engineeringcover
During a STEM Day event for high school students, ECU engineering professor Karen De Urquidi demonstrated the force needed to crush a full soda can. The college where the university's engineering program is housed received approval from the UNC Board of Governors April 11 to change its name to the ECU College of Engineering and Technology. (Photo by Jay Clark)


ENGINEERED SUCCESS
ECU now has College of Engineering and Technology

April 11, 2014

By Crystal Baity and Steve Tuttle
ECU News Services


One of East Carolina University’s fastest-growing colleges has added engineering to its name, reflecting an increasing emphasis on that program.

ECU’s College of Technology and Computer Sciences will become the College of Engineering and Technology. The UNC Board of Governors approved the change Friday, April 11. The request had the unanimous support of other engineering programs in North Carolina’s public university system.

A new master's degree in biomedical engineering within the college also was approved. Biomedical engineering focuses on improving medical systems to enhance human health, including prosthetics and medical devices and instruments. The program includes collaboration with ECU Brody School of Medicine faculty.

The newly named college has close to 2,000 students and includes four departments: engineering, computer science, technology systems and construction management.

“Our new name will provide the college and the university with greater visibility for prospective students and faculty, it will enhance our opportunities to secure external research funding, increase economic development opportunities and more accurately identify the programs in the college,” said David White, dean of the College of Engineering and Technology. “I also believe employers will be more likely to look to ECU and the college for their future employees and leaders.”

ECU established an undergraduate engineering degree program in 2004. It is now the largest degree program in the college with more than 500 students.

ECU engineering students can choose from five possible concentrations — biomedical engineering, bioprocess engineering, electrical engineering, industrial and systems engineering and mechanical engineering.

Enrollment in engineering at ECU has grown from 37 in 2004 to 521 in 2013, according to the department’s web site. About 95 percent of graduates are offered jobs within 90 days of graduation, and about 65 percent of graduates stay in North Carolina – with about half of those working in eastern North Carolina. The university said it plans to grow the program to enroll about 1,000 students in the future.

The mission of ECU's Department of Engineering is to provide a theory-based, application-oriented general engineering education that serves as a basis for career success and lifelong learning. ECU’s B.S. in engineering program is accredited by the Engineering Commission of Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology.