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Speaker Biographies      PDF version

Jamie Kruse
Jamie Kruse

Welcoming Remarks
Research Conference, Friday, 8:30 am

Dr. Jamie Kruse is the director of the Center for Natural Hazards Research (CNHR) and the former director of the Renaissance Computing Institute at East Carolina University (RENCI at ECU).

Her fields of interest include experimental economics, applied microeconomics, industrial organization, risk and mitigation, health economics, and wind hazard economics. Among her many professional activities, she has been a fellow of the FDIC Center for Financial Research, served on several panels for the National Science Foundation, and been a visiting professor at the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology in Zurich.

Dr. Kruse holds a PhD in economics from the University of Arizona, and an MS in agricultural economics from Colorado State University.

Tom Allen
Tom Allen

Emerging Technology for Hazards Risk Reduction
Public Forum, Thursday, 4:10 pm

Dr. Tom Allen is a geographer with research and teaching specialization in geographic information science (GIS). His research emphasizes the integration of geospatial technologies toward environmental problems and natural resource management, including GIS, remote sensing, spatial analysis, environmental modeling, and visualization. He has applied these technologies to understand environmental problems primarily in climate change and biogeography, environmental health and mosquito-borne disease, landscape changes following biological invasions, and coastal processes and natural hazards.

His first forays into research were as an undergraduate, where he developed a surf forecasting algorithm. While GIS was maturing as a technology in the late 1980s, he conducted a research project as a study abroad student in the Fiji Islands, mapping ethnobotanical resources in mangroves in a rural village.

Besides his trying to surf before and after hurricanes, Dr. Allen has worked continually on coastal hazard projects over his academic career. His first funded grant was to study the effectiveness of GIS-use in disaster response following Hurricane Fran in 1996. When Hurricane Dennis-Floyd struck, Dr. Allen was living in Portsmouth, Virginia. The City of Portsmouth lost its water supply when a reservoir dam overtopped a levee and flooded the main pump station supplying water to the city of 100,000. Portsmouth suffered concern and grief without water for several days to a week, until wells and backup systems could be activated.

Dr. Allen is currently an associate professor of geography at East Carolina University (ECU) and the director of the Renaissance Computing Institute at ECU (RENCI at ECU). He has earned a BS in geography (1991) from Old Dominion University and a PhD in geography from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (1995). He is motivated by the potential to integrate understanding of environmental processes, geospatial technology, and the holistic perspective of geography toward a sustainable coastal environment.

Jay Barnes
Jay Barnes

Faces from the Flood
Public Forum, Thursday, 5:10 pm

Jay Barnes is director of the North Carolina Aquarium at Pine Knoll Shores. He has worked with the aquarium since 1980 and has been director since 1989. A graduate of NC State University’s College of Design, he also holds a master’s degree in advertising from Syracuse University.

He is the author of two books, North Carolina’s Hurricane History and Florida’s Hurricane History, and co-author of Faces from the Flood (UNC Press). His newest book, Hurricane Hazel in the Carolinas, will be released in spring 2010. As a hurricane historian, he lectures widely on US hurricanes and has appeared in various productions for the Discovery Channel, The Weather Channel, The History Channel, National Public Radio, and others. He lives in Pine Knoll Shores, North Carolina.

Philip Berke
Photo not available.

Emergency Preparedness Demonstration: Increasing Disaster Awareness and Preparedness in Disadvantaged Communities (panel member)
Public Forum, Thursday, 1:00 pm

Dr. Philip R. Berke is a professor of land use and environmental planning in the Department of City and Regional Planning at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (UNC). He is the deputy director of the Institute for the Environment and director of the Center for Sustainable Community Design of the Institute for the Environment. Dr. Berke is also adjunct professor in the Curriculum of Ecology at UNC. He received his PhD in urban and regional science from Texas A&M University.

