a former ECU faculty residence building, now the Career Services Building. It was also meant to provide experience for Psychology, Social Welfare, Nursing, and Education students.

In March 1969, contracts were awarded for the construction of a new building for the clinic. Chapin Construction Co. of Greenville won the general contract to build the 8,800 sq. ft. building which is now known as the Irons Building. It was built on a tract of land bordered by NC 43 and US 264 by-pass and contains examination and observation rooms, psychological testing rooms, classrooms, laboratories and a kitchen. The building was dedicated on September 18, 1974, as the Malene G. Irons Building.

Additions
1969 - A modular unit was added with gross square feet of 1,250.

1985 - A satellite clinic was added at 1805 Charles Street with gross square feet of 4,858.

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Mamie E. Jenkins Building

Other names
Infirmary, Alumni
Built
1909
Construction cost
$9,205
Gross sq. ft.
3,787
Assignable sq. ft.
3,003
Architects
Hook & Rogers, Charlotte, NC
Namesake
Mamie E. Jenkins (1875-1957), an English teacher for 36 years, played an important role in the development of what we now know as ECU, from its beginning in 1909 until she retired in 1946. Miss Jenkins attended Trinity College, now known as Duke University, in 1896 and received her BA degree. She was also one of the first four female graduates of that College. She received her Master's degree at Columbia University and while teaching, did graduate work at the University of Wisconsin as well as other schools. She was also one of the first three faculty members to be elected to serve at East Carolina Teachers Training School. She edited the Training School Quarterly from 1914-1922, was faculty advisor for the Techo Echo newspaper which she helped to establish, and originated the school motto "To Serve."
History
One of the six original buildings, this small brick structure with sweeping arches and red tile roof exhibits the Spanish-mission style of architecture which was prevalent on the early campus. The building served as an infirmary until 1929, then became the home economics practice house and later housed the Institute of Coastal & Marine Resources.

In May of 1954 the alumni building was officially named in honor of Mamie E. Jenkins.

In 1993 the ECU Board of Trustees looked at adding several buildings, including the Mamie E. Jenkins Building, to the National Registry of Historic Places. The buildings were not added to the registry due to concerns over future construction and renovations that might be necessary.

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McGinnis Theatre

Other names
McGinnis Auditorium
Built
1951
Construction cost
$361,775
Gross sq. ft.
23,892
Assignable sq. ft.
16,575
Architects
A.J. Maxwell, Goldsboro, NC
Namesake
Howard Justus McGinnis (1882-1971), a Ph.D. recipient from George Peabody College, was a psychology professor (1927-1944) and registrar (1928-1947) at East Carolina. From May 1944 through August 1946, Dr. McGinnis served as acting president of the college. After Dr. Dennis Cooke was hired as president, Dr, McGinnis continued as registrar another year and then became director of field services until his retirement in 1950.
History
Built adjacent to Wahl-Coates School (the Practice School), this auditorium was to serve as the school auditorium and the college theatre. Today Wahl Coates School and now attached auditorium are being used as the Messick Theatre Arts Center and they now house the Theatre Arts Department. In 1981, the auditorium underwent considerable renovations.

The following is an excerpt from the October 27, 1994 addition of the Daily Reflector.

Like many theaters, it seems ECU's McGinnis Auditorium is haunted.

Some people, mostly students, say the ghost of Dr. Lucille Charles, a professor from 1946 to 1953, lives in the building.

Dr. Charles makes noise and flies by, as reported by a group of students who say they saw a figure in white float across the stage. They followed it down the hall into an empty room which was unnaturally cold.

Another night during rehearsals, students heard a door slamming repeatedly. Before they could reach it, the lights went out. As they came back on, the slamming stopped.

Others have felt cold spots, seen lights go on and off, briefly smelled perfume and heard loud,lengthy noises. Things have disappeared and suddenly reappeared.

Some believe they have captured her voice, singing, on tape. A recording was made of a woman playing the piano and a man was singing. When they re-played the tape, a woman was heard singing along. They tried it again, the results were the same.

Another version said that only a woman was heard. Still another claims there was no singing, only the piano.

In another incident a student heard a piano playing. When he approached the room, the playing stopped and the room was empty. As he turned to leave he closed the door and the music resumed. Opening the door, he found the room empty and quiet.

One of the stranger incidents involved a man who brought two dogs in his arms, to the auditorium. When he entered a certain room, the dogs began to bark and whimper. They jumped out of his arms, ran wildly for a few seconds, and then dashed out of the room. When he tried to take them back, they would not go. The owner persisted, but they would not enter the room.

Additions
1964 - air conditioning, Fenner & Proffitt, Wilson, NC
1981 - renovations
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Mendenhall Student Center

Other names
Student Union Building
Built
1974
Construction cost
$2,935,000
Gross sq. ft.
116,900
Assignable sq. ft.
80,480
Architects
Carter Williams, Raleigh, NC
Namesake
Cynthia Anne Mendenhall was born August 21, 1922 in Fort Knox, Kentucky to James Edward and Cora Redding Mendenhall. She received her B.S. degree in Business Administration from Woman's College of North Carolina. She also spent a year at UNC-CH and obtained a B.A. degree in Sociology and Recreation and pursued further graduate study at the University of Colorado and the University of Wisconsin. She joined the staff at ECU in 1954 as the first director of the Student Union and initiated numerous recreational activities. Ms. Mendenhall succumbed to cancer February 3, 1972.
History
Built at what was once the corner of Eighth and Charles Streets, Mendenhall Student Center gives students a building all their own. The building consists of three floors, one of which is below ground. This recreational facility features Hendrix Theatre, an 800 seat film and lecture facility; eight bowling alley lanes; facilities for table games; a crafts center; coffee house; lounge; and listening rooms. The second floor is used for meetings and to display artwork. Mendenhall is located on the southwestern campus next to Joyner Library. The building was dedicated on February 9, 1974.
Additions
1989 and 1990 - Built facility for WZMB which was founded by ECU Media Board and a WZMB grant - 30,000 square foot addition costing $4 million
1993 - Renovation to the snack bar "The Spot"
1997 - Updated and remodeled the Dining Center
1998 - Expanded computer lab
2000 - Replaced carpet, wall coverings, and furnishings in the Underground and the Cynthia Lounge
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Messick Theatre Arts Building

Other names
Drama Building
Built
1927
Construction cost
$57,364.86
Gross sq. ft.
35,038
Assignable sq. ft.
19,924
Architects
George Berryman, Raleigh, NC
Namesake
John Decatur Messick (1897-1993), a native North Carolinian and a Ph.D. Graduate of New York University was president of East Carolina from 1947 through 1959. During his term as president, the school's name was changed from East Carolina Teachers College to East Carolina College, sixteen new buildings were built, and enrollment increased from 1600 to 6500 students.

2. Francis Wahl (1895-1984), a master's recipient from the Teachers College at Columbia University, was a supervising teacher (1925-1961) and the principal (1936-1961) of the Wahl-Coates Laboratory School of East Carolina.

3. Dora E. Coates (1891-1974), was a native North Carolinian and a master's recipient from the Teachers College at Columbia University. She worked as a critic (or supervising) teacher from 1922 until 1929 here at ECU. Then she taught in the English Department until her retirement in 1951.

History
Constructed in 1927, the building replaced the original Model School and has undergone several renovations, additions, and name changes. The sweeping arches of the building continue the spanish-mission style architecture of the early campus buildings. In 1959, the building was named Wahl-Coates in honor of Francis Wahl and Dora E. Coates who each served the school for 30 years. In 1972, Greenville and ECU in a cooperative venture opened Wahl-Coates Public School relieving ECU of actually providing elementary classroom space. The building now houses the Theatre Arts Department and the attached McGinnis Auditorium, built in 1951-52.
Additions
1929 - construction of second unit (19,360 gross square feet)
1949 - addition of the training school wing
1951 - theatre addition
1971 - added a laboratory
1972 - fire alarm replacement/repairs
1979 - repaired roof
1981 - new stage and auditorium renovations (new heating and air ventilation)
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Minges Coliseum/Williams Arena

Other names
ECC Field House
Built
1966
Construction cost
$2,467,671.66
Gross sq. ft.
109,068
Assignable sq. ft.
64,034
Architects
F. Carter Williams
Namesake
The building honors the following members of the Minges family: Mr. and Mrs. M.O. Minges and their children Martha Minges Bass, Forrest, Hoyt, John, Max and Ray Minges. M. O. Minges was the founder of the Pepsi-Cola Bottling Co. of Greenville. Since the company was founded it has been a family ran business. In 1966, John Minges, the president of the Pepsi-Cola Bottling Company of Greenville, donated $25,000. This was the largest single private gift ever received by the 58-year-old college. Afterward the ECC trustees' voted unanimously to name the building after the M. O. Minges family, not only for the donation but for the growing support that they offered.

In April 1994, Minges Coliseum was rededicated to Walter L. Williams and became known as Williams Arena. Mr. Williams was the first to donate $1 million for the renovation of the Coliseum. He is also president and founder of Trade Oil Company and has 29 stores throughout North Carolina under the Trade Mart name.

History
Minges Coliseum grew out of plans by the college/university to put ECC athletics further into the national arena. In 1965 the college got the "green light" to advertise the bids after the NC Advisory Budget Commission approved the sale of $1,640,000.00 in bonds to help finance the gym. It had a proposed budget of $2,340,000, $700,000 of which came direct from state appropriation.

Following its construction, Minges Coliseum won several architectural awards including one by the American Institution of Steel Construction, one of only 15 winners nationwide out of 150 entries. Bethlehem Steel produced a promotional brochure regarding the construction of the building. It was dedicated January 27, 1968, at the ECU-West Virgina basketball game. Followed by the game was a dinner party, which include big names such as Mr. Lloyd Jordan, commissioner of the Southern Conference.

In 1994, major renovations were put into place for Minges Coliseum. Almost $11.5 million was spent to replace the playing surface of Minges, add seating to seat 7,500 people, add air-conditioning, new lighting, and new locker rooms.

Additions
1967 - Parking Lot Addition
1989 - Parking Lot Addition
1994 - $11.4 million was spent in renovations of Minges Coliseum and it was rededicated in honor of Mr. Walter Williams and his generous contribution to the renovations.
1999 - Irwin Belk offered a sculpture as part of an endowment pledge to the school. Jodi Hollnagel, a faculty member of the ECU School of Art, made a 3-ton bronze pirate, standing at least two stories tall, raising his cutlass toward the end zone of Dowdy-Ficklen Stadium, in the plaza right outside of Minges Coliseum.
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Model School

Other names
Training School
Built
1914
Razed
ca. 1927
Architects
Hooks & Rogers, Charlotte, NC
History
The original mission of East Carolina Teachers Training School was to train teachers for Eastern North Carolina. To facilitate this goal a practice school was built in 1914. The city provided the funds for the construction of the original four-room model school and later East Carolina repaid the city for the construction. Students could walk to the school through the wooded western portion of campus, and develop their teaching skills by working with Greenville youngsters. A second story was added to the building in 1917. Construction of the new practice school (later called Wahl-Coates) in 1927 gave student teachers a more modern building.
Additions
1917 - second story addition, Willard G. Rogers
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Monument to Anatomy Donors

Built
2003
History
A monument depicting hands reaching skyward has been given anonymously to the Brody School of Medicine through the Medical Foundation of ECU. The monument, on the south shore of Lake Laupus on the medical campus near a walking path, was presented in memory of the many people whose anatomical remains were donated to the School of Medicine to help students learn anatomy. [ People, September 2003, p. 2]
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Parks & Recreation Building

Other names
Leisure Systems Studies House
Built
ca. 1925
Gross sq. ft.
3,500
Assignable sq. ft.
2,049
History
This brick house was one of the old homes acquired by ECU for institutional use. It contains the Parks and Recreation Department. The house is located on 9th Street and was acquired by ECU ca. 1974.
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Pirate Club

Other names
Century Club
Built
1965
Construction cost
$60,000
Gross sq. ft.
5,222
Assignable sq. ft.
3,815
Architects
Dudley & Shoe, Greenville, NC, see also manuscript collection in Special Collections
Namesake
The Century Club was the official name adopted for a new organization designed to assist and promote the athletic and cultural programs at ECC in September 1962. This building was first named the Century Club Building.
History
The building was to be used by both the Athletic Department and the Century Club. It is located on the south side of the football stadium, and set half within the enclosure for the stadium. The building is a simple one story rectangular design. The architectural style is contemporary, with the design objective to provide space in a simple form. Structural steel frames were used exposed to blend with the stadium structure. The building is mainly one large assembly room, used primarily for football training activities.
Additions
1992 - Ticket office addition
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Power Plant

Other names
Power House
Built
1909
Architects
Hook & Rogers, Charlotte, NC
History
The first laundry was intended to be located in the Refectory (later known as the Dining Hall) as in one set of architectural plans. It was actually included in the Power Plant Building, located between Jarvis Hall and Austin building, but set back somewhat behind them. In 1913, the part of the Power Plant used for laundry was extended on the eastern side, doubling the floor space. This addition cost $3,000. The power plant building was eventually joined to the original Dining Hall by a connecting covered walkway. In 1927-1928, the Power Plant and Laundry moved into larger quarters. The area was converted into a lobby and lounge area and has been used for a campus post office in more recent years.
Additions
1913 - addition to the east side of the building
1923 - "Work has begun on the auxiliary power plant." East Carolina Teachers College News, Vol. I, No. 2, November 5, 1923.
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Ragsdale Hall

Other names
Ragsdale Faculty Club and Ragsdale Dormitory
Built
1923
Construction cost
$146,168
Gross sq. ft.
41,144
Assignable sq. ft.
23,579
Architects
H.A. Underwood, Raleigh, NC
Namesake
William Henry Ragsdale (1855-1914) a Wake Forest Graduate, was superintendent of Pitt County Schools from 1891-1898 and again from 1900-1914. He was also one of the key organizers of the campaign to establish a normal school in Eastern North Carolina. After the establishment of East Carolina Teachers Training School (ECTTS), he served on the Board of Trustees, was a member of the faculty, and taught Public School Administration.

