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Eastern Carolina Chapter of the Society for Neuroscience


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For correspondence, please contact the Council Secretary:

Sonja Bareiss, Ph.D., PT
College of Allied Health Sciences
Health Sciences Building, 2505G
Greenville, NC 27858

Phone: 252.744.6243
Email: bareisss@ecu.edu



Mission

  1. Advance the understanding of the brain and the nervous system by bringing together scientists of diverse backgrounds, by facilitating the integration of research directed at all levels of biological organization, and by encouraging translational research and the application of new scientific knowledge to develop improved disease treatments and cures.

  2. Provide professional development activities, information, and educational resources for neuroscientists at all stages of their careers, including undergraduates, graduates, and post doctoral fellows, and increase participation of scientists from a diversity of cultural and ethnic backgrounds.

  3. Promote public information and general education about the nature of scientific discovery and the results and implications of the latest neuroscience research. Support active and continuing discussions on ethical issues relating to the conduct and outcomes of neuroscience research.

  4. Inform legislators and other policy makers about new scientific knowledge and recent developments in neuroscience research and their implications for public policy, societal benefit, and continued scientific progress.

  5. In addition, the purpose of the Eastern Carolina Chapter is 1) to provide a forum for the exchange of ideas and information and ideas between East Carolina-area neuroscientists; and 2) through community outreach, to offer educational resources and opportunities for teachers, students and the public in general.
Membership in the Eastern Carolina Chapter shall be open to:
  1. Any person holding advanced degree(s) residing in the State of North Carolina that conducts basic research or  performs clinical and/or medical work in neuroscience or its related fields (Regular Membership).
  2. Any student enrolled in programs at degree-granting institutions of higher education within North Carolina (Student Membership).
  3. Any person interested in the neurosciences but not available for regular or student membership (Affiliate) as defined in the bylaws of SFN.

For more information and application, please click here.

The Neuroscience chapter also assists its members and invited speakers by applying for and obtaining:
  1. Travel grants for graduate students and postdoctoral fellows to attend the Society for Neuroscience meeting.
  2. The Grass Traveling Scientist Award, which enables local chapters to host leading neuroscientists at their institutions.
  3. SFN Chapter Grants (from $500 to $2000) that support and encourage chapter activities.
  4. Foundation grants that support chapter activities and host leading neuroscientists.
 

Neuroscience News -- ScienceDaily

  • Avoiding neurodegeneration: Nerve cells borrow a trick from their synapses to dispose of garbage
    Genetic defects affecting tiny channels in human nerve cells lead to several neurological diseases that result from aberrant nerve transmission, such as episodic ataxia, absence epilepsy, and migraines. These disorders have also been associated with neurodegeneration, but it has been less clear why this should be.
  • Crossing fingers can reduce feelings of pain
    How you feel pain is affected by where sources of pain are in relation to each other, and so crossing your fingers can change what you feel on a single finger, finds new research. "Many people suffer from chronic pain, and the level of pain experienced can be higher than would be expected from actual tissue damage. Our research is basic laboratory science, but it raises the interesting possibility that pain levels could be manipulated by applying additional stimuli, and by moving one part of the body relative to others," the senior author explained.
  • Medulloblastoma: Promising drug target identified
    A protein has been found that is critical to both the normal development of the brain and, in many cases, the development of medulloblastoma, a fast-growing brain tumor that usually strikes children under 10. When the researchers cut the level of the protein Eya1 in half in mice prone to develop medulloblastoma, the animals' risk of dying from the disease dropped dramatically.