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Department of English


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Grad students present at RCAW

Graduate students Suzan Flanagan, Ed Reges, Rex Rose, and Christina Rowell represented the English department yesterday at Research and Creative Achievement Week. Rowell’s talk was entitled “The Rise of the Fitbit: Body-Monitoring as Habit, Addiction, and Motivation.” Flanagan, Reges, and Rose presented a collaborative project: “Cemetery Rhetoric: A Visual and Textual Lens for Understanding the Past.”

Reges, Flanagan, Rowell, Rose

Reges, Flanagan, Rowell, Rose (from left)

Reges, Rose, and Flanagan

(From left) Reges, Rose, and Flanagan

Rowell

Rowell

 

 

 


Summer/Fall 2015 Registration

Below are the links to fall and spring courses:

Summer Undergraduate: https://docs.google.com/spreadsheets/d/1k8h3M0MDSjO3IhzRzK6r63OUZFV68e3eok3Ynl8vpQo/edit?usp=sharing

Fall Graduate: https://docs.google.com/spreadsheets/d/1VKoqghnLUtsSY_nVrXdPXxrfXY2XzE2y9-HF3cNITKY/edit?usp=sharing

Summer Graduate: https://docs.google.com/spreadsheets/d/1gx7YEFv04IN7Ln0UpiMA5LeqmPfIgLC3PY710fUR9Wg/edit?usp=sharing

Fall Undergraduate: https://docs.google.com/spreadsheets/d/1LMqbhRS1k61r8K0FIuqfiICsMZw-IPLB-OD1SxMSsXQ/edit?usp=sharing

Please contact your advisor for additional details and check Banner for the most updated information.

 

Summer/Fall 2015 Registration Schedule

Friday, March 20th at 1:00 p.m.- Graduate Students, 2nd Degree Students, Honors Students, Teaching Fellows, Maynard Scholars, Approved Veterans

  8:00 am 9:30 am 11:00 am 2:00 pm 3:30 pm
Monday,
March 23rd
121+ 112-120 104-111 95-103 85-94
Tuesday,
March 24th
78-84 74-77 69-73 62-68 54-61
Wednesday,
March 25th
49-53 45-48 40-44 26-39 17-25
Thursday,
March 26th
16 14-15 12-13 0-11 -

The term hours indicates the total number of credit hours earned at the end of the previous semester/session.

NOTES:

  • Course information is subject to change without prior written notice.
  • All university indebtedness must be paid before registering or making schedule changes.


Research and Creative Achievement Week @ ECU begins today!

Several presentations are being offered in various rooms in the Mendenhall Student Center from the 23rd to the 27th. Today’s offerings will include a presentation on the rise of Fitbit (GO64) at 2:30,  another on cemetery rhetoric (GO65) at 2:45 , as well as several others in the Humanities from 1:30-3:15 in Great Room 2.

For more information: https://blog.ecu.edu/sites/rcaw/

 

 


Summer/Fall 2015 Registration

Below are the links to fall and spring courses:

Summer Undergraduate: https://docs.google.com/spreadsheets/d/1k8h3M0MDSjO3IhzRzK6r63OUZFV68e3eok3Ynl8vpQo/edit?usp=sharing

Fall Graduate: https://docs.google.com/spreadsheets/d/1VKoqghnLUtsSY_nVrXdPXxrfXY2XzE2y9-HF3cNITKY/edit?usp=sharing

Summer Graduate: https://docs.google.com/spreadsheets/d/1gx7YEFv04IN7Ln0UpiMA5LeqmPfIgLC3PY710fUR9Wg/edit?usp=sharing

Fall Undergraduate: https://docs.google.com/spreadsheets/d/1LMqbhRS1k61r8K0FIuqfiICsMZw-IPLB-OD1SxMSsXQ/edit?usp=sharing

Please contact your advisor for additional details and check Banner for the most updated information.

 

Summer/Fall 2015 Registration Schedule

Friday, March 20th at 1:00 p.m.- Graduate Students, 2nd Degree Students, Honors Students, Teaching Fellows, Maynard Scholars, Approved Veterans

8:00 am
9:30 am
11:00 am
2:00 pm
3:30 pm
Monday,
March 23rd
121+ 112-120 104-111 95-103 85-94
Tuesday,
March 24th
78-84 74-77 69-73 62-68 54-61
Wednesday,
March 25th
49-53 45-48 40-44 26-39 17-25
Thursday,
March 26th
16 14-15 12-13 0-11 -

The term hours indicates the total number of credit hours earned at the end of the previous semester/session.