A brief biography of W.H. Ragsdale appeared in the April, May, June 1914 issue of the Training School Quarterly. It is as follows:

W.H. Ragsdale was born in 1855 and received his training at a time when the general impression prevailed that anybody who could read and write and cipher could teach school. But in that day there were some men and women teaching school whose chief qualifications were not their attainments in scholarship but a warm heart, a big soul, and a strong personality. Ragsdale, the boy, came under the spell of some one of this type who inspired him to prepare himself as well as possible for life's work, and he was graduated from Wake Forest College with distinction.

He began his work as teacher in a private boy's school in Scotland Neck. He soon came from that school to Greenville and engaged in the school work in a private school familiarly known a dozen years ago as the Male Academy.

The history of his work here is indelibly written on the hearts and interpreted in the lives of the men who were the boys of those days and his scholars. His success as a teacher is best told in the loving terms in which "his boys" invariably delight to speak of their teacher and friend.

While he was still engaged in the private school work he was elected Superintendent of Public Instruction of Pitt County. At that time a County Superintendent was not expected to do much work, and the salary was much smaller than the work.

Mr. Ragsdale kept up the duties of his school and of his new office to which he had been elected until the Greenville Graded Schools were established in 1903. From that time on he devoted his entire time and energies to the county schools. A correct estimate of his work in this County cannot be made, but a comparison of conditions expressed in figures will give some insight into his work.

In 1899 the white school census was 5,157 and the number enrolled in the schools was 2,975. The average school term was 73 days. The value of the school property for the white race was $7,540. As late as 1903 the best public school building in the County, including the towns, was the one-room frame building which was the home of the Greenville Male Academy, to which reference has been made.

In 1912 the white school census was 6,965 and the enrollment was 5,665. The average school term was 101 days for the schools generally and 160 days for the local tax districts. The value of the school property for the white race was $85,000.

These figures tell the story of tireless labor, undaunted energy, prophetic vision, hope, love and diplomacy. His optimism and faith in humanity inspired men and women, both teachers and citizens, to do their best and to be their best. His persistent and cheerful efforts in behalf of the children of all the people met with a glad response. To him a little child was greater than anything of a material nature, greater than his own salary and his own comfort, and to-day the children of this County rise up and bless his memory.

The loss sustained in the death of Mr. Ragsdale is keenly felt in his town, in his County, and in the educational circles of the State, but it is not felt more keenly anywhere than in the faculty of the Training School. Just what he meant to us in our work cannot be told in words. He was with this school in its beginning -- even long before it had a beginning he was sowing the seed which ripened into an irresistible demand for it

History
The first wing of Ragsdale was built in 1923 and provided urgent needed housing for female faculty members. The facility has served as a dormitory for students, the first home for the School of Medicine, administrative offices, and currently houses the Graduate School and Sponsored Programs.

1947 - Three wings on the second and third floors house approximately 40 women of the faculty and administrative staff. On the east wing live superintendant of grounds J.L. Russel, director of the bookstore Z.W. Frazells, and a small group of male students. Nine veterans and their wives live downstairs in the west wing and have rooms large enough to be called apartments. Each unit is separated due to some slight remodeling.

1988 - Social Work moves into Ragsdale Hall after previously being housed in Carol Belk Building.

January 1996 - The Department of communication moved from Ragsdale into Erwin. Women's studies, Writing Across the Curriculum, and the Faculty Development Center moved into Ragsdale.

Additions
1938 - basement was renovated to house 30 male students
1953 - a wing was added onto the building
Other renovations that took place over time include plumbing, removal of certain walls, and electrical upgrades.
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Rawl Building

Built
1959
Construction cost
$831,030
Gross sq. ft.
72,814
Assignable sq. ft.
46,841
Architects
A.J. Maxwell, Goldsboro, NC
Namesake
Edwin E. Rawl (1902-1958), a Greenville businessman, was a member of the ECU Board of Trustees (1953-1958). Rawl played an active role in community affairs and was the founder of the Pirate Club.
History
This three story T-shaped building was the first entirely new classroom building to be constructed since Flanagan building was built in 1939. The building originally housed the Business, Psychology, Art and Education Departments. An Art Gallery on the third floor was named after Kate W. Lewis, the first head of the Art Department and an original faculty member. The building was dedicated on March 13, 1960.
Additions
1960 - Rawl Annex, A.J. Maxwell, Goldsboro, NC
Because of the need for space at East Carolina College, which was rapidly growing, Rawl Annex was built in 1960 and attached directly to the back of the Rawl classroom building. Upon its opening it provided office space for the Public Relations and Extension Division of the College as well as Testing Office of the Psychology Department and the Graduate Division.
1962 - First floor lounge named for Elmer R. Browning
air conditioning added, first building to be air conditioned
1969 - repaired cracks in the foundation and walls
1994 - renovation of office suites
1996 - better acoustics and improved lighting
1997 - new elevators installed

1997 & 1998 - new fire and smoke detectors installed

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Rivers Building

Other names
Nursing & Home Economics Building
Built
1968
Construction cost
$1,981,252
Gross sq. ft.
73,997 (original)
Assignable sq. ft.
not known
Architects
Dudley & Shoe, Greenville, NC. See Manuscript Collection regarding this firm's records.
Namesake
Thomas Wilson Rivers was a longtime ECU advocate, a world traveler, and a Navy Veteran. In 1987 he made the first $1 million contribution to ECU for academic purposes. The fund was used to create the Foreign Exchange Endowment Fund and Distinguished Professorship, student scholarships for study abroad, and helps fund lecture and faculty travel to overseas conferences.
History
This nearly 84,000 square foot new building was built for the Home Economics Department, now the School of Human Environmental Sciences, and the School of Nursing. It is located adjacent to Fifth Street on the north, and A.J. Fletcher Music Building on the south. It was built on the site of the varsity tennis courts. The School of Human Environmental Sciences occupies the south end of the structure which contains two units connected by enclosed passageways, while the School of Nursing is located in the two-story north end. This building was built as a two-part project, using both state and federal funds, with the north end being started first in 1966 and the south end being started in 1967.

During its earlier years, the School of Nursing was housed in various locations. Initially offices were housed in two rooms in Spilman. It also occupied temporary quarters on the third floor of Rawl, and later Graham.

The building was dedicated at the Founder's Day Celebration on March 5, 1997 and is commonly referred to as the Nursing and Environmental Sciences Building. Helen Rivers McLawhorn, Rivers' daughter, was present at the dedication and spoke on her father's behalf. Helen is a former employee of Academic Library Services.

In 2004 construction began on an $11.9 million project, paid for by the $190 million ECU received in 2000 as part of the North Carolina Higher Education Facilities Bond program, provides 38,000 square feet of new classroom and faculty office space for the School of Nursing and the College of Human Ecology.

