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Med School dean to leave

(Nov. 9, 2000)   —   Dr. James A. Hallock, vice chancellor for health sciences at East Carolina University and dean of the Brody School of Medicine for the last 12 years, will be leaving the university in January to become president of an organization that oversees the credentialing of the graduates of foreign medical schools in the United States.

Hallock, 58, has presided over the medical school and the ECU Schools of Nursing and Allied Health Sciences during a time of profound change in American health care. During that time of transition, the schools have experienced steady growth, development of new programs and financial stability.

Hallock expects to leave ECU in mid-January. The plan for identifying a successor will be announced later, although it is expected that an interim dean will be appointed in anticipation of a national search for a new vice chancellor. ECU Chancellor Richard R. Eakin described Hallock's pending departure as a major loss for the university.

"Dr. Hallock's work has simply been magnificent," said Eakin. "He has guided the Brody School of Medicine through a period of significant improvement in quality as recognized not only within the state of North Carolina but nationally as well. His legacy will be enduring and he will be greatly missed."

Hallock joined the university in 1988 as medical school dean and shortly after assumed responsibility for the entire health sciences division. Under his leadership, the medical school has twice been accredited with commendation by the Liaison Committee on Medical Education, the accreditor of the nation's 125 medical schools.

In addition, the school has achieved national distinction as perhaps the country's best example of a community-based medical school devoted to improving the health of a rural population. Recently, the school has won national recognition for its leadership in the development of methods to assess clinical skills and of new technologies such as telemedicine and robotic surgery.

"I've had the opportunity to lead a very talented and dedicated group of faculty and staff members who have made an enormous impact on the lives of students, patients and the basic level of health services in eastern North Carolina," Hallock said. "I'm extremely grateful for that opportunity, and I have received a great deal of satisfaction from the relationships I have with so many people within and outside the university. I believe the division is well-positioned to continue its success."

Hallock will assume the presidency of the Education Commission for Foreign Medical Graduates, based in Philadelphia. The group's primary responsibility is to oversee the certification of credentials for the approximately 6,000 foreign medical graduates who enter the country each year for training.

Two years ago, Hallock was named chairman of the Council of Deans of the Association of American Medical Colleges. He has served the AAMC in a leadership role for the last nine years. He is also on the board of the Liaison Committee for Medical Education. And he served as chairman of the national Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education. Hallock and his wife, Jeanne, have three grown children, all married, and nine grandchildren.

 


Contact: ECU News Bureau | 252-328-6481

 
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