MENU

Academics - Courses

Tell a friend about this page.
All fields required.
Can be sent to only one email address at a time.
Share Facebook Icon Twitter Icon
Honors College Courses

Spring 2016 Honors Seminars

Fact into Fiction: The 1898 Wilmington Coup D’Etat in History and Literature

Faculty: Drs. Karen Zipf and Margaret Bauer (Department of English)
Course Information: HNRS 2011 002 HU 33061
Schedule: 9:30am-10:45am Tuesdays and Thursdays 

Seminar Description: Did you know that the only successful coup d’etat in US history occurred right here in North Carolina in 1898? East Carolina University would be founded just years after this notable event. In this course, students can expect to bolster their critical thinking and analytical skills while exploring the chain of events in the journalistic coverage of the day, in both North Carolina and beyond. Beyond journalism, the course will also explore accounts of the events in historical and creative writing. Students in this seminar will come to appreciate the richness and complexity of North Carolina history while becoming stronger readers and writers. Important Note: This class will offer Humanities credit and count towards satisfying the Writing Intensive requirement. 

Breaking the Boundaries of Race in America: Developing Race Relations Solutions for East Carolina University

Faculty: Dr. Eric Bailey (Department of Anthropology, Public Health)
Course Information: HNRS 2013.001, CRN: 32851, FC:SO, WI
Schedule: 2:00pm-4:50pm Wednesdays 

Seminar Description: The United States continues to face significant race relation problems today, and while identifying problems is relatively easy, proposing and executing solutions requires determination and critical thinking. Students in this course will examine, discuss, and debate the major concepts and frameworks associated with race relations in America. In doing so, they will not only gather background information on this issue through traditional research but also gather insight from university leaders, listening to key administrators at ECU and other North Carolina universities. After students gather this data, they will present their own race relations solutions to the Chancellor’s Office at East Carolina University. Students will jumpstart their leadership and community involvement, learning to identify problems and propose viable solutions. Important Note: This class will offer Social Sciences credit and count towards satisfying the Writing Intensive requirement.  

Public Relations and Leadership: Writing Science for/with the Public

Faculty: Dr. Erin Frost (Department of English)
Course Information: HNRS 2011.006, CRN: 33136, FC:HU, WI
Schedule: 2:00pm-4:50pm Wednesdays 

Seminar Description: This course focuses on the development of transformative leadership abilities in pursuit of civic science. It examines the obligations of citizen-scholars in relationship to the public’s understandings of science and scientific inquiry and gives students practice in communicating about the sciences to a variety of audiences. Students in this course will learn to harness transformational leadership abilities while focusing on civic science. Important Note: This class will offer Humanities credit and count towards satisfying the Writing Intensive requirement.  

Time Travel: Philosophy and Physics

Faculty: Dr. Henry Jacoby (Department of Philosophy) and Dr. John Kenney (Department of Physics)
Course Information: HNRS 2011.007, Humanities Credit, WI, CRN: 33143 –or – HNRS 2014.001, Science Credit, WI, CRN: 33139
Schedule: 2:00pm-3:15pm Mondays, Wednesdays 

Seminar Description: What is found at the crossroads of philosophy and physics? This course addresses this question directly. Through class discussion and exploration, students will come to appreciate the nature of science, matter, and time from physical and philosophical perspectives. Such an approach is unique but rewarding and insightful. Important Note: This class will offer Humanities or Science credit and count towards satisfying the Writing Intensive requirement. Instructors are team-teaching the course, so both sections are the same course. 

Experiencing Illness: Alternative Health Belief Systems

Faculty: Dr. Andrea Kitta (Department of English)
Course Information: HNRS 2011.004, Humanities Credit, WI, CRN: 33104, -or- HNRS 2013.002, Social Science Credit, WI, CRN: 32994
Schedule: 4:00pm-7:00pm Mondays 

Seminar Description: While most social science disciplines consider alternative health systems to be either historical or marginal, statistical studies that a substantial proportion of the North American population shares in alternative health belief system traditions. If this is the case, alternative medicine remains a factor in North American health care. Students in this seminar will attempt to understand the nature of alternative health and how people perceive illness, health, and wellness through class discussion and (voluntary) exposure to alternative health practices. By the end of the course, students will have been challenged to define their own health beliefs while firmly understanding those of others. Important Note: This class will offer Humanities or Social Sciences credit and count towards satisfying the Writing Intensive requirement, under one professor.   