The building reopened just before the start of the fall 2004 semester and is home to the School of Nursing and a number of schools within the College of Human Ecology, including: Child Development and Family Relations, Interior Design and Merchandising, Criminal Justice, Social Work and Nutrition and Hospitality Management.

Additions
1996 - A new fire alarm system was installed.
February 7, 1997 - The third floor was added at a cost of $6.7 million.
1998 - The roof was repaired at a cost of nearly $300,000.
2004 - $11.9 million, 38,000 square foot addition
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Scales Field House

Built
1966
Construction cost
$106,348
Gross sq. ft.
14,349
Assignable sq. ft.
11,500
Architects
Dudley & Shoe, Greenville, NC, see manuscript collection in Special Collections
Namesake
Waightstill "Booger" Morehead Scales, Jr. (1924- ), a Greenville native, attended Fishburne Military Academy in Waynesboro Va., where he graduated in 1942. After working for John Flanagan's Buggy Company and the Ford Distributor in Greenville (1946-1948), he went into the insurance business. Scales was an "untouchable" and leading fundraiser in the community and at ECU and he chaired one of Greenville's largest fundraising efforts which resulted in the building of Dowdy-Ficklen Stadium at ECU. Other than raising $278,000 for the construction of Dowdy-Ficklen Stadium, he raised $100,000 for Scales Field House. Booger Scales also served as the first president of East Carolina College the Century Club, now called the Pirate Club.
History
The building was dedicated on January 7, 1968. The building is located conveniently close to the sports playing fields. It contains 8000 feet of floor space and provides dressing rooms, showers, first aid rooms, an athletic library, a meeting room, a study and a space for storage of equipment.
Additions
1971 - First Addition-Office added for head athletic coaches and secretaries, Dudley & Shoe, Greenville, NC
1983 - Addition and Renovations including a large laundry room, general equipment storage room, four offices and a reception room. Also a heating and cooling addition and dressing room renovations.
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Science & Technology Building

Built
2001
Construction cost
$70,590,013
Gross sq. ft.
279,000
Architects
Rich Beale & Blake Talbot
History
The biggest new thing on campus this year - literally - is the Science and Technology Building. Funded by the General Assembly, campus resources and $59,545,000 of East Carolina's share of the higher education bond issue approved in November 2000, the groundbreaking ceremony was held on Founders Day, 2001.

Sitting on a huge swath of land on the Tenth Street side of the central campus, the facility opened for business on the first day of classes of the fall semester, even though students most likely spent their first lab period unpacking boxes of equipment that had been loaded up at the end of the spring semester.

The facility, the largest building on the central campus and the first major project at ECU completed with higher education construction bonds approved by North Carolina voters three years ago, provides a new home for the College of Technology and Computer Science and for the Chemistry Department.

The building was formally opened on October 11, the weekend of the ECU's home football game against UNC-Chapel Hill. That should give students, faculty and staff time to explore its many nooks and crannies -- including a glass-blowing shop and equipment with magnets strong enough to obliterate your credit card information -- and figure out which switches operate which machines.

The building has laboratory and classroom space to house the Chemistry Department and the College of Technology & Computer Science. It is five stories tall and has a mechanical room penthouse. It also houses the new central chilled water plant that will serve the building and ultimately all buildings east of Founders Drive. The boiler plant will be expanded and a 75,000 pound per hour boiler will be added, increasing the number of boilers from three to four.

Information taken from East, Fall 2003, page 6.

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Scott Dormitory

Built
1962
Construction cost
$1.2 million
Gross sq. ft.
98,087
Assignable sq. ft.
73,494
Architects
Eric G. Flannagan, Henderson, NC
Namesake: William Kerr Scott (1896-1958), Governor of North Carolina (1948-1953) and U.S. Senator (1954-1958), known to his friends as 'The Squire of Haw River,' was primarily a farmer.
Upon his election as Governor of the State in 1948, he introduced his "Go Forward" program. State surplus revenue was put to work to overcome the deficit in State services. With the conclusion of his administration, Governor Scott could review a long list of accomplishments. Among projects initiated and completed
14,810 miles of road paved; 8,000 new classrooms; 175 gymnasiums; and 350 school lunchrooms had been constructed.

After Scott graduated from State College receiving a BS in agriculture, he served one year as an agent for emergency food production for the US Department of Agriculture; and in 1918-19 in the Field Artillery, US Army. In July 1919, he married Mary Elizabeth White and settled in Alamance County. He served as farm agent for that county, later as Master of the North Carolina State Grange, and in 1936 was elected State Commissioner of Agriculture, which post he resigned to run for Governor.

History
Scott Dormitory was opened for use in 1962 to house male students. Continuing in the same style as nearby Aycock and Jones Dormitories, this four story U-shaped dormitory includes a recreation area in the basement, exposed walkway's on each floor, and houses 500 students. The building was dedicated on November 3, 1963.
Additions
1975 - windows replaced
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Slay Dormitory

Built
1949
Construction cost
$512,000
Gross sq. ft.
34,269
Assignable sq. ft.
24,597
Architects
Eric G. Flannagan, Henderson, NC
Namesake
Dr. Ronald J. Slay (1890-1948) was a Science professor (1923-1947), the second director of the Science Department, and the first academic dean at East Carolina. A Ph.D. graduate of Columbia University, he was also the first to hold a Ph.D. in science at East Carolina. Dr. Slay was recognized as a leading promoter for the expansion of East Carolina. In 1950, the Student Legislature requested that the building be named in his honor as "a leading figure in the growth and development of the college" from 1923 to 1947.
History
Groundbreaking took place in 1948 with construction completed in early 1949. This 2 story, U - shaped dormitory was built to house 216 men and in 1961 the building was converted into a women's dormitory. Slay Dormitory is also recognized as being the last building on campus constructed with a tile roof.
Additions
1954 - Annex
1961 - Converted to women's dormitory, James W. Griffith, Jr., Greenville, NC
1961 - addition of T-shaped colonial style lobby, James W. Griffith, Jr., Greenville, NC
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Speight Building

Other names
Education & Psychology Building
Built
1965
Construction cost
$480,824
Gross sq. ft.
50,562
Assignable sq. ft.
31,450
Architects
R.N. Rouse & Co., Goldsboro, NC
Namesake
J. Brantley (1914-1971) and Carrie Gardner Speight (1904-1972) were residents of Pitt County. Brantley graduated from North Carolina State University with a degree in agriculture. With his degree and the help of his wife, they established the Speight Seed Farm. They were recognized as the first producers and distributors of hybrid seed corn, as well as new outstanding tobacco varieties. Brantley was a significant leader in various agriculture organizations, and a member of the Board of Trustees of the Consolidated University of North Carolina. In addition to assisting Brantley with farming Carrie played an active role in community activities.
History
Located on Fifth Street, this yellow brick classroom building houses the School of Education and offices of the ECU Teaching Fellows Program, the Model Clinical Teaching Program, and ENCCARE. It contains 22 classrooms, 45 offices, testing rooms, laboratories and related facilities. The building was dedicated on February 17, 1974.