His scholarly activities focus on developing a deeper understanding of the dynamic relationships among urban settlements, natural systems, and needs and aspirations of increasingly diverse human populations. He has always benefited most from taking an interdisciplinary perspective in deriving practice-based solutions to complex urban environmental problems that help communities recognize and live within the limits of natural systems.

His current research focuses capacity-building planning to enhance resiliency of marginalized populations, integration of green community design concepts into comprehensive urban plans, and comparative evaluation of the impacts of compact and low-density sprawl development patterns on watersheds and floodplain environments. This current work is supported by the National Science Foundation, the Department of Homeland Security, and the Federal Emergency Management Agency.

Dr. Burke recently served as guest editor for a 2008 special issue on green communities of the Journal of the American Planning Association. He has authored or co-authored 70 scholarly publications and eight books on land use and environmental planning, and he is the lead co-author of the fifth edition of Urban Land Use (University of Illinois Press 2006). He is a senior research associate of the New Zealand International Global Change Institute. He serves on numerous scientific and environmental organizations, including

  • Scientific Advisory Council of the French Association of Disaster Prevention;
  • Steering Committee on Resiliency and Vulnerability Observatory Network, supported by the National Science Foundation;
  • Conservation Thresholds Advisory Committee of the Environmental Law Institute;
  • Land Use and Growth in the West Research and Policy Roundtable of the Sonoran Institute of Arizona.

In 1992, Dr. Berke was a Senior Fulbright Scholar at the Centre for Environmental and Resource Studies, University of Waikato, New Zealand.

From 2003 to 2005, Dr. Berke was a member of the National Research Council’s Committee on Disaster Research in the Social Sciences. He served with a team of experts that evaluated the state of knowledge in hazards research and the effectiveness of major national policies aimed at supporting societal resiliency to natural hazards. The committee also recommended ways to strengthen the nation’s disaster and hazard mitigation management system.

Okmyung Bin
Okmyung Bin

Property Values and Flood Risk: What Happens to Risk Premiums over Time?
Research Conference, Friday, 1:50 pm

Dr. Okmyung Bin is an associate faculty member with the Center for Natural Hazards Research (CNHR) at East Carolina University and serves on the advisory committee for the PhD Program in Coastal Resources Management. In the summer of 2007, he was a visiting professor at the China Agricultural University in Beijing. His research interests include environmental and natural resource economics, coastal resources management, real estate economics, applied microeconomics, and applied econometrics.

Dr. Bin holds a PhD from Oregon State University, a MA from Korea University, and a BA from Hankuk University of Foreign Studies.

John Cole
John Cole

Emerging Technology for Hazards Risk Reduction
(panel member)
Public Forum, Thursday, 4:10 pm

John Cole has a degree in meteorology from Florida State University and has completed graduate work in atmospheric science at Texas Tech university. He has worked with NOAA's National Weather Service for the past 23 years gaining tropical operational experience at several coastal offices, including Port Arthur, TX; Miami, FL; Corpus Christi, TX; Charleston, SC; and Newport/Morehead City, NC. Cole has served in forecaster and warning coordination meteorologist (WCM) positions.

Cole has been the WCM at the Newport/Morehead City office since February 2003. He was a senior forecaster at WFO Charleston, SC, in 1999 when Hurricane Floyd gave them a glancing blow. Previous tracks moved Floyd over this location as a major hurricane. Their staff was worried about the extensive damage this would cause. The largest mass evacuation in history made a big impact on Cole’s family. His wife spent nine hours on the road evacuating their three children to a safer location in Columbia, SC. She was one of the lucky ones who evacuated early! Many gave up on the clogged Interstates and highways and returned home.

John Cooper
John Cooper

Emergency Preparedness Demonstration: Increasing Disaster Awareness and Preparedness in Disadvantaged Communities
Public Forum, Thursday, 1:00 pm

Dr. John Cooper is a program director and research associate at MDC, Inc., where he directs a $2.5 million FEMA-supported effort to understand barriers to increased emergency awareness and preparedness in marginalized communities. Following Hurricane Floyd, he was a planning specialist and mitigation program liaison to the Princeville redevelopment planning team.