Use and Abuse of the Bible: What the Bible Says (and Doesn’t Say) about Current Cultural Issues

Faculty: Dr. Lee Johnson (Departments of Philosophy, Religious Studies)
Course Information: HNRS 2011.001, CRN: 32848, FC:HU, WI
Schedule: 11:00am-12:15pm Tuesdays and Thursdays 

Seminar Description: The question, “what does the Bible say?” is a common starting position for socio-cultural debates in current society. This course will explores exactly what the Bible does say about several issues for which it is frequently cited in current society, such as: sex, family values, divorce, homosexuality, war, women’s rights, and the supremacy of the Christian religion. The class will begin with an overview of the origins of the Bible, the formation of the canon, and then will use the issue of women’s leadership as a test case for the dissenting viewpoints that are represented in the biblical writings. Students will come to understand the conflicting views the Bible through this course. Important Note: This class will offer Humanities credit and count towards satisfying the Writing Intensive requirement. 

Sex, Love, and War: A History of the Middle East Through Women’s Writings

Faculty: Dr. Mona Russell
Course Information: HNRS 2011.005, CRN: 33105, FC:HU, WI
Schedule: 5:00pm-8:00pm, Wednesdays 

Seminar Description: This course will allow intellectually motivated students to explore the woman’s voice in Middle Eastern literature.  Although the focus is on literature, the approach is interdisciplinary, as students will be studying the historical context of novels and the changing position of women in varying social and economic contexts and comparing change over time in different national settings and genres of literature. At times during the course, students will be exposed to guest speakers of different nationalities or specialties in line with course themes. Important Note: This class will offer Humanities credit and count towards satisfying the Writing Intensive requirement.  

Sport for Development: Community and Social Change

Faculty: Dr. Stacy Warner (Department of Kinesiology)
Course Information: HNRS 2013.003, CRN: 33054, FC:SO, WI
Schedule: 9:30am-10:45am Tuesdays and Thursdays 

Seminar Description: This course focuses on utilizing sport as a platform for achieving positive outcomes related to economic development, social inclusion, community cohesion, and healthy lifestyles, along with community and peace building. Students will explore the research related to sport for development and consider how positive community and social change can occur through sport and sport programming. This course will take students to the crossroads of research, theory, practice, and passion of sport. Important Note: This class will offer Social Sciences credit and count towards satisfying the Writing Intensive requirement.  

Methods and Madness: Creative Writing Workshop

Faculty: Dr. Liza Weiland (Department of English)
Course Information: HNRS 2012.001, CRN: 33103, FC:FA, WI
Schedule: 12:30pm-1:45pm, Tuesdays and Thursdays 

Seminar Description: This course is designed to be an engaging introduction to the broad field of creative writing with a focus on poetry and fiction. Read the poems and short stories of some of the most famous creative writers. Then, try your hand at it in a supportive, engaging atmosphere. Students enrolled in this course will have the chance to become dynamic, creative writers. Important Note: This class will offer Social Sciences credit and count towards satisfying the Writing Intensive requirement.  

Stigma, Paradoxes and the Human Condition

Faculty: Dr. Daniel Goldberg (Department of Bioethics & Interdisciplinary Studies, BSOM)
Course Information: HNRS 2011.009, CRN: 33730, FC:HU, WI
Schedule: 12:30pm-1:45pm, Mondays and Thursdays 