1992 - the Reading Room was named after Professor Emeritus Keith Holmes

1993 - James W. Batten Conference Room dedicated (Room 129)

Additions
1980 - elevator installed for ADA compliancy
1998 - cooling tower replaced
1998-99 - added computer technology and hook-ups to most classrooms
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Spilman Building

Other names
Administration
Built
1930
Construction cost
$50,000
Gross sq. ft.
16,720
Assignable sq. ft.
9,741
Architects
George Berryman, Raleigh, NC
Namesake
John Barham Spilman (1886-1935), a native North Carolinian and a Wake Forest graduate, served as superintendent of schools in Beaufort and Lexington North Carolina and taught school in Texas for several years. From 1904 to 1912, he was Business Manager of Draughon's Business College in Nashville, Tennessee. Spilman became treasurer of East Carolina College in 1912 and served in this position until his death in 1935. By virtue of his position as treasurer, he was also a member of the Board of Trustees. As the duties of treasurer expanded, Spilman's wife, Johnetta Webb Spilman, was hired to assist him in 1922.
History
Constructed in 1930 for additional administrative offices for the growing college, Spilman Building is of Spanish - mission design which blends in well with the original campus buildings. The 5th Street entrances to Spilman display curved arches with detailed architectural designs of a fan window and stylized brick detail. Spilman continues to house the administrative offices. The building was dedicated in memory of J.B. Spilman in May 1954. In 1966, Mrs. Frances Spilman Facci donated $1000 in honor of her father to start a scholarship fund for a student who was majoring in business.

Spilman continues to house the administrative offices, including the Chancellor's Office and the Division of Academic Affairs. In 1993, the building was named to the ECU Campus Historical District along with several other original buildings on campus.

Additions
1959 - addition, Harles & Edwards, Rocky Mount, NC
1968 - renovated
1998 - grounds landscaped and windows replaced
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Student Health Center

Other names
Infirmary
Built
1930
Construction cost
$100,000 estimate
Gross sq. ft.
11,744
Assignable sq. ft.
9,263
Architects
George Berryman, Raleigh, NC
History
As the student population grew, a large facility was needed to meet student health needs. A new tile-roofed structure with the medical emblem over the doorway was constructed ca. 1929. The building blends in well with other early campus buildings with the spanish motif architecture. Additions to the rear of the building are being made.

For more information about the Student Health Center's services go to their webpage.

Additions
August 27, 1999 - construction began on an addition to the Student Health Center- addition will provide more treatment rooms and storage area for medicines
1960 - additions and alterations-enlarge waiting room, add 12 treatment rooms, and install new cabinets, electric dumbwaiter, and nurse call system.
1952 - plumbing and electrical improvements
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Student Recreation Center

Built
1994
Construction cost
$16,000,000
Gross sq. ft.
150,227
Assignable sq. ft.
100,000
Architects
Corley, Refoot and Zack of Chapel Hill, NC
History
The Student Recreation Center offers recreational activities for the students and faculty. This large fitness center is located on west campus at the corner of Ninth and Cotanche. The center is more than three acres wide and contains many divisions that are eye catching at first glance. The weight training facility has many machines to compliment its structure and size, free weights, and several cardiovascular workouts. The indoor swimming pool is equipped with eight lanes, while the 20 ft. x 40 ft. outdoor pool has an area for sunbathing and recreational play. On the second floor, there is a three lane track, a stretching area, seven racquet courts which line one side of the forum, six sports forums (basketball courts), and three aerobic studios. For a cool drink or an energy booster, the Recreation Center, provides a student store called the "Center Court" for the benefit of all who use the the Student Recreation Center. It is constructed of red brick to complement the other buildings on campus.
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Taylor-Slaughter Alumni Center

Built
1942
Construction cost
$100,000 purchase est.
Gross sq. ft.
4,728
Assignable sq. ft.
3,600
Architects
not known
Namesake
Luther M. "Luke" Taylor graduated from ECU in 1957. He worked in West Palm Beach, Florida with the import-export businesses between Florida and Cuba until the Cuban Embargo in 1961. Thereafter he attended Stetson University and received his law degree in 1963. He then established a successful law practice, L.M. Taylor Lawyers, in North Palm Beach, Florida. Taylor has been a member of the Board of Directors of the East Carolina Alumni Association as well as member of the Chancellor's Society. A former recipient of the Outstanding Alumni Award, he is currently serving on the Board of Directors for the ECU Foundation.

Edward Marvin Slaughter, Jr. (Aug. 16, 1926-Aug. 3, 1987), received a BS degree in History from ECU in 1950 and taught at Boone Trail High School and Angier High School for 2 years. In 1953, he began wholesale distribution of tiles in Norfolk, Virginia in addition to teaching. At the time of his death, he was owner operator of Southern Tile Distribution Company of Richmond and Norfolk, Virginia, on the Board of Directors for the Chesapeake Bank & Trust Company and of the Cruise International Travel Agency, and was Director of Taylor-Parker Wholesale Distributing Company of Norfolk. Slaughter had been a member of the Board of Directors of the East Carolina Alumni Association (and President from 1983-84) and the ECU Foundation, a member of the Chancellor's Society, as well as a recipient of the Outstanding Alumni Award in 1979.

Mr. Taylor and Mr. Slaughter donated approximately $50,000 each for the purchase of this house.

History
This distinguished Georgian brick structure located at 901 East Fifth Street was purchased by East Carolina Alumni Association on Dec. 10, 1979. It was built in the early 1940's for Helen Forbes White Hawes who lived there until her death. The house contains 3,600 square feet of floor space and currently houses the offices of Alumni Relations & Institutional Advancement. Both of these offices provide approximately $90,000 yearly for academic scholarships. The Board of Directors for the Alumni Association meets three times per year and other members meet once in the spring. At this meeting officers for the association are elected. The building was dedicated on May 3, 1980.
Additions
1980 - renovations for office space
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Todd Dining Hall

Built
1994
Construction cost
$5.4 million
Gross sq. ft.
35,400
Assignable sq. ft.
35,000
Architects
Calloway, Johnson, & Moore of Winston
Namesake
This building was named after Richard Cecil and Clauda Pennock "Sweetheart" Todd. Dr. Richard Todd, history professor emeritus at ECU, taught at ECU for 27 years before retiring in 1977. Both he and his wife have provided a number of scholarships, fellowships, and financial aid programs to help fund 22 programs. Professor Todd was also director of the History Honors Program for 14 years and faculty advisor for Phi Sigma Pi honor fraternity. Dr. Todd was also the first non-alumnus to receive the ECU Outstanding Alumni Award in 1983.
History
On August 24, 1994 Todd Dining Hall opened it's doors to students for the first time. This facility is located on College Hill Drive and can seat 625 people in the main dining room and 125 more people in a private dining room, which is know as Sweetheart's. Sweetheart's is a restaurant style facility with a host and waiters. Sweetheart's features a full buffet, four different salads, a selection of hot and cold sandwiches, deserts, and a soup and salad bar. Sweetheart's is also decorated to create a more relaxing atmosphere.