John Dorman
Photo not available.

Emerging Technology for Hazards Risk Reduction
(panel member)
Public Forum, Thursday, 4:10 pm

John Dorman is the chief of Geospatial and Technology Management Section, NC Division of Emergency Management, NC Department of Crime Control and Prevention.

Brian Etherton
Photo not available.

Emerging Technology for Hazards Risk Reduction
(panel member)
Public Forum, Thursday, 4:10 pm

Career information

  • May 2009 to present: Renaissance Computing Institute (RENCI) senior scientist, meteorology modeling
  • Aug 2003 to May 2009: Assistant professor, University of North Carolina at Charlotte, developed the meteorology program
  • Aug 2001 to July 2003: Post-doctoral research associate and lecturer, University of Miami
  • Aug 1996 to Aug 2001: Graduate student at Penn State University, earned a PhD in meteorology in 2002

Past hurricane research: During his time in Miami, Dr. Brian Etherton worked with NOAA Hurricane Research Division personnel on forecast model initialization.

Current hurricane research: Using RENCI computing resources, Dr. Etherton is partnering with NC State faculty to develop a "real-time" forecast system for hurricanes.

Floyd and me: Dr. Etherton was at Penn State in 1999, as a graduate student. He didn’t really notice Floyd all that much...

Questions: The National Hurricane Center and the National Weather Service provide the information that they provide: the track/cone, the expected strongest winds, etc. I want to know: what do people really want to know?

Charles Fisher
Charles Fisher

Human Dimensions of Hurricane Floyd
(panel member)
Public Forum, Thursday, 2:00 pm

Charlie Fisher is vice president for James Lee Witt Associates, the leading disaster preparedness and response firm founded by the former FEMA director. When faced with disasters, governors, mayors, CEOs, and university presidents have turned to James Lee Witt Associates to help them respond and recover from the event. Mr. Fisher oversees the firm’s Federal Practice as well as the Mid-Atlantic and Midwest regions. Witt Associates has been on the ground working in Louisiana since Katrina, in the Midwest since the floods last summer, and in Texas since Ike struck Galveston and Houston last fall.

Mr. Fisher also oversees teams of emergency management and subject-matter experts working to assess the preparedness of public, not-for-profit, and private sector organizations. These teams work with officials at all levels of the organization to identify and analyze gaps in preparedness for natural disasters and acts of terrorism and help the organizations implement recommendations to address those gaps and enhance preparedness.

Prior to joining James Lee Witt Associates, Mr. Fisher was a consultant for the electricity, natural gas, telecommunication, and transportation industries. He led the Illinois Commerce Commission, which regulates public utilities and the transportation industry. While there, he oversaw the implementation of several emergency preparedness and safety programs, including utility restoration protocols, enhanced emergency telephone locator systems, natural gas pipeline safety, and freight and transit safety initiatives.

Mr. Fisher has testified before government bodies at the local state and Congressional levels, addressed organizations in North America and Europe, and has worked with utility and critical infrastructure experts from five continents. He was also the keynote speaker for the Emergency Management Conference in Melbourne Australia.

Laura Furgione
Laura Fugione

Charting the Course
Research Conference, Friday, 12:10 pm

Since August 31, 2008, Laura Furgione has served as the assistant administrator for the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's (NOAA) Office of Program Planning and Integration. In this role, she is responsible for corporate management to coordinate the many lines of service of this $4 billion agency dedicated to understanding and predicting changes in the Earth's environment and conserving and managing coastal and marine resources. She is responsible for annual planning as well as long term strategic planning, performance evaluation, program integration through matrix management, and policy integration including compliance with the National Environmental Policy Act. Her efforts are directed to ensuring NOAA's investments and actions are guided by a strategic plan; are based on sound social and economic analysis; adhere to executive and legislative science, technology, and environmental policy; and integrate the full breadth of NOAA's resources, knowledge, and talent to meet its stated mission goal.

