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Thomas Harriot College of Arts and Sciences
Department of English


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Department Announcements and News

 

DISSH: Digital Innovation and Scholarship in Social Sciences and Humanities Symposium 2015

DISSH-2

SCHEDULE, May 18, 3-4 pm:

The following offerings are specific to the English Department:

GROUP 1 (Janice Hardison Faulkner Gallery, Joyner Library)
Moderator –  Dr. Jill Twark

3:00 – 3:10 pm
Dr. Thomas Herron, Department of English, East Carolina University
“Centering Spenser”: a literary-archaeological website of an Irish castle
I will discuss the past development and future goals of the website, “Centering Spenser: A Digital Resource for Kilcolman Castle,” developed by the ECU University Multimedia Center. The website explores the adopted castle in Ireland of the early modern canonical English poet Edmund Spenser. It includes 3-D reconstructive modeling based on extant ruins and archaeological evidence as well as drawings, photos, maps and various essays on Spenser, his work and his neighbors.

3:40 – 3:50 pm
Dr. Lida Cope, Department of English, East Carolina University
Language documentation: The case of Texas Czech
Texas Czech, an endangered diasporic dialect of Czech, is on the brink of extinction, making its documentation paramount. The Texas Czech Legacy Project at the University of Texas at Austin represents collaborative effort of scholars from UT and East Carolina University. The Project’s ultimate goal is to document and preserve the dying Texas Czech dialect (in its Oral Archive) and make available various artifacts representing the Texas Czech community’s linguistic and ethnocultural heritage (in its Visual Archive). The presenter will introduce the Project’s digital Oral Archive and sample its benefits for the community, education, and research.

 

 

 


Faculty Speaker Series: Ron Hoag

Please join us on Monday, March 16 at noon for our own Ron Hoag’s contribution to the faculty speaker series. We’ll be meeting in Bate 2024 for Ron’s talk entitled “Natural Sabbath: Thoreau’s Mild Sublime.”

Description: Well known to William Cullen Bryant, William Wordsworth, and Henry Thoreau, Edmund Burke’s influential treatise on the Sublime and the Beautiful posits a natural sublime, whose effect on humanity is terror, and a natural beauty, whose effect is pleasure. For Burke, the sublime and the beautiful are mutually exclusive experiences. Bryant, Wordsworth, and Thoreau, however, while acknowledging the daunting power of the sublime, also imply a fundamental link between this power and the paradoxically corresponding power in certain experiences of the beautiful in nature. For these three writers, the wildness in nature is not just sublime but also spiritual, to be reverenced as such if not at the terrifying moment of physical impact then after the fact, upon reflection, when processed as what Wordsworth termed “emotion recollected in tranquility.” “Reflection alone,” says Thoreau in his college essay on “Sublimity,” “can restore to calmness and equanimity.”


McGuckins to give talk on bible translation

image002Ed and Catherine McGuckin of College Station, TX, will speak on “Thirty Years with the Gapapai: Cooperative Bible Translation in Papua New Guinea” from 3:30 to 4:45 p.m. Thursday, Apr. 9, in the Faulkner Gallery of Joyner Library. A reception will follow.

The talk complements an exhibit from Joyner Library’s missionary papers, “Sent out to Serve: North Carolina Women Missionaries, 1870-1963,” March 2 through December in the Special Collections Reading Room on the fourth floor of the library. English department associate professor Laureen Tedesco and a student intern, junior English education major Melanie Koerber, are selecting the exhibit items and writing the display text. Associate professor of history Karen Zipf is contributing her primary research about an African American missionary to North Carolina, Rachel Tucker, a former slave.

The exhibit will include a display of translated Bibles, among them the Gapapaiwa New Testament whose translation the McGuckins.

The McGuckins invested 20 years (1986-2006) in translating the New Testament into an endangered language (Gapapaiwa) in Papua New Guinea, with Wycliffe Bible translators.  Gapapaiwa, classified by linguists as a Melanesian language, is spoken by about 3000 Gapapai people and had never been written down.  The McGuckins surveyed the language, developed a written system for it, and developed working relationships with people in Menapi village who eventually talked over each translation choice with them.  The couple worked with the Gapapai to write down their tribal stories and then use those stories to teach the people to read their own language.  They finished the New Testament translation in 2006, launching it that summer with a celebration incorporating native costumes and traditions.  Since then, the local translation team has begun translating the Old Testament, with consultation and material support from the McGuckins.  Because English is the official language in the schools of this former British colony, Catherine McGuckin advocated for Gapapaiwa to be taught in the primary grades and developed a bilingual curriculum that is now being used in the first three years of school.