The building was designed along with the original university architectural style and has red clay tiled roof, arched windows, and elaborate archways. Inside it has a full service kitchen and bakery. The building was paid for by proceeds from ECU Dining Services, a self-supported operation. This is also the first major building to receive it's name before completion of construction.

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Tyler Dormitory

Other names
White Elephant
Built
1969
Construction cost
$1,684,000
Gross sq. ft.
96,105
Assignable sq. ft.
68,684
Architects
Stinson, Hall, & Hines of Winston
Namesake
Arthur Lynwood Tyler (1896-1978), a Virginia native, graduated from Henderson, NC high school and attended UNC-CH for one year. Upon leaving college he joined Anchor Stores Company in Henderson and soon became manager. Mr. Tyler served two years in field artillery during World War I. After the war he was elected president of Anchor Stores in 1923. In 1932 he became partner in the Belk-Tyler Company in Rocky Mount. He was appointed to East Carolina's Board of Trustees in 1947 and later served as chairman of the board from 1955 to 1959. Mr. Tyler retired in 1970 at which time he was chairman of the board of Belk's Store Services, Inc.
History
The building was dedicated on December 6, 1970. Tyler Dormitory, a ten-story structure, is located on the "Hill" and was built as part of the 1967 capital improvements appropriation. It was referred to as the White Elephant. The facility houses approximately 500 male students.

In 1989, two residents of Tyler Hall decided to bring a little life into the halls of the fifth floor. They wanted to paint murals on the walls in the hallway, so they got it approved by Student Housing and painted the murals.

Additions
In 1970, Tyler Hall was renovated to accommodate women students. Among the additions were two counselor suites with kitchenettes, two offices, an intercommunications system, renovated bathrooms, a reception room, and laundry facilities were added to floors 2 through 9.
In 1989, ECU spent $314,500 for the refurbishing of Tyler, Scott, Belk, and Aycock Dormitories.

In 1992, an energy conservation project was put underway to help make the building more efficient.

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Umstead Dormitory

Built
1955
Construction cost
$650,000
Gross sq. ft.
48,812
Assignable sq. ft.
35,391
Architects
Eric G. Flannagan, Greenville, NC
Namesake
William B. Umstead (1895-1954) served in World War I. He was a lawyer (1921-1923), a Congressman (1932-1936), a US Senator (1946-1948), and Governor (1953-1954) of North Carolina. Umstead played an active part in many church and civic affairs. He was also President of the University of North Carolina Alumni Association and a trustee of the Consolidated University (1945-1954).
History
Umstead Hall was used temporarily to house 310 male students (1955-1960). It was converted into a dormitory for women (1960) by the addition of a lobby and other facilities at the cost of $117,000.

The three-story structure, facing Tenth Street, is very similar to Slay Dormitory. Both buildings were converted into women's dormitories by the same architect and contractor in 1960. Umstead Dormitory's design is Modified Georgian. The walls are solid brick, and the window sills are limestone. The building's U-shaped in plan. The building was dedicated on April 1, 1962.

Additions
1961 - lobby extension built, James Griffith, Jr., Greenville, NC
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Victory Bell

History
The victory bell was used on the USS Broome. It was cast in Philadelphia in 1855 and is made of brass, weighing 382 pounds and measures 24" in height and 28" in width. The USS Broome was a naval destroyer christened on May 14, 1919 and named for USMC Lt. Col. John Lloyd Broome. The ship was decommissioned in 1922 and then re-entered service in 1930. During World War II the ship escorted convoys across the Atlantic. It was sold for scrap in November 1946.

The bell rests on top of a brick column located on the west side of Christenbury Memorial Gym. The bell is a symbol of victory and is rung when ECU wins a game.

In 1951, the East Carolina College Veterans Club began the process to obtain a bell to commemorate ECTC veterans. The group was assisted in the process by business manager Fitzhugh Duncan and Allison Honeycutt of the North Carolina Agency for Surplus Property.

The college, not the Veterans Club, was eligible under Section 2, Public Law 649, 79th Congress to obtain a bell from a decommissioned ship. In a letter dated 16 March 1951 Allison Honeycutt described the procedure to Fitzhugh Duncan:

"If a bell of the type desired is available, the Curator will forward the application for donation through channels to the Judge Advocate General of the Navy, who will notify the Congress of the proposed transfer. After the expiration of thirty calendar days of continuous session of Congress following the date of notification, the Judge Advocate General shall advise the Curator either that the request may be granted or that the request has been disapproved by Congress."
On April 6, 1951 a formal request was made to the Curator of the Navy for a bell:
"East Carolina Teachers College wishes to make application for a ship's bell for use here at the College. The size and type of bell is not of too much importance. We should like to have a bell taken from a ship which was in service during World War II. Students and graduates of this College fought in both World War I and World War II."
In a letter dated 25 July 1951 Lt. Commander Edward M. Davis III, curator of the navy replied:
"I am glad to advise you that inasmuch as thirty days has elapsed since the submission of my request to Congress to donate the bell of the USS BROOME to the East Carolina Teachers College and no prohibitive resolution has been passed, I am now permitted to make the donation."
The Veterans Club paid for the transport of the bell from Washington, D.C. to Greenville. The official presentation of the bell was held on October 10, 1953 at a ceremony during Homecoming. It was dedicated to the students who served in the military during World War II and the Korean Conflict.
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Ward Guest House

Built
1931
Gross sq. ft.
3,085
Assignable sq. ft.
2,800
Namesake
Robert Allen Ward and Margaret Ward from Burlington, NC are long-time ECU supporters who have donated over $500,000 to the Education Foundation. Robert Ward is also a member and secretary of the ECU Board of Trustees. The Ward Sports Medicine and Physical Education Buildings are also named after them.
History
The guest house was donated by the Ward Family in 1992 for special campus visitors to stay for short periods of time. These visitors include the Board of Trustees and commencement speakers. The colonial revival style house was built in 1931. It is a one-and-a-half story red brick house with three bedrooms, a kitchen, steam room, and baths. The house is located at 1201 East Fifth Street on the north side of campus and is currently valued at more than $200,000. Under the Greenville city ordinance no one can stay in the house for more than 14 consecutive days. ECU housekeeping, grounds service, and security will maintain the house as visitors use the building.
Additions
1992 - The Ward family funded the refurbishing and refurnishing of the house.
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Ward Sports Medicine Building

Other names
Physical Education Building
Built
1989
Construction cost
$8 million
Gross sq. ft.
80,283 sq. ft.
Architects
Hakan, Corley & Associates, Inc., Chapel Hill, NC
Namesake
Robert Allen (Bob)and Margaret Ann Cude Ward are both alumni of ECU. Robert, 1962 graduate in business administration, is executive vice president of finance and administration and also director of Unifi Inc. based in Greensboro. The company is one of the largest texturizers of synthetic fibers. Robert Ward has served on the ECU Board of Trustees, the Business Advisory Council for the School of Business, on the Board for the ECU Foundation, Inc., and is a member of the Chancellor's Society. Margaret Cude Ward holds a bachelor's and master's degree in education and taught school in Raleigh. She has also served on the Alumni Board of Directors. Together they have contributed more than $1 million to the University and the Athletics Department.
History
In 1985, ECU was authorized to proceed with advanced planning through the design stage for a sports medicine / physical activities building. Advance planning funds in the amount of $160,000 came from a $2.5 million university-wide reserve fund, appropriated by the 1985 General Assembly for planning capital improvement projects requested by the UNC system.