From October 2004 to August 2008, Ms. Furgione served as director of NOAA's National Weather Service, Alaska Region. Alaska Region is headquartered in Anchorage with responsibility for 20 offices throughout the state. As director, Ms. Furgione was responsible for all operational and scientific climatological, meteorological, hydrological, volcanic ash, and tsunami warning programs for the state of Alaska and its surrounding waters.

Other positions Ms. Furgione has held within the NWS include meteorological intern at the Kodiak, Alaska, Weather Service Office; intern at the Fairbanks, Alaska, Weather Forecast Office (WFO); aviation meteorologist at the Alaska Aviation Weather Unit; warning coordination meteorologist at WFO Morehead City, North Carolina; meteorologist in charge of WFO Juneau, Alaska; and Alaska Deputy Regional Director.

Ms. Furgione holds a bachelor's degree in atmospheric science from the University of Missouri-Columbia and a master's degree in public administration from the University of Alaska-Southeast. She and her husband, Tim, became the proud parents of twins in October 2004.

Governor Jim Hunt
Governor Jim Hunt

Keynote Speaker
Public Forum, Thursday, 3:15 pm

Jim Hunt is a former four-term Democratic governor of North Carolina (1977–1985 and 1993–2001). A graduate of NC State University, Governor Hunt holds a BS in agricultural education and a MS in agricultural economics.

Sarah Jamison
Sarah Jamison

Emerging Technology for Hazards Risk Reduction
(panel member)
Public Forum, Thursday, 4:10 pm

Sarah Jamison graduated from the Florida Institute of Technology (FIT) in 2002, and was there during Floyd as a sophomore. At one point, Floyd was forecasted to track over FIT as a Category 4 hurricane. The entire school was evacuated for the first time. Evacuation traffic clogged the interstates for so long that school was cancelled for four days after the storm, though the area saw minimal impacts.

After graduation, Jamison briefly worked at the National Weather Service office in Gray, ME, then at the Kansas City, MO, office before moving to Morehead City in 2003. Jamison is the hydrologic focal point and general forecaster at the office, responsible for maintaining and updating the flooding program applications. She developed the NWS Hurricane Floyd 10-year Anniversary Hurricane and Flooding Awareness Campaign, which includes impacted offices as far north as New York.

Donna Kain
Donna Kain

Severe-Weather-Related Risk and Emergency Communication in Coastal Communities
Research Conference, Friday, 3:00 pm

Dr. Donna Kain is director of outreach for Renaissance Computing Institute at East Carolina University (RENCI at ECU), as well as a faculty affiliate of ECU's Center for Natural Hazards Research (CNHR).

She joined the ECU faculty in the fall of 2004 after two years as an assistant professor in the Technical Communications Department at Clarkson University in Potsdam, New York. She has taught courses in rhetoric, technical communication, writing for business and industry, digital video production, and Web design. Her research has included the rhetoric and instrumental discourse of the Americans with Disabilities Act and related public policies, information technology applications for the classroom, and the uses of genres in professional settings. Most recently, as a recipient of a North Carolina Sea Grant, she has been studying coastal residents' perception and use of hazard information.

Craig Landry
Craig Landry

Flood Insurance Coverage in Dare County: Before and After Floyd
Research Conference, Friday, 1:30 pm

Property Values and Flood Risk: What Happens to Risk Premiums over Time?
Research Conference, Friday, 1:50 pm

A natural resource and environmental economist, Dr. Craig Landry has expertise in coastal resource management, recreation demand, non-market valuation, and experimental economics. He has ten years' experience in coastal research, including analysis of coastal hazards (beach erosion, flooding, hurricane risk); household demand for beach recreation, boating, and angling; housing markets in the coastal zone; and water quality issues. Although his primary focus is quantitative analysis and application of rational choice models, he also has expertise in behavioral economics and social-psychological aspects of coastal recreation and tourism.