Seminar Description:  Pain, as Emily Dickinson once noted, has an “element of blank.” It is an immensity that can at times blot out the world. And yet pain of some form or another is as close as any other to a universal feature of the human condition. The Institute of Medicine recently estimated that 116 million American adults suffer from chronic pain. This number is likely a vast underestimate as it does not include adolescents, children, or infants, all of whom experience pain. However, one of the many paradoxes of pain is that although pain is universal, it is also quintessentially subjective: my pain is by definition different from your pain, even if the cause of the pain is identical. Moreover, some who experience pain do not seem to suffer, while others who suffer do not seem to experience pain. Finally, there is overwhelming evidence both that pain is poorly treated across the globe – including the U.S. and the global North – and that there are stark domestic and global inequalities in the prevalence and treatment of pain. This course will explore the lived experiences of pain, its many paradoxes, and the extent to which it is a key feature of the human condition. Readings and analyses will be drawn from modalities as diverse as history, religious studies, philosophy, literature, poetry, public health, medicine, and law. Important Note: This class will offer Humanities credit and count towards satisfying the Writing Intensive requirement. 

Material Culture – 3D Construction 

Faculty: Robert Ebendorf - Instructor (Department of Fine Arts)
Course Information: HNRS 2012.002, CRN: 33143, FC:FA, WI
Schedule: 2:00pm-3:15pm Tuesdays and Thursdays 

Seminar Description: During this course, students will explore and experience many materials including wood, Styrofoam, and string. Students will transform their ideas from basic drawings to 3D constructions. The course will focus on problem solving and creative thinking. Basic tools will be used. Students will incur a minimal cost for materials needed for class projects. Demonstrations and basic lectures will be used to introduce and facilitate each project and the students' creative thinking. Important Note: This class will offer Fine Arts credit and count towards satisfying the Writing Intensive requirement.  

Global Understanding in Health Sciences: Art as Social Commentary

Faculty: Drs. Annette Greer and Susan Meggs (Department of Interior Design; Bioethics and Interdisciplinary Studies)
Course Information: HNRS 2011.008, Humanities, WI, CRN: 33145. -OR- HNRS 2012.003, Fine Arts, WI, CRN: 33149
Schedule: 9:30am-10:45am Tuesday and Thursday 

Seminar Description: This course will offer interdisciplinary scholarly and experiential opportunities for the development of various media forms and community service in Pitt County. This seminar focuses on exploration of global healthcare issues through the lens of art with the assistance of experts in global cultures. Students prepare their capacity for empathy and attune their observational skills through the integrative learning about art and health sciences. Further, this course allows cultural understanding of the meaning of health and response to illness on a global basis. Important Note: This class will offer Humanities or Fine Arts credit and satisfy the Writing Intensive requirement. Instructors are team-teaching the course, so both sections above are the same course.  

Digital Humanities and Buddhist Holy Land

Faculty: Dr. Derek Maher (Department of Religious Studies)
Course Information: HNRS 2011.010, CRN: 35434, FC:HU, WI
Schedule: 2:00pm-4:50pm Mondays 

Seminar Description: Taught as a flipped class during the spring semester, this course will instruct students in the same content as longstanding Buddhism course (RELI 2692). In addition, students will also learn the methodologies of the Digital Humanities and other disciplines relevant for a research project in which the students will be involved during a summer study abroad program. The research project during the summer will involve the assessment and documentation of sites that are sacred to Buddhists in India and Nepal. Important Note: This class will offer Humanities credit satisfy the Writing Intensive requirement.

Fall 2015 Honors Seminars

Voyages in the Arts, Literature and History of the Sea 

Faculty: Dr. Tim Runyan (Honors College)

Material Culture-3D Construction 

Faculty: Mr. Bob Ebendorf (School of Art and Design)

Problem Solving in Jewelry Making

Faculty: Mr. Bob Ebendorf (School of Art and Design)

Ocean Exploration: Shipwrecks, Conservation, and Technology  

Faculty: Dr. Tim Runyan (Honors College)


Spring 2015 Honors Seminars

Ethics, Global Health and the Fundamental Causes of Disease

Faculty: Dr. Daniel Goldberg (Department of Bioethics and Interdisciplinary Studies)

Genes, Germs, and Nuclear War 

Faculty: Dr. Jessica Bardill (Department of English)

The Arts, Literature and History of the Sea 

Faculty: Dr. Tim Runyan (Honors College)