Completed in 1989, the three story Sports Medicine Complex grew out of a need to expand the existing sports medicine center that was developed in 1971 through adaption of an existing building. Since then, the physical education dept has grown by 5,000 students.

A third renovation began in 1981 to rework the interior, improve and brighten the exterior and add a new roof began. This renovation cost approximately $1.239 million. The renovation included a new auditorium balcony. The existing balcony which ringed three sides of the auditorium was dismantled. The upper windows were bricked up and the stage extended by about 10 feet. The building also received a new elevator.

Additions
1999 - new generator installed
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Whichard Building

Other names
Joyner Library
Built
1923
Construction cost
$80,407
Gross sq. ft.
23,470
Assignable sq. ft.
13,988
Architects
H.A. Underwood, Raleigh, NC
Namesake
After service in France during World War I, David Julian Whichard returned to Eastern Carolina and purchased the Daily Reflector from his father. He served as editor as well as chairman of the board for the Greenville, NC published newspaper. Whichard was a long time supporter of East Carolina--using editorial and news columns to promote the school as well as providing financial support for the school and its students. He also served as President of the Eastern North Carolina Press Association and the North Carolina Association of Afternoon Dailies. Whichard was also active in various civic affairs in the city of Greenville, Pitt County, and the American Legion.

The building was named for Whichard October 23, 1959 at a Board of Trustees meeting and dedicated on May 6, 1962. College president John D. Messick proposed that the building be named after Whichard "in recognition of what Mr. Whichard and his paper have done and are doing and will continue to do." Whichard was responsible for four day student scholarships. Daily Reflector, "ECC Building Named to Honor Publisher," October 24, 1959

History
The stately brick structure with red-tile roof complements the architectural style of earlier campus buildings. Originally constructed to be the library for East Carolina Teachers College, work began in the fall of 1923. A notice in the East Carolina Teachers College News Vol. I, No. 2, November 5, 1923 mentions that:
the Library Building has been staked off and will soon be under way. The building will be well equipped and up-to-date for library service.
The building opened on October 15, 1924. The Class of 1926 purchased and donated a grandfather clock for the main hall. This clock is seen in image P5543 and image P721. The clock has a small plaque inscribed "On time every time, Presented by AB Class of 1926." The clock is currently housed in the administration office of Joyner Library.

In 1954 the building was remodeled to house the Music Department and in 1968 it was converted into office space. Whichard Building was formally dedicated on May 6, 1962. An art gallery in the building was named for Kate W. Lewis, the first head of the Art Department. It has since been moved to the Rawl Building.

Whichard Building was nominated for the National Registry of Historic Buildings, but the university decided to start it's own registry of historic buildings on campus on which the building was placed.

Additions
1954 - conversion to the Music Building, Eric Flannagan & Associates, Henderson, NC
1958 -rehearsal rooms added, Thomas, Harles & Edwards of Rocky Mount, NC
1959 - Whichard Annex built, 25 rooms
1968 - renovated
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White Dormitory

Built
1968
Construction cost
$1.3 million
Gross sq. ft.
82,731
Assignable sq. ft.
57,997
Architects
Stinson, Hall, Hines & Associates of Winston
Namesake
Ruth Allen White (1903-1999) obtained her Normal 2 year degree at East Carolina University (1925-1926). After teaching at Roanoke Rapids School in North Carolina, she returned to ECU to obtain her BA (1939) and MA (1951) degrees. White became the assistant Dean of Women, and was later appointed Dean of Women (1951). She participated actively in community and university activities. In 1951 she received the ECC Alumni Award.
History
White Hall is a ten -story dormitory housing 402 women. The outside brickwork of the building is light cream color with white pre-cast concrete trim around over and under the vertically aligned windows. Glass was used on the exterior of the ground floor. The building was dedicated on November 9, 1969.
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Willis Building

Other names
Regional Development Institute
Built
1974
Construction cost
$392,000
Gross sq. ft.
15,366
Assignable sq. ft.
8,768
Architects
McGee, Scovil & Rairden
Namesake
Thomas W. Willis (March 28,1923-December 25,1983), a native of Farmville, graduated from Wake Forest College in 1948, where he majored in Business Administration. He was Assistant City Manager in Raleigh for two years, then city manager in Newton for five years before joining the staff of the NC Department of Conservation and Development as an "Industry Hunter." After 18 months with this department he returned to Farmville as Executive Director of the Economic Council. Willis was the first director of Regional Development Institute (RDI) in 1964 and served until his retirement in 1981. He played a dynamic role in creating programs and obtaining funding for the institute despite not having any staff and marginal office facilities.
History
Located at the corner of First and Reade Streets, Willis Building is the home of Regional Development Services which includes the Center for Applied Technology, the NC Manufacturing Extension Partnership, and the Small Business & Technology Development Center. The Willis Building was dedicated on December 13, 1974. The Regional Development Institute was established in 1964 to be an inter-disciplinary organization. Its objective is to promote the economic growth of Eastern North Carolina. It provides technical assistance to communities needing additional facilities, commercial expansion, or advisory service on related state and federal programs. The modern structure housing RDI is located at the corner of First and Reade Streets. It contains offices, an auditorium for public speakers and films, conference rooms and a substantial library of North Carolina literature.
Additions
1991 - Roof repairs
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Wilson Dormitory

Other names
Girls Dormitory
Built
1909
Razed
1968
Construction cost
$26,469.12 bid
Architects
Hook & Rogers, Charlotte, NC
Namesake
Claude Wayland Wilson (1867-1922). Graduated from Wake Forest in 1893. Teacher, school principal and superintendent in Eastern North Carolina, 1893-1909. Secretary and Bursar for the Board of Trustees and Director of the summer term at ECTTS, 1909-1922.

