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The College of Health and Human Performance
Department of Recreation and Leisure Studies


Wounded Warriors


 
 
 
 
ECU Warrior Training Program
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 


ECU Warrior Training Program

In February 2008 East Carolina University and the United States Marine Corps began the Training for Optimal Performance program at ECU's Psychophysiology Lab and Biofeedback Clinic. Biofeedback training allows wounded soldiers to recognize and control the symptoms of Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) and Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI), the signature wounds of the Iraq War. For a more in depth explanation of the program please view the following article, Training for Optimal Performance Biofeedback Program. Additionally, East Carolina University regularly features professors, who help inspire and encourage students. One feature included the Wounded Warriors program and the video can be viewed here or read the article here.

Follow the link if you are interested in making a contribution to the Wounded Warrior Fund. When selecting a Fund make sure to select The College of Health and Human Performance. Next, under the column, Other Fund, specify Wounded Warriors. All contributions are greatly appreciated.

More information about the ECU Warrior Training Program previous and future events.

Post–Traumatic Stress Disorder

According to the RAND Corporation, approximately 300,000 U.S. troops are suffering from major depression or post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) as a result of serving in the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan. Additionally, only one-half of these veterans will seek mental health services for their disorder. Currently there are few effective methods to treat PTSD and none to prevent this devastating and debilitating disorder that causes emotional trauma to the Marine/Soldier and their families.

PTSD Links

National Center for PTSD
Department of Veteran Affairs
Disabled American Veterans
The American Legion
Veterans of Foreign Wars
The Military Order of the Purple Heart
Paralyzed Veterans of America
George Carlton PTSD video