English prof, student contribute to “Sent out to Serve” exhibit

“Sent out to Serve: North Carolina Women Missionaries, 1870-1963,” an exhibit from Joyner Library’s missionary papers, opens tomorrow.

LaureenEnglish department associate professor Laureen Tedesco and a student intern, junior English education major Melanie Koerber, are selecting the exhibit items and writing the display text. Associate professor of history Karen Zipf is contributing her primary research about an African American missionary to North Carolina, Rachel Tucker, a former slave.

The exhibit will include a display of translated Bibles, among them the Gapapaiwa New Testament whose translation the McGuckins. The exhibit will remain open through December in the Special Collections Reading Room on the fourth floor of the library.


International Women’s Day upcoming March 4

Tomorrow marks the registration deadline for International Women’s Day events. International Women’s Day will be 8 a.m.-4 p.m. in Mendenhall Great Rooms. The full schedule of events for the day is below, or visit the International Women’s Day registration site for more information.

Schedule of events

 

 

 


Grad publishes short story

2005 creative writing graduate Joseph Horst has published his short story, “Prometheus,” in the anthology Escape Your World by Scribes Valley Publishing. “Prometheus” won 2nd place in the publishing company’s 2014 Short Story Writing Contest.

The short story explores how two men can be so similar yet fight on opposite sides of a goal. What determines the fine line between passion and obsession and what happens if that line is blurred?

Learn more about the collection at Scribes Valley’s page.


Disability Film Series Screening

Playing Thursday February 26th, 2015 @ 5:30 pm in Bate 1032

Open to all ECU students and Faculty

The Diving Bell and the Butterfly (2007)

On 8 December 1995, Bauby, the editor-in-chief of French Elle magazine, suffered a stroke and lapsed into a coma. He awoke 20 days later, mentally aware of his surroundings, but physically paralyzed with what’s known as locked-in syndrome, with the only exception of some movement in his head and eyes. His right eye had to be sewn up due to an irrigation problem. The entire book was written by Bauby blinking his left eyelid, which took ten months (four hours a day). Using partner-assisted scanning, a transcriber repeatedly recited a French language frequency-ordered alphabet (E, S, A, R, I, N, T, U, L, etc.), until Bauby blinked to choose the next letter. The feature film is based on Bauby’s memoir and was nominated for four Academy Awards.

Disability Film Series[2]

 


TALGS conference tomorrow

The TESOL and Applied Linguistics Graduate Student (TALGS) Conference will take place tomorrow, Feb. 21, in the Rivers Building. Registration begins at 8 am; and the conference will run from 9 am-5 pm. Dr. William Grabe and Dr. Fredricka Stoller will be the keynote speakers.


Disability Film Series Screening

Playing Thursday February 19th, 2015 @ 5:30pm in Bate 1032

Open to all ECU students and Faculty

Freaks (1932)

What set this film apart from director Tod Browning’s earlier efforts was the fact that genuine circus and carnival sideshow performers were cast as the freaks: Harry Earls and his equally diminutive sister Daisy, Siamese twins Violet and Daisy Hilton, legless Johnny Eck, armless-legless Randian (who rolls cigarettes with his teeth), androgynous Josephine-Joseph, “pinheads” Schlitzie, Elvira, Jennie Lee Snow, and so on. Upon its initial release, Freaks was greeted with such revulsion from movie-house audiences that MGM spent the next 30 years distancing themselves as far from the project as possible. For many years available only in a truncated reissue version titled Nature’s Mistakes, Freaks was eventually restored to its original release print.

Disability Film Series[2]


“You don’t hate the South?” Faculty Speaker Series presentation

HoppenthalerJohn Hoppenthaler will present “You don’t hate the South? they ask.  You don’t hate it?’:  Natasha Trethewey’s South” at noon Monday, Feb. 23, in Bate 2024 as part of the 2015 Faculty Speaker Series.

John describes his talk as follows: “Natasha Trethewey’s relationship to the South, the place of her birth and where she now chooses to work and live, seems clear; as she writes in a 2005 Virginia Quarterly Review essay, “it is a love/hate relationship.” One of her poetry’s primary occupations is with historical erasure as it relates to the obfuscation of the stories of African-Americans. Complicit in such erasure, the Southern poetic tradition is the battleground wherein Trethewey chooses to make her case.”

The Faculty Speaker Series Committee invites anyone interested to attend for the talk, snacks, and scintillating discussion.