Specific research projects include household flood insurance coverage in the coastal zone, optimal management of beach erosion, coastal housing market response to risks and amenities, valuation of beach recreation and the role of beach congestion in site selection, economic impacts and economic value of North Carolina's for-hire recreational fishing fleet, and valuation of maritime heritage.

He has served as an expert panelist for the General Accounting Office and the National Academies of Science on coastal vulnerability to climate change, and for the Louisiana State University Center for Natural Resource Economics & Policy on rebuilding in coastal Louisiana post-Hurricanes Katrina and Rita.

Noel Lee
Noel Lee

Emerging Technology for Hazards Risk Reduction
(panel member)
Public Forum, Thursday, 4:10 pm

Mr. Noel Lee is the director of Pitt County Department of Emergency Management, supervising the operations and services of four divisions: Emergency Planning, Fire Marshall, Emergency Medical Services, and 911 Communications.

Deirdre Mageean
Deirdre Mageean

Dr. Deirdre M. Mageean is vice chancellor for Research and Graduate Studies at East Carolina University, a position she assumed in July 2005. She is responsible for overseeing all issues related to research, graduate education, economic development, and federal relations.

Prior to this, she was associate vice president for research and dean of the Graduate School at the University of Maine from 2002–2005. While at Maine, she served on the Executive Committee of the Northeastern Association of Graduate Schools and was a member of the New England Board of Higher Education’s Blue Ribbon Task Force on the Participation of Under-represented Minorities in Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics.

From 1989-2002, she was director of the Margaret Chase Smith Center for Public Policy at the University of Maine and taught in the departments of Resource Economics and Policy and Public Administration.

Since coming to North Carolina in 2005, Dr. Mageean has chaired and served on committees focused on research, graduate education, compliance issues, and economic development, including the North Carolina Biotechnology Council; the North Carolina Agromedicine Institute; and the North Carolina Association for Biomedical Research. She has also served on community boards, including the Pitt County Development Commission and the North Carolina Rural Center.

Dr. Mageean has served on the Board of Directors of the Council of Graduate Schools (CGS) and the Nominating Committee of CGS for 2008 and 2009; is a member of the Governmental Affairs Committee of CGS; and is a member of the Executive Committee of the Council of Research Policy and Graduate Education (CRPGE) of the Association of Public and Land-grant Universities (A-P-L-U) (formerly NASULGC).

Dr. Mageean holds a BS sociology from Queens University of Belfast, an MA in sociology from the University of York, and a PhD in geography from the Open University, England. She was an American Council of Learned Societies Fellow during 1984–1985. Her research, which has been funded by the NSF, EPA, NOAA, and EDA, has focused on historical patterns of migration, population-environment interactions, and the policy implications of demographic change. She has considerable experience working with both state and federal representatives on research, graduate training, and development issues.

Richard Moore
Richard Moore

Dinner Speaker
Public Forum, Thursday, 7:00 pm

Richard H. Moore is a native of Granville County, North Carolina.

Moore began his public career in 1989, as a federal prosecutor in the Eastern District of North Carolina. Among his successful prosecutions as a US Attorney were several complex financial conspiracies, including one of the largest check kiting schemes in US history.

In 1992, Moore was elected to the NC House of Representatives, where he sponsored bills to reform government, expand child care tax credits, help small businesses provide healthcare coverage and increase unemployment benefits.

Governor Jim Hunt appointed Moore as Secretary of the Department of Crime Control and Public Safety in 1995, where he led the state’s emergency response to Hurricanes Fran and Floyd. As the state’s chief law enforcement official, Moore oversaw the state Highway Patrol and National Guard. Moore co-authored Faces from the Flood: Hurricane Floyd Remembered, a book later developed into an Emmy-nominated documentary that aired on UNC-TV.