Cultural Landscapes of Eastern North Carolina in Photography and Writing 

Faculty: Dr. Daniel Kariko (School of Art and Design) and Dr. Charles Twardy (School of Communication)

Culture, Health and Healing 

Faculty: Dr. Blakely Brooks (Department of Anthropology)

Poor Health: The Psychology of Poverty and Health 

Faculty: Dr. Susan McCammon and Dr. Sam Sears (Department of Psychology)

Ocean Exploration: Shipwrecks, Conservation, and Technology 

Faculty: Dr. Tim Runyan (Honors College)

Six Debates Shaping the States: Criminal Justice Issues in the Modern World 

Faculty: Dr. Megan Magers and Dr. Patrick Cundiff (Department of Criminal Justice)

Psychology of Talent Development 

Faculty: Dr. Lori Flint (Department of Special Education, Foundations and Research)

Along the AT:  Experiences and Reflections on the Appalachian Trail 

Faculty: Dr. Traci Birch (Department of Geography) and Dr. Mary Beth Corbin (Office of Student Transition)

Coastal Water Resources: Exploring Sustainable Solutions for the 21st Century 

Faculty: Dr. Mike O'Driscoll (Department of Geological Sciences)

Marketing Small Businesses: As Seen on TV 

Faculty: Dr. Christy Ashley (Department of Marketing and Supply Chain Management) 


Spring 2014 Honors Seminars

An Assault on Humanity: The Holocaust

Faculty: Dr. Michael Bassman (Honors College)

Behavioral Addictions

Faculty: Dr. Mary Crozier (Department of Addictions and Rehabilitation Counseling)

Extreme Physics

Faculty: Dr. John Kenney (Department of Physics)

Global Heavy Metal Music

Faculty: Dr. Dan Guberman (School of Music)

Global Understanding in Health Sciences: Art as Social Commentary

Faculty: Dr. Annette Greer (Department of Bioethics and Interdisciplinary Studies) and Susan Martin Meggs, MFA (Department of Interior Design)

Honors Creative Writing Workshop: Poetry and Fiction

Faculty: Dr. Liza Wieland (Department of English)

How Do We Know Where We Are?  Exploring Geospatial History and Technology

Faculty: Dr. Viva Reynolds and Dr. Karen Mulcahy (Department of Geography)

In Search of Sacred Space: Liminal Places in the Past and Present

Faculty: Dr. Jessica Christie and Dr. Punham Madhok (School of Art and Design)

Ocean Exploration: Shipwrecks, Conservation, and Technology

Faculty: Dr. Tim Runyan (Honors College)

Polyhedra and Tessellations: Visions of Symmetry in Mathematics, Natural Sciences, Art and Design

Faculty: Dr. Sviatoslav Archava (Department of Mathematics)

The Psychology of Human-Dog Interactions

Faculty: Dr. Lisa Maag (Department of Psychology)

Root that Mountain Down: Appalachian Culture and Rural Imaginings in America

Faculty: Dr. Marc Faris (School of Music) and Leanne Smith, MFA (Department of English)

Science and Society in the Age of Genomics

Faculty: Dr. John Stiller and Dr. Jean-Luc Scemama (Department of Biology)

Social Entrepreneurship, Engagement, and Community Building

Faculty: Dr. Sharon Paynter (Department of Political Science)


Spring 2013 Honors Seminars

The Assault on Humanity: The Holocaust

Faculty:  Dr. Michael Bassman (Honors College)

Crime Scene Analysis 

Faculty:  Dr. Anthony Kennedy  (Department of Chemistry) & Dr. Dennis Honeycutt (Department of Criminal Justice)

Cuba:  So Near Yet So Foreign 

Faculty:  Dr. Luci Fernandes (Department of Anthropology)

Israel & the Arabs:  Co-existence & Conflict  

Faculty:  Dr. Mona Russell (Department of History)

Leadership Across the Professions: Foundations in Philosophy, Literature, and Law 

Faculty:  Dr. James LeRoy Smith, (Department of Philosophy) &  Dr. Gregory L. Hassler (Department of Bioethics & Interdisciplinary Studies)  

