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Welcome to ECCSFN!
Mission

  • Advance the understanding of the nervous system by bringing together scientists of diverse backgrounds, by facilitating the integration of research directed at all levels of biological organization, and by encouraging translational research and the application of new scientific knowledge to improve treatments and cures.
  • Provide professional development activities and educational resources for neuroscientists at all stages of their careers, including undergraduates, graduates, and post doctoral fellows, and increase participation of scientists from a diversity of cultural and ethnic backgrounds.
  • Inform legislators and other policy makers about new scientific knowledge and recent developments in neuroscience research and their implications for public policy, societal benefit, and continued scientific progress.
  • Provide a forum for the exchange of ideas and information between Eastern Carolina-area neuroscientists.
  • Offer educational resources and opportunities for teachers, students and the general public.

Membership in the Eastern Carolina Chapter is open to:

  • Any person holding advanced degree(s) residing in the State of North Carolina that conducts basic research, performs clinical work, performs medical work in neuroscience or its related fields (Regular Membership).
  • Any student enrolled in programs at degree-granting institutions of higher education within North Carolina (Student Membership).
  • Any person interested in the neurosciences but not eligible for regular or student membership as defined in the bylaws of ECCSFN (Affiliate Membership).

ECCSFN also assists its members and invited speakers by applying for: 

  • Travel grants for graduate students and postdoctoral fellows to attend the Society for Neuroscience meeting or other scientific meetings/events. 
  • Travel awards for invited speakers. 
  • SFN Chapter Grants that support and encourage chapter activities. 
  • Foundation and local grants that support chapter activities and host leading neuroscientists.

Brain Injury News -- ScienceDaily

  • Brain guides body much sooner than previously believed
    The brain plays an active role much earlier than previously thought. Long before movement or other behaviors occur, the nascent brain of an embryonic frog instructs normal muscle and nerve patterning and protects the embryo from agents that cause developmental defects. In addition to identifying these essential functions for the first time, researchers successfully rescued defects caused by lack of a brain by using widely available, human-approved drugs.
  • Immune cells may heal bleeding brain after strokes
    By studying rodents, researchers showed that instead of attacking germs, some neutrophils may help heal the brain after an intracerebral hemorrhage, a form of stroke caused by ruptured blood vessels. The study suggests that two neutrophil-related proteins may play critical roles in protecting the brain from stroke-induced damage and could be used as treatments for intracerebral hemorrhage.