Moore recently completed two terms as State Treasurer of North Carolina. He was the sole fiduciary, serving as the state’s banker and chief investment officer and administering all of the state’s public pension plans. The pension fund was rated either the first- or second-best funded public system in the country over the last five years. Moore was also responsible for issuing billions of dollars in public debt while maintaining the state’s AAA rating status.

Moore has been a leader in the national movement to protect shareholder rights against Wall Street corporate abuses and authored investment and mutual fund protection principles that have been adopted by pension fund managers across the country. As a result of his efforts to promote corporate responsibility, Moore served two terms as the only elected official on the executive board of the New York Stock Exchange (NYSE) and now serves on the NYSE Regulation Board. In 2004, Moore was honored as a Top Public Official of the Year by Governing Magazine for his national leadership on corporate accountability and guidance of the state’s pension fund.

For his expertise on corporate governance issues as well as investment management, Moore has been profiled in US News and World Report and is regularly quoted in The New York Times and the Wall Street Journal. He has co-hosted CNBC’s popular morning show, Squawk Box, numerous times and has appeared on the evening news programs of all the major networks.

Moore is an honors graduate of Wake Forest University and the School of Law with a graduate degree in accounting and finance from the London School of Economics. He and his wife, Noel, and their three children have a home in Raleigh and a farm near Kittrell, North Carolina. Moore is a member of St. Stephen's Episcopal Church in Oxford, where he teaches Sunday school.

Catherine Smith
Catherine Smith

Severe-Weather-Related Risk and Emergency Communication in Coastal Communities
Research Conference, Friday, 3:00 pm

Dr. Catherine F. Smith is a professor of English/Technical and Professional Communication at East Carolina University, and an adjunct professor of public policy at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. She is author of Writing Public Policy: A Practical Guide to Communicating in the Policy Making Process, 2d edition (Oxford University Press, 2009).

Her current research focuses on public safety communication, specifically extreme weather risk and emergency communication. She is principal investigator (with co-investigators Donna J. Kain and Kenneth Wilson) of a study of hurricane communication in eastern North Carolina funded by NOAA’s North Carolina Sea Grant.

Gavin Smith
Gavin Smith

Introduction of Keynote Speaker, Jim Hunt
Public Forum, Thursday, 3:00 pm

Dr. Gavin Smith is the executive director of the Center for the Study of Natural Hazards and Disasters (UNC Hazards Center). In this role, Dr. Smith oversees the administration of the UNC Hazards Center, including the identification of research opportunities, building partnerships among hazard scholars and practitioners, and managing additional research initiatives and sub-centers as they emerge. The UNC Hazards Center research areas include modeling, land use planning, technology applications, social implications of hazards and disasters, environmental hazards management, law and policy, public health, business, and economics.

Dr. Smith is also the executive director of the Department of Homeland Security’s Center of Excellence – Disasters, Coastal Infrastructure, and Emergency Management (DIEM). The Center of Excellence research areas include hazard modeling, engineering, human behavior, and land use planning. Dr. Smith is currently engaged in planning-related research within the center, focused on a national evaluation of local and state hazard mitigation plans.

Dr. Smith is an associate research professor in the Department of City and Regional Planning at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (UNC) and teaches courses in disaster recovery, hazard mitigation, and special topics. Dr. Smith is currently writing A Review of the United States Disaster Assistance Framework: Planning for Recovery (Public Entity Risk Institute) and recently completed book chapters addressing the linkage between hazards analysis, planning, and sustainable development.

Prior to accepting the position of executive director at UNC, Dr. Smith served as a principal in the firm PBS&J. As one of ten individuals designated a principal within the 4,000-person firm, Dr. Smith’s specific duties included the provision of high level policy counsel to governors, federal agencies, corporations, universities, and nations regarding disaster recovery and hazard mitigation practice.

