ECU Logo
 
College of Fine Arts and Communication
School of Art and Design


Foundations Courses

Course descriptions are intended as guides, to inform students of the essential content of the four studio foundation courses. They are Drawing (Art 1020), Design I (Art1005), Figure Drawing (Art 1030), and Design II (Art1015). Since beginning students are dealing with the most basic form-generating processes, much of the information will overlap from course to course.

 

In these courses, students are taught to control and organize the elements of design (point, line, plane, shape, texture, color, space, value) using the principles of organization (harmony, variety, balance, proportion, movement, repetition, rhythm, dominance). This is achieved by the use of a variety of media in both two and three dimensional projects. Usually an exercise has a limited and specific aim focusing on certain elements and how they may be effectively used with the principles of organization.

 

It is recognized that there are many ways of presenting information to students. We welcome this variety and encourage students to attempt courses from different teachers. The content provided is to be used by the instructor who may add material as she/he feels appropriate.

 

ART 1005 - Design I

This course will introduce methods of form generation using the elements of design and the principles of organization. These will be investigated through a series of two and three dimensional exercises.

It is expected that the following specific information would be included in this course:

  1. The introduction of the Foundations Glossary
  2. Examples of artworks which exemplify the specific types of problems being undertaken.
  3. Exercises, within each of which, are introduced limited but specific elements of design and principles of organization.
  4. Exercises which introduce the broad drawing concepts: orthographic and isometric projection and one, two and three point perspective.
  5. Introduction of Relief Sculpture
  6. Introduction to the twelve step color wheel, and the Munsell and Ostwald color systems.
  7. Complete a twelve step color wheel, a nine step grey value scale, a nine-step monochromatic value scale and a multi-step intensity scale.
  8. Exercises which introduce the following color information:
    a) Monochromatic color
    b) Analogous color
    c) Simultaneous contrast
    d) Warm and cool color
    e) Complementary and split complementary color
    f) Triadic color schemes
  9. Introduction of the color theories of Itten, Albers and others.
The above information may be presented in a variety of ways which include both two and three dimensional media. One project may deal with a number of particulars listed. For instance a single exercise may cover both specific elements as listed in #3 and also include one or more of the items listed in #9. An important goal is to develop the student's ability to evaluate visual works, and determine the success with which they have solved problems set, and to clearly communicate their views to others. Strongly encouraged is the use of the Foundations vocabulary list.

 

ART 1015 - Design II

This course is essentially a continuation of Design I where students learn methods of form generation using the elements of design and the principles of organization (as listed on page 13). These are investigated through a series of exercises, both two and three dimensional, with greater emphasis on three dimensional structures than in Design I.

It is expected that the following specific information would be included in this course:

  1. Review of the Foundations Glossary introduced in Design I.
  2. Examples of artworks which exemplify the specific types of problems being undertaken.
  3. Exercises, within each of which, are introduced limited but specific elements of design and principles of organization.
  4. Exercises demonstrating modeling / shading.
  5. Exercises which continue the investigation of paraline drawing, perspective and cast shadow.
  6. Exercises which are primarily concerned with color as an element of two and three-dimensional design and which demonstrate the following:
    a) How color pigments are affected by light
    b) How color may be used to evoke an emotional response.
  7. Required reading about color
The above information may be presented in a variety of ways which include both two and three dimensional media. One project may deal with a number of particulars listed. For instance a single exercise may cover both specific elements and principles as listed in #3 and also include one or more of the items listed in #7.

 

An important goal is to continue develop the student's ability to evaluate visual works, and determine the success with which s/he has solved problems set, and to clearly communicate their views to others. Strongly encouraged is the use of the Foundations vocabulary list.

 

ART 1020 - Drawing


This course will introduce methods of drawing from observation. Emphasis will be on object drawing and on methods of creating the illusion of space. Composition and organization of the elements of design will be a concern at all times.