The death of C.W. Wilson was reported in Volume 2, page 29 of the Board of Trustees Meeting Minutes. Robert H. Wright recorded the following:

On February 1, C. W. Wilson, Secretary of the Board of Trustees, died suddenly. Wilson was one of the original Board of Trustees, and from the organization of the Board of Trustees until his death was Secretary to the Board. He was Director of the Summer School and in my absence was the person to whom I turned over the administrative duties of the College. His death is the most serious blow the College has ever had when viewed from the internal workings of the institution. He understood thoroughly our state's educational needs, and worked indefatigably to meet those needs. He literally gave his life for the children of North Carolina. In his going our state has lost one of its best citizens and one of its most unselfish public servants. This College has lost one of its strongest workers, one of its best teachers, and one of its most loyal and enthusiastic spirits. His place cannot be filled. In fact we do not want to fill it, but his going necessitates a reorganization and readjustment. We are in the midst of making these changes. The spirit of our teachers and officers as it manifests itself at this trying time to the administration of the College is most loyal and most commendatory and as your executive officer I want to lay these facts before you. Respectfully submitted, Robert H. Wright, President
History
One of four original buildings of East Carolina Teachers Training School, built with Spanish architectural influences. Originally constructed to house women students and faculty. In 1920 the building was renovated: Training School Quarterly, Volume 8, 1920, p. 90:
In the west dormitory the rooms at the east end of the front hall have been remodeled and built into very attractive parlors. The parlors are shut off from the other part of the dormitory by doors. "Moving day" was celebrated on November 12 and 13. The contractors promised President Wright to have the new wing ready by September 28th. President Wright had faith in this promise and word was sent to the girls to come. But the new wing was not finished. It was then promised to be completed in two weeks. The girls were allowed to stay here if they were willing to put up with camping three or four in a room. The rooms were crowded with beds, hardly room enough to move around; when the girls went to visit each other, they had to sit on the beds while being entertained because the rooms were too crowded to contain chairs. At the end of two weeks the building seemed no nearer completion so we were still kept in suspense. At the end of the seventh week the command was given to "move." The day before, November 12, the teachers moved from their quarters on the upper floor on the old front to the first floor of the new wing. They occupy the entire first floor of the new wing and have the same entrance as before. On November 13 the girls moved to the upstairs of the new wing and also occupy the rooms upstairs formerly occupied by the teachers. On that same day and on November 15 was camp cleaning day for those who did not have to move. The girls made the best of the situation and had a jolly time. There never has been a year at the the Training School when the girls had a better chance to know each other than the opportunity afforded this year. The building was demolished in 1968 to make part of the site for the Jenkins Fine Arts Center.
Additions
1920 - remodeled
1924 - building was fireproofed
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Wilson Pergola

Built
1926
Razed
1968
Architects
Claude Wilson
Namesake
Claude Wayland Wilson (1867-1922). Graduated from Wake Forest in 1893. Teacher, school principal and superintendent in Eastern North Carolina, 1893-1909. Secretary and Bursar for the Board of Trustees and Director of the summer term at ECTTS, 1909-1922.

The death of C.W. Wilson was reported in Volume 2, page 29 of the Board of Trustees Meeting Minutes. Robert H. Wright recorded the following:

On February 1, C. W. Wilson, Secretary of the Board of Trustees, died suddenly. Wilson was one of the original Board of Trustees, and from the organization of the Board of Trustees until his death was Secretary to the Board. He was Director of the Summer School and in my absence was the person to whom I turned over the administrative duties of the College. His death is the most serious blow the College has ever had when viewed from the internal workings of the institution. He understood thoroughly our state's educational needs, and worked indefatigably to meet those needs. He literally gave his life for the children of North Carolina. In his going our state has lost one of its best citizens and one of its most unselfish public servants. This College has lost one of its strongest workers, one of its best teachers, and one of its most loyal and enthusiastic spirits. His place cannot be filled. In fact we do not want to fill it, but his going necessitates a reorganization and readjustment. We are in the midst of making these changes. The spirit of our teachers and officers as it manifests itself at this trying time to the administration of the College is most loyal and most commendatory and as your executive officer I want to lay these facts before you. Respectfully submitted, Robert H. Wright, President
History
The pergola was dedicated January 16, 1926 in honor of Dr. Wilson. It stood to the west of Wilson dormitory until 1968 when Old Austin, Wilson and the pergola were razed to make way for Jenkins Fine Arts.
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Wright Building

Other names
Campus Building
Built
1925
Construction cost
$350,000 estimated
Gross sq. ft.
83,265
Assignable sq. ft.
59,662
Architects
H.A. Underwood, Raleigh, NC
Namesake
Robert Herring Wright (1879-1934) was President of East Carolina Teachers Training School from 1908 until his death in 1934. Wright was a graduate of UNC in 1897 and furthered his education at John Hopkins University and Columbia University during the renaissance of Progressive education. He guided East Carolina through its early growth and saw it firmly established as an important North Carolina College.
History
The campus building named in honor of President Wright on March 12, 1936 was completed in 1927 and served as the social and religious facility for the campus. The large brick structure has an arched portico complements earlier campus brick buildings as well as presenting almost identical architectural lines as Whichard Building. Alterations and additions through the decades have enlarged the building so that it now contains an auditorium as well as Dowdy Student Stores and "The Wright Place" food court.

On May 10, 1970, a fire destroyed part of the building. This was reported as the third blaze in two weeks and vandalism was believed to be the cause.

A third renovation of the building was begun in 1981. At a cost of $1.239 million the auditorium was improved, the exterior brightened and a new roof put on. The balcony which ringed three sides of the auditorium was removed and replaced by a new one in the rear of the auditorium. The upper windows were bricked up and the stage was extended approximately 10 feet to provide more adequate space for full orchestras and larger productions. The building also received an elevator.

Additions
1949 - converted to Student Union
1954 - renovated, J.W. Griffith, Jr., Greenville, NC
1963 - renovated, F. Carter Williams, Raleigh, NC
1965 - additions and renovations, F. Carter Williams, Raleigh, NC
1974 - student union moved to newly built Mendenhall Student Union
1977-80 - student store renovations, McGee, Scovil & Rairden, Raleigh, NC
1981-1982 - $1.239 million, auditorium renovation and new roof
1989 - new sound system for auditorium-$75,000
1998 - landscape improvements
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Y-Hut

Built
1925
Razed
1952
Architects
W.C. Lockhart, builder
Namesake
The Y-Hut was built by revenue raised by and contributions to the YWCA on campus.
History
The YWCA had been allowed to open a store in the basement of Austin and sell groceries and fruit to students in 1922. The following article appeared in the first issue of the Teco Echo:

Y.W.C.A. Hut Now Ready The Y.W.C.A. hut is now completed, cleaned up, shavings swept out, windows washed, curtains up, wiring in, lights on -- everything ready for a house warming before the term closes. "All things come to him who waits." A dream which has been in the minds of the students for several years has almost come to pass, and before this reaches the public the girls will be enjoying it.

The hut is a low, red building located almost directly back of the basketball court in the woods on the back campus, with the West end facing Eighth Street. It has six broad double windows, from which beautiful views may be seen, and a large fireplace. On the south end is a kitchenette, which has a real wood stove -- not a smoky oil outfit -- ready for use, which will be a joy and delight to those who fix the eats.

Early in the fall the girls realized they had money enough to begin to make their plans. Through the kindness of two staunch friends in the faculty, a loan was secured. The members of the faculty have proved their interest in many ways. The men wired the hut for lighting and the women contributed the draperies. To complete the furnishing will be a task of love in which every girl in the college shall have a share. Any former students who have had hopes and dreams for the hut may also share in the furnishing. Contributions will be gratefully received.

May the hut be a means of bringing the girls into closer touch with each other.

The Y-Hut was available to students to entertain guests and visitors as well as for activities sponsored by the YWCA. The Y-Hut was located on the tract of land where Joyner Library now stands. The cabin was razed in 1952 to make way for Joyner Library. A second Y-Hut was built to take it's place and was eventually renamed the Ledonia S. Wright Cultural Center.
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