Following Hurricane Katrina, Dr. Smith worked in the Mississippi Office of the Governor, serving as the director of the Office of Recovery and Renewal. In this role, he and his staff focused on four primary tasks:

  • The identification of federal, corporate, non-profit, and foundation financial assistance
  • The provision of education, outreach, and training to local governments and state agencies
  • Providing counsel to the governor, his staff, and state agency officials regarding disaster recovery policy issues
  • The implementation of the Governor’s Commission Report, "After Katrina: Building Back Better than Ever."

In this role Dr. Smith testified before Congress twice, providing recommended policy changes to improve the delivery of post-disaster recovery and reconstruction activities. He also developed the concept and wrote policy guidance associated with the $400 million Alternative Housing Pilot Program, an initiative intended to test the construction and deployment of improved emergency housing alternatives following Hurricane Katrina.

Dr. Smith served as the senior program manager of the Planning and Grants Management group within the Risk and Emergency Management Division at PBS&J prior to his promotion to principal. Responsibilities included overseeing the development of state, local, and university hazard mitigation and disaster recovery plans across the country, and providing pre- and post-disaster grants management and policy consultation services to local, state, and national governments.

Prior to his employment with PBS&J, he was the vice president of Professional Services at Durham Technologies, Inc. In this capacity, Dr. Smith assisted state and local governments with hazard mitigation and recovery planning, hazard identification, risk assessment, natural hazards loss estimation methodologies, gathering and analyzing data to aid in decision making and policy formulation, grants management technical assistance, and training.

Dr. Smith was employed with the North Carolina Division of Emergency Management from 1996 to 2002. Dr. Smith held positions including National Flood Insurance Program planner, mitigation grants management coordinator and state hazard mitigation officer. During the last three years at the division, Dr. Smith served as the assistant director for hazard mitigation. In this capacity, Dr. Smith was responsible for the management of five branches:

  • Grants Management
  • Risk Assessment and Training
  • Hazard Mitigation Planning
  • Floodplain Management
  • Real Estate/Legal Team

Specific programs within the preceding branches included these programs and initiatives:

  • Hazard Mitigation Grant Program
  • Flood Mitigation Assistance Program
  • North Carolina Hazard Mitigation Planning Initiative
  • National Flood Insurance Program
  • North Carolina Floodplain Mapping Initiative
  • Earthquake Program

During his tenure with the division, the mitigation section administered mitigation and disaster recovery grant funds in excess of $800 million associated with ten presidential disaster declarations. Following Hurricane Floyd, Dr. Smith served as an advisor to Governor Hunt on policies and programs associated with long-term recovery in North Carolina.

Prior to working at the Division of Emergency Management, Dr. Smith was a research associate at the Hazard Reduction and Recovery Center at Texas A&M University. Work centered on several research projects, including a nationwide review of search and rescue activities, and a national analysis of the level of coordination between local emergency managers and land-use planners. During his four years at the Hazard Reduction and Recovery Center, Dr. Smith completed his PhD in urban and regional planning, specializing in environmental planning and policy, environmental dispute resolution, and hazard mitigation. Dr. Smith also received BS and MS degrees in sociology from Texas A&M University. Areas of emphasis included urban sociology, the politics of urban development, and demography.

Jimmy Tickel
Jimmy Tickel

Human Dimensions of Hurricane Floyd
(panel member)
Public Forum, Thursday, 2:00 pm

Dr. Jimmy Tickel is a veterinary specialist with the North Carolina Department of Agriculture & Consumer Services (NCDA&CS), the veterinary liaison for PHRST 4, and an adjunct professor at North Carolina State University College of Veterinary Medicine. He has served at the NCDA&CS for 19 years since working in a mixed animal private practice for four years earlier in his career.

Dr. Tickel works on the national, state, and local level in disaster and disease preparedness, planning, training, and response. Dr. Tickel has spoken in 29 states on topics ranging from business continuity in disease outbreaks to developing state and local disaster response teams. One of his favorite projects has been the co-development of the responder credentialing curriculum at the veterinary school.


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