Life in Space: From Inquiry to Exploration and Back Again 

Faculty:  Dr. John Rummel (Institute for Coastal Science and Policy) & Dr. Matt Schrenk (Department of Biology)

Living Green: The World between Technology and Humanity 

Faculty:  Dr. Mike Behm (Technology Systems), Dr. Robert Chin (Technology Systems), Dr. Eric Connell (Department of Construction Management)

Ocean Exploration: Shipwrecks, Conservation, and Technology 

Faculty:  Dr. Tim Runyan (Honors College)

Pain, Its Paradoxes, and the Human Condition 

Faculty:  Dr. Daniel S. Goldberg, J.D (Department of Bioethics & Interdisciplinary Studies;  Brody School of Medicine)

Puppet Shows that Make a Difference! 

Faculty:  Dr. Deborah Thomson (School of Communication)

What’s on the Table? The Science and Culture of Plants as Food 

Faculty:  Dr. Claudia Jolls (Department of Biology) & Dr. Elizabeth Wall-Bassett (Department of Nutrition)

“Who or What is Controlling You?  A History and Science of Self-determination” 

Faculty:  Dr. Laura Edwards (Department of Psychology) 

Wilderness Writing

Faculty:  Dr. Ashley Egan (Department of Biology) & Ms. Stephanie West-Puckett (Department of English) 


Spring 2012 Honors Seminars

The Assault on Humanity: The Holocaust

Faculty:  Dr. Michael Bassman (Honors College)

Around the World in 15 Weeks: An Investigation of Cultural Similarities through Global Conversations with College Students in Africa, Asia, and Latin America

Faculty:  Dr. Heidi Luchsinger (Department of Anthropology)

Building an Innovation Economy Through Creative Problem Solving, Design and Entrepreneurship

Faculty: Mr. Wayne Godwin (School of Art and Design), Ms. Marti Van Scott (Office of Technology Transfer), and Ms. Marty Hackney (Entrepreneurial Initiative)

Ethics, Global Health, & the Fundamental Causes of Disease

Faculty:  Dr. Daniel Goldberg (Department of Bioethics & Interdisciplinary Studies)

Fantastic Archeology: Distinguishing Myth from Reality

Faculty:  Dr. Charles Ewen (Department of Anthropology)

Leadership in the Professions: Foundations of Philosophy and Law

Faculty:  Dr. James Leroy Smith (Department of Philosophy) and Dr. Gregory Hassler (Department of Bioethics & Interdisciplinary Studies)

Living Green: The World between Technology and Humanity

Faculty: Dr. Michael Behm, Dr. Robert Chin (Department of Technology Systems), and Dr. Eric Connell (Department of Construction Management)

Middle Eastern Women's Voices in Love, War, Fact, & Fiction

Faculty:  Dr. Mona Russell (Department of History) and Dr. Rick Taylor (Department of English)

The Nobel Prize: A History of Genius, Controversy, and Prestige

Faculty:  Dr. Michael Bassman (Distinguished Honors Professor, The Honors College)

Pilgrimage in Various Cultural and Temporal Settings

Faculty:  Dr. Jelena Bogdanović and Dr. Jessica Christie (Department of Art History)

Science and Society in the Age of Genomics

Faculty: Dr. Jean-Luc Scemama and Dr. John Stiller (Department of Biology)

Think Chronically: From McDonalds to Dialysis- Exploring Solutions to Eastern North Carolina's Healthcare Challenges

Faculty: Dr. Paul Bolin and Dr. Cynthia Christiano (Department of Internal Medicine, Division of Nephrology and Hypertension)

Under the Microscope of Art: Creative Problem-Solving in the Health Sciences

Faculty:  Ms. Susan Meggs (Department of Interior Design & Merchandising) and Dr. Annette Greer (Department of Bioethics & Interdisciplinary Studies)

Wilderness Writing

Faculty: Dr. Ashley Egan (Department of Biology) and Dr. Stephanie West-Puckett (Department of English)

facebook pinterest
instagram youtube
twitter flickr
linked email