NOTES:

  • Course information is subject to change without prior written notice.
  • All university indebtedness must be paid before registering or making schedule changes.


FaculTea: “The John Donne Project”

John Donne Facul Tea Flyer


Voyages hosts “Sexual Seduction in John Donne’s Poetry”

Ilona Bell (Williams College) will deliver the Thomas Harriot Lecture entitled “Sexual Seduction in John Donne’s Poetry” at 7 p.m. March 24 in Wright. This presentation is part of the HCAS Voyages of Discovery Lecture Series. For more information, visit the Voyages of Discovery Lecture Series webpage.

 


Write Place, Write Time

Write Place, Write Time! Get writing help from 8:30-11:30 a.m. Saturday, March 21, at Cornerstone Church, 1095 Allen Road. Sponsored by the Youth Leadership Academy and the ECU Dept of English


First annual DISSH Symposium explores opportunities in digital projects

Renaissance literary scholar and digital humanities expert David Lee Miller will deliver the 2 p.m. plenary talk March 18 at the First Annual Digital Innovation and Scholarship in the Social Sciences and Humanities Symposium (DISSH) at ECU. The meeting runs from 2-6 pm in the Faulkner Gallery at Joyner Library.

This symposium explores the opportunities inherent in digital projects for interdisciplinary and collaborative research and education, hallmarks of the twenty-first century university. Together, the speakers who will inaugurate this annual symposium point to the promise and potential of digital projects to bring people together from across the university setting, creating synergies across academic computing, libraries, departments and interdisciplinary programs.

In addition to Miller’s keynote, the event will feature talks by David Staley (Dept. of History, Director of the Goldberg Center, Ohio State University), Natalie Kononenko (Kule Chair in Ukranian Ethnography, University of Alberta), Jolanda-Pieta (Joey) van Arnhem (Digital Scholarship and Services, College of Charleston Libraries) and Paul Jones (School of Media and Journalism, School of Information and Library Science, UNC-Chapel Hill). A lightning-round of presentations will  create a format for presenters already engaged in digital work from East Carolina University and the surrounding region.

For more information, visit the DISSH website.


The latest from Drs. Erin Frost and Michelle Eble in Present Tense: A Journal of Rhetoric in Society

Excerpt From: Present Tense: A Journal of Rhetoric in Society

Erin A. Frost and Michele F. Eble

Technical Rhetorics: Making Specialized Persuasion Apparent to Public Audiences

Erin A. Frost, Michelle F. Eble, 2015

As rhetoric and technical communication researchers and teachers, we’re often faced with defining exactly what we mean when we use the term technical communication. Current perspectives on what the term technical communication encompasses are broadening well beyond documentation and user manuals that come with technological artifacts (Haas; Grabill and Simmons; Scott, Longo, and Wills; Slack, Miller, and Doak).1 However, defining technical communication more broadly for ourselves or even others in our disciplines doesn’t always change publics’ (e.g., users/stakeholders/lay audiences) perceptions of this information and how it affects their lives and the decisions they make.

In this essay, we argue that “technical rhetorics” is a concept that has affordances for thinking about how to critically communicate with public audiences about specialized information.

Read More HERE


Faculty Speaker Series: Hoag presents “Natural Sabbath”

Ron Hoag will present “Natural Sabbath: Thoreau’s Mild Sublime” at noon on Monday, March 16, in Bate 2024. A summary follows, and the Faculty Speaker Series committee invites all to join in for light refreshments and scintillating conversation.

Well known to William Cullen Bryant, William Wordsworth, and Henry Thoreau, Edmund Burke’s influential treatise on the Sublime and the Beautiful posits a natural sublime, whose effect on humanity is terror, and a natural beauty, whose effect is pleasure.  For Burke, the sublime and the beautiful are mutually exclusive experiences.  Bryant, Wordsworth, and Thoreau, however, while acknowledging the daunting power of the sublime, also imply a fundamental link between this power and the paradoxically corresponding power in certain experiences of the beautiful in nature.  For these three writers, the wildness in nature is not just sublime but also spiritual, to be reverenced as such if not at the terrifying moment of physical impact then after the fact, upon reflection, when processed as what Wordsworth termed “emotion recollected in tranquility.”  “Reflection alone,” says Thoreau in his college essay on “Sublimity,” “can restore to calmness and equanimity.”