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Welcome to ECCSFN!
Mission

  • Advance the understanding of the nervous system by bringing together scientists of diverse backgrounds, by facilitating the integration of research directed at all levels of biological organization, and by encouraging translational research and the application of new scientific knowledge to improve treatments and cures.
  • Provide professional development activities and educational resources for neuroscientists at all stages of their careers, including undergraduates, graduates, and post doctoral fellows, and increase participation of scientists from a diversity of cultural and ethnic backgrounds.
  • Inform legislators and other policy makers about new scientific knowledge and recent developments in neuroscience research and their implications for public policy, societal benefit, and continued scientific progress.
  • Provide a forum for the exchange of ideas and information between Eastern Carolina-area neuroscientists.
  • Offer educational resources and opportunities for teachers, students and the general public.

Membership in the Eastern Carolina Chapter is open to:

  • Any person holding advanced degree(s) residing in the State of North Carolina that conducts basic research, performs clinical work, performs medical work in neuroscience or its related fields (Regular Membership).
  • Any student enrolled in programs at degree-granting institutions of higher education within North Carolina (Student Membership).
  • Any person interested in the neurosciences but not eligible for regular or student membership as defined in the bylaws of ECCSFN (Affiliate Membership).

ECCSFN also assists its members and invited speakers by applying for: 

  • Travel grants for graduate students and postdoctoral fellows to attend the Society for Neuroscience meeting or other scientific meetings/events. 
  • Travel awards for invited speakers. 
  • SFN Chapter Grants that support and encourage chapter activities. 
  • Foundation and local grants that support chapter activities and host leading neuroscientists.

Brain Injury News -- ScienceDaily

  • Our brain omits grammatical elements when it has limited resources
    A study of the use of pronouns by French speakers with agrammatic aphasia shows that grammatical pronouns are significantly more impaired in speech than lexical ones. The findings support a new theory of grammar which suggests that grammatical elements contain secondary information that speakers with limited cognitive resources can omit from their speech and still make sense.
  • Better mini brains could help scientists identify treatments for Zika-related brain damage
    Researchers have developed an improved technique for creating simplified human brain tissue from stem cells. Because these so-called 'mini brain organoids' mimic human brains in how they grow and develop, they're vital to studying complex neurological diseases.