Here at the East Carolina Department of English, we are a vibrant and energetic collection of teachers, scholars, researchers, and writers. If you want to study here, we offer three degrees: a B.A. in English, an M.A. in English with concentrations in eight different areas, and a Ph.D. in Rhetoric, Writing, and Professional Communication. We also offer undergraduate minors in English, Creative Writing, Film Studies, and Linguistics. You can  earn an undergraduate certificate in business and technical communication or teaching English to speakers of other languages (TESOL) and post-baccalaureate certificates in professional communication, multicultural and transnational literatures, teaching English to speakers of other languages (TESOL), and teaching English in two-year colleges.

 
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The diversity of this department is one of its strengths: you can take coursework in literature, creative writing, technical and professional communication, rhetoric and composition, multicultural and transnational literatures, linguistics, theory and criticism, folklore, children's literature, teaching English to speakers of other languages, and film studies. You will also be in contact with faculty who are pedagogical scholars--that is, they study teaching. The Department of English also works closely with the University Writing Program; for more information on the UWP, please visit its pages on the Composition/Writing Foundations Program, the Writing Across the Curriculum Program, and the University Writing Center.

English Department News

For more stories, visit the English News Blog

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Professor Hoppenthaler Travels to Morocco
Last April, ECU English and Creative Writing Professor John Hoppenthaler took a trip to Morocco, where he was a featured reader at the Annual Alhamra Center for Culture and Thought Prose Poetry Symposium in Marrakech. He also traveled to Tamri, a small Berber fishing village in the north, where he visited, read poems and answered questions for high school students

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Dr. Marianne Montgomery’s Chapter Published
Dr. Marianne Montgomery recently authored the chapter “Language and Seafaring in Thomas Middleton and John Webster’s Anything for a Quiet Life” in Travel and Drama in Early Modern England: The Journeying Play, edited by Claire Jowitt and Davis McInnis. Cambridge University Press says the collection “redefines the field by expanding the canon of recognized plays concerned with travel. Re-assessing the parameters

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Dr. Michelle Eble Edits Collection
Dr. Michelle F. Eble’s collection Key Theoretical Frameworks: Teaching Technical Communication for the 21st Century, (co-edited by Angela Haas) was published by Utah State University Press. The work is “links the theoretical with the pedagogical in order to articulate, use, and assess social justice frameworks for designing and teaching courses in technical communication.” Dr. Erin A. Frost contributed the chapter

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Dr. Nikki Caswell Inducted to Hall of Fame
Dr. Nikki Caswell was recently inducted into the Hall of Fame in the College of Education, Health, and Human Services at her alma mater, Kent State University. The award is “the highest honor bestowed upon a former student who graduated within the last ten years from a program within the college. The award recognizes an alumnus who has achieved extraordinary distinction

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Professor Bob Siegel’s play premiers at NY Fringe Festival
Bob Siegel’s new play Stranger than a Rhino was featured during the Oct. 12-20 The New York International Fringe Festival. A director with a reputation for restaging classics takes on Ionesco’s Rhinoceros turning the play inside out to reflect current societal fears of Muslims. A neophyte lands the role of the protagonist. Another cast member begins to wonder about his stake

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Spotlights

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