It is expected that the following specific information would be included in this course:

  1. The introduction of vocabulary. (Foundations Glossary)
  2. Examples of drawings which exemplify the specific types of problems being undertaken. Discussion of the basic elements and principles of organization as they apply to drawing cannot be too strongly emphasized at this time, when many students are in Design I.
  3. Exercises which are primarily concerned with the following:
    a) Linear Perspective (one, two and three point).
    b) Structural Drawing (understanding of structural organization, proportion, and line quality relative to natural and man-made objects should be developed).
    c) The illusion of shallow, moderate and deep space.
    d) Value (highlight / cast shadow and arbitrary value, also high key, low key and full value).
    e) Contour Drawing (blind contour and cross contour).
    f) Gesture Drawing.
It is assumed that, at the discretion of the instructor, more than the above may be of concern. This might include the introduction of a variety of media and techniques, visits to studios and galleries and any information that would be beneficial and informative.

 

ART 1030 - Figure Drawing

This course will continue the process begun in beginning drawing, of building a solid foundation in basic drawing skills through observation. The student will aim to develop a sensitivity to the structure, anatomy and expressive qualities of the human form in a variety of ways including; line, plane, value, mass and shape. Composition will be a consideration at all times.

It is expected that the following specific information will be included in this course:

  1. Review vocabulary from beginning drawing and introduce that which is specific to figure drawing.
  2. Examples of drawings which exemplify the specific types of problems being undertaken. The importance of the basic elements and principles of design as they apply to drawing cannot be too strongly emphasized at this time when most of the class are in Design II.
  3. Exercises which are primarily concerned with the following:
    a) Measurement and proportion related to the figure
    b) Gesture (quick and sustained)
    c) Contour (blind & cross)
    d) Basic skeletal and muscular anatomy
    e) Figure in environment
It is assumed that, at the discretion of the instructor, more than the above may be of concern. This might include the introduction of a variety of media and techniques, visits to studios and galleries and any information that would be beneficial and informative.

 

Art History

The following art history courses, which should be taken in sequence, complement the Foundation studio courses: The Dimensions of Art (Art 1905), Art History Survey (Art 1906), and Art History Survey (Art 1907). These courses deal with the study of prominent artworks and artists in the history of art throughout the world during certain time periods.

 

Art History courses examine artworks through elements of style and principles of organization. The courses also explore the social, political, religious and economic conditions of the culture that influence the production of art. They attempt to enhance students' awareness of humanity.


Art 1905 - The Dimensions of Art

This course serves as an introduction to the various ways of perceiving, discussing and analyzing works of art. The student will aim to increase a sensitivity, appreciation and awareness of critical aspects of art objects and their function in the world.

It is expected that the following information would be included in this course:

  1. Functions of Art
  2. Styles of Art
  3. Structure of Art (visual elements and principles of organization)
  4. Aesthetics
  5. Media (painting, sculpture, architecture, photography and film)
  6. Art Criticism
It is assumed that, at the discretion of the instructor, different topics may be covered in more or less depth than others.


Art 1906 - Art History Survey

This course is a survey of the history of art from the Old Stone Age through the Gothic periods. Although it continues the approach to analyzing artworks used in Art 1905, it differs in its chronological approach to highlighting cultural periods. Topics for this course include both Western and non-Western art.

It is expected that much or all of the following information would be included in this course:

  1. Stone Age Art
  2. African Art
  3. Egyptian Art
  4. Ancient Near Eastern Art
  5. Aegean Art
  6. Greek Art
  7. Etruscan and Roman Art
  8. Early Christian Art
  9. Early Medieval Art
  10. Romanesque Art
  11. Gothic Art
It is assumed that, at the discretion of the instructor, the number and types of topics presented may vary; for example, African Art may be substituted with another non-Western art tradition.


Art 1907 - Art History Survey

This course is a survey of the history of art from the Renaissance to modern times. Although it continues the approach to analyzing artworks used in Art 1905 and 1906, it differs in its chronological approach to highlighting cultural periods

It is expected that much or all of the following information would be included in this course:

  1. Proto-Renaissance Art
  2. Renaissance Art
  3. Baroque Art
  4. 18th Century Art
  5. 19th Century Art
  6. 20th Century Art
  7. Contemporary Art
It is assumed that, at the discretion of the instructor, the number and types of topics presented may vary.