ECU Logo
 
Eastern Carolina Chapter of the Society for Neuroscience


ECCSFN_Banner1


 
 
 
 
ECCSFN Faculty Research Interests
 
 
Events/Seminars
 
 
 
 
Awards
 
 
 
Website Contact

For correspondence, please contact the Council Secretary:

Sonja Bareiss, Ph.D., PT
College of Allied Health Sciences
Health Sciences Building, 2505G
Greenville, NC 27858

Phone: 252.744.6243
Email: bareisss@ecu.edu



Mission

  1. Advance the understanding of the brain and the nervous system by bringing together scientists of diverse backgrounds, by facilitating the integration of research directed at all levels of biological organization, and by encouraging translational research and the application of new scientific knowledge to develop improved disease treatments and cures.

  2. Provide professional development activities, information, and educational resources for neuroscientists at all stages of their careers, including undergraduates, graduates, and post doctoral fellows, and increase participation of scientists from a diversity of cultural and ethnic backgrounds.

  3. Promote public information and general education about the nature of scientific discovery and the results and implications of the latest neuroscience research. Support active and continuing discussions on ethical issues relating to the conduct and outcomes of neuroscience research.

  4. Inform legislators and other policy makers about new scientific knowledge and recent developments in neuroscience research and their implications for public policy, societal benefit, and continued scientific progress.

  5. In addition, the purpose of the Eastern Carolina Chapter is 1) to provide a forum for the exchange of ideas and information and ideas between East Carolina-area neuroscientists; and 2) through community outreach, to offer educational resources and opportunities for teachers, students and the public in general.
Membership in the Eastern Carolina Chapter shall be open to:
  1. Any person holding advanced degree(s) residing in the State of North Carolina that conducts basic research or  performs clinical and/or medical work in neuroscience or its related fields (Regular Membership).
  2. Any student enrolled in programs at degree-granting institutions of higher education within North Carolina (Student Membership).
  3. Any person interested in the neurosciences but not available for regular or student membership (Affiliate) as defined in the bylaws of SFN.

For more information and application, please click here.

The Neuroscience chapter also assists its members and invited speakers by applying for and obtaining:
  1. Travel grants for graduate students and postdoctoral fellows to attend the Society for Neuroscience meeting.
  2. The Grass Traveling Scientist Award, which enables local chapters to host leading neuroscientists at their institutions.
  3. SFN Chapter Grants (from $500 to $2000) that support and encourage chapter activities.
  4. Foundation grants that support chapter activities and host leading neuroscientists.
 

Neuroscience News -- ScienceDaily

  • Special fats proven essential for brain growth
    Certain special fats found in blood are essential for human brain growth and function, new research suggests. New published studies show that mutations in the protein Mfsd2a causes impaired brain development in humans. Mfsd2a is the transporter in the brain for a special type of fat called lysophosphatidylcholines (LPCs) -- composed of essential fatty acids like omega-3.
  • Can you see what I hear? Blind human echolocators use visual areas of the brain
    Certain blind individuals have the ability to use echoes from tongue or finger clicks to recognize objects in the distance, and use echolocation as a replacement for vision. Research shows echolocation in blind individuals is a full form of sensory substitution, and that blind echolocation experts recruit regions of the brain normally associated with visual perception when making echo-based assessments of objects.
  • Earthquakes prove to be an unexpected help in interpreting brain activity of very premature babies
    Researchers have created a "brainstorm barometer" that allows computers to calculate the brain functions of very premature babies during their first hours of life. The new research method is based on the hypothesis that the brainstorms generated by the billions of neurons inside a baby's head are governed by the same rules as other massive natural phenomena, such as earthquakes, forest fires or